Jun 22, 2024  
The University of North Carolina at Pembroke 2019-2020 Catalog 
    
The University of North Carolina at Pembroke 2019-2020 Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Information Technology Management

  
  • ITM 3200. E-Commerce (3 credits)


    This course is designed to help business students increase their knowledge in E-Commerce so that they may better understand how organizations can successfully operate their businesses online. Specific topics to be addressed include business models, technical infrastructure, software procurement strategies, customer interaction, and the implementation of customer-centric systems. PREREQ: A “C” or better in ITM 3010 .

  
  • ITM 3500. Database Management Systems (3 credits)


    In this course, students will investigate application development in a business database environment with an emphasis on designing, modifying, and querying databases. In this course students will develop an understanding of database technology, database design, database selection and acquisition. Decision-making using databases will be covered. Overviews of emerging trends in data management will be covered. PREREQ: A “C” or better in ITM 3010  or ACC 4130 .

  
  • ITM 3700. Enterprise Business Systems (3 credits)


    Enterprise Business Systems provide information management and analysis to organizations. This course provides the student with an overview of Enterprise Business Systems. Topics covered will include functional systems, cross-functional systems, CRM, MRPII/ERP, SCM. PREREQ: A “C” or better in ACC 2280 , ITM 3010 , and MKT 3120 .

  
  • ITM 4100. System Analysis and Design (3 credits)


    An introduction to systems thinking and the systems analysis process. The emphasis will be on traditional analysis, design, and implementation through the data flow analysis and systems development life-cycle approaches. Student teams will perform system studies of real-world problems and develop potential solutions. PREREQ: A “C” or better in ITM 3500 ; ITM 3100  is recommended.

  
  • ITM 4400. Project Management (3 credits)


    This course is designed to provide knowledge of business project management in general and information technology project management in specific. It explores the dimensions and elements of project management; concepts, methodologies, strategies, and structures. Attention will also be given to cost controls, teamwork, and quality management. PREREQ: A “C” or better in ITM 3010  or ACC 4130 .

  
  • ITM 4600. Systems Security, Reliability, and Privacy (3 credits)


    This course develops the student’s ability to comprehend, communicate, and apply current electronic commerce developments as a professional involved in designing, building, or managing information and accounting systems. Topics include the number-one topic of concern for businesses using E-business applications: transaction security and privacy. In addition, reliability of information systems as well as business decisions required to implement, plan, and support an electronic commerce endeavor are presented. PREREQ: A “C” or better in ITM 3500 .

  
  • ITM 4800. Information Technology Management Internship (1-3 credits)


    A work experience in an operating business where the student, under academic and employer supervision, participates in actual information technology managerial functions (40 work hours per semester credit hour required). Student must keep an extensive diary of work experiences and submit frequent reports to academic supervisor. PREREQ: A “B” or better in ITM 4100  and ITM 4400 .

  
  • ITM 4950. Advanced Information Technology Management (3 credits)


    This course emphasizes the management of information technology and related resources from a broad strategic perspective. Topics covered include assessment of information technologies and their fit to organizational structure, tracking emerging technologies and trends, managing portfolio resources and matching them to business needs, technology transfer, end-user computing, outsourcing, theoretical models, strategic applications, and strategic IT planning. PREREQ: A “C” or better in FIN 3100 , ITM 3010  and ITM 4400 .

  
  • ITM 4990. Directed Studies in Information Technology Management (1-3 credits)


    Independent study in an area of ITM of particular interest to a student under the direction of one or more faculty members. Students must submit detailed proposals for a directed study, detailing the proposed plan of study, research involved, dates for deliverables, final product to be produced, and faculty who will be supervising. Proposals will be reviewed by a faculty committee to determine acceptance of the proposal. PREREQ: A “C” or better in ITM 4100  and ITM 4400 .

  
  • ITM 5370. Management Information Systems (3 credits)


    Conceptual and practical foundations of information processing systems support for management and decision-making functions, computer system project management, economic and legal considerations of management information systems, system implementation and evaluation.


Special Topics in Information Technology Management

  
  • ITMS 4xxx. Special Topics in Information Technology Management (3 credits)


    The study of a particular topic of special importance, relevance, and currency in the field of Information Technology Management. The content of the special topics course varies with each offering. PREREQ: A “C” or better in ITM 3010 .

  
  • ITMS 5xxx. Special Topics (3 credits)


    The study of a particular topic of special importance, relevance, and currency to students in the Master of Business Administration program. The content of the special topics course varies with each offering and may be taken twice.


Journalism

  
  • JRN 1610. Student Newspaper Production (1 credit)


    Experience in producing a student newspaper, The Pine Needle. Reporting, writing and editing news stories, news judgment, page design, photography, advertising, circulation, and Web-based newspaper production activities are covered. Pass/Fail grading.

  
  • JRN 1620. Student Newspaper Production (1 credit)


    Experience in producing a student newspaper, The Pine Needle. Reporting, writing and editing news stories, news judgment, page design, photography, advertising, circulation, and Web-based newspaper production activities are covered. Pass/Fail grading.

  
  • JRN 1820. Yearbook Production (1 credit)


    Experience in the details of producing an extended feature publication through work on the UNC Pembroke yearbook, the Indianhead. Activities will include theme development, layout design, feature writing, photography selection/cropping, entering/editing copy at the computer, art work, and general production work. Pass/Fail grading.

  
  • JRN 1830. Yearbook Production (1 credit)


    Experience in the details of producing an extended feature publication through work on the UNC Pembroke yearbook, the Indianhead. Activities will include theme development, layout design, feature writing, photography selection/cropping, entering/editing copy at the computer, art work, and general production work. Pass/Fail grading.

  
  • JRN 1840. Yearbook Production (1 credit)


    Experience in the details of producing an extended feature publication through work on the UNC Pembroke yearbook, the Indianhead. Activities will include theme development, layout design, feature writing, photography selection/cropping, entering/editing copy at the computer, art work, and general production work. Pass/Fail grading.

  
  • JRN 2610. Student Newspaper Production (1 credit)


    Experience in producing a student newspaper, The Pine Needle. Reporting, writing and editing news stories, news judgment, page design, photography, advertising, circulation, and Web-based newspaper production activities are covered. Pass/Fail grading.

  
  • JRN 2620. Student Newspaper Production (1 credit)


    Experience in producing a student newspaper, The Pine Needle. Reporting, writing and editing news stories, news judgment, page design, photography, advertising, circulation, and Web-based newspaper production activities are covered. Pass/Fail grading.

  
  • JRN 2820. Yearbook Production (1 credit)


    Experience in the details of producing an extended feature publication through work on the UNC Pembroke yearbook, the Indianhead. Activities will include theme development, layout design, feature writing, photography selection/cropping, entering/editing copy at the computer, art work, and general production work. Pass/Fail grading.

  
  • JRN 2830. Yearbook Production (1 credit)


    Experience in the details of producing an extended feature publication through work on the UNC Pembroke yearbook, the Indianhead. Activities will include theme development, layout design, feature writing, photography selection/cropping, entering/editing copy at the computer, art work, and general production work. Pass/Fail grading.

  
  • JRN 2840. Yearbook Production (1 credit)


    Experience in the details of producing an extended feature publication through work on the UNC Pembroke yearbook, the Indianhead. Activities will include theme development, layout design, feature writing, photography selection/cropping, entering/editing copy at the computer, art work, and general production work. Pass/Fail grading.

  
  • JRN 3010. News Writing and Reporting (3 credits)


    Study of news story elements, writing of leads, organization and writing of various types of news stories. Experience in news gathering, interviewing and writing news for print media PREREQ: MCM 2400.

  
  • JRN 3050. Feature Writing (3 credits)


    Practical experience in writing in‑depth articles for newspapers and magazines. PREREQ: MCM 2400.

  
  • JRN 3060. News Editing (3 credits)


    Duties and practices of the newspaper copy editor, editing techniques, headline and caption writing, cropping of photography, use of AP style, trends in newspaper page design, and ethical responsibilities of news editors. PREREQ: MCM 2400.

  
  • JRN 3090. Editorial Writing (3 credits)


    Study and analysis of editorial writing in newspapers with emphasis on principles and practices. Practical experience in writing editorials for newspapers. PREREQ: MCM 2400.

  
  • JRN 3170. History of American Journalism (3 credits)


    The inventions, events, and people shaping and influencing journalism in the United States. The history and development of American journalism and mass media from Colonial times to the present. PREREQ: MCM 2100  or consent of instructor.

  
  • JRN 3200. Photojournalism (3 credits)


    Basic visual and technical aspects of photojournalism. Photographic coverage of news, sports, features, events, and other newspaper, magazine, and public relations subjects. The picture story, picture editing, the social documentary tradition in journalism.

  
  • JRN 3250. Sports Journalism (3 credits)


    A consideration of contemporary sports reporting, including trends and philosophies of sports reporting; writing for major and minor sports; interviewing; features; columns; and legal aspects of sports reporting. PREREQ: MCM 2400.

  
  • JRN 3400. Advanced News Writing and Reporting (3 credits)


    In-depth exploration of news media functions and how journalists gather and report news. Practical experience in identifying news, organizing and writing stories in proper formats for a wide range of reporting possibilities. PREREQ: JRN 3010 .

  
  • JRN 3610. Student Newspaper Production (1 credit)


    Experience in producing a student newspaper, The Pine Needle. Reporting, writing and editing news stories, news judgment, page design, photography, advertising, circulation, and Web-based newspaper production activities are covered. Pass/Fail grading.

  
  • JRN 3620. Student Newspaper Production (1 credit)


    Experience in producing a student newspaper, The Pine Needle. Reporting, writing and editing news stories, news judgment, page design, photography, advertising, circulation, and Web-based newspaper production activities are covered. Pass/Fail grading.

  
  • JRN 4050. Magazine Writing and Editing (3 credits)


    Instruction and practice in planning, writing, and editing copy for magazines. PREREQ: JRN 3010  and JRN 3050 .

  
  • JRN 4100. Web Journalism (3 credits)


    Practice reporting, writing, and producing stories for converged mass media online. Hard news, features, photography, videos on websites, blogs, wikis, virtual worlds, social media. Internet linking strategies, use of reliable online resources for journalistic research, convergence. PREREQ: MCM 2400.

  
  • JRN 4200. Science Journalism (3 credits)


    Reporting and writing about science for newspapers and magazines; interviewing, features, series, columns. PREREQ: JRN 3050  or JRN 3010 .

  
  • JRN 4600. Investigative Journalism (3 credits)


    Practical experience in researching and writing nonfiction articles suitable for publication, using forms, styles, and subject matter appropriate for the tradition known as investigative journalism. PREREQ: JRN 3010 , JRN 3060  and MCM 4360.

  
  • JRN 4610. Student Newspaper Production (1 credit)


    Experience in producing a student newspaper, The Pine Needle. Reporting, writing and editing news stories, news judgment, page design, photography, advertising, circulation, and Web-based newspaper production activities are covered. Pass/Fail grading.

  
  • JRN 4620. Student Newspaper Production (1 credit)


    Experience in producing a student newspaper, The Pine Needle. Reporting, writing and editing news stories, news judgment, page design, photography, advertising, circulation, and Web-based newspaper production activities are covered. Pass/Fail grading.


Library

  
  • LIB 1000. Introduction to Academic Research (3 credits)


    This three-credit General Education elective course will introduce students to the basic information literacy skills necessary to locate, critically evaluate, and ethically use information for academic research assignments. This course is ideal for new students, but can be valuable for students at any level, including seniors working on capstone projects.

  
  • LIB 5000. Introduction to Graduate Academic Research (3 credits)


    This three-credit course will provide students with an in-depth examination of academic research sources and methods specific to their individual academic disciplines. This course is ideal for students just starting graduate studies. Topics include discipline-specific electronic resources, core information sources used both academically and professionally within the discipline, authority within the disciplinary context, publishing conventions and timelines, as well as information retrieval, organization, and ethical use.


Mathematics

  
  • MAT 0104. Fundamentals of Mathematics (3 credits)


    A study of topics in algebra that are essential for success in college algebra (MAT 107). Content includes solving of linear equations and inequalities as well as systems of linear equations and inequalities. Topics from geometry, polynomials, factoring, rational expressions, and radicals are also studied. (This course does not count toward earned hours or graduation requirements. Most students will be placed in this course by scores on the Mathematics Placement Test.)

  
  • MAT 1050. Introduction to College Mathematics (3 credits)


    Topics from mathematics which may include sets, logic, algebra, graphs, functions, systems of linear equations and inequalities, geometry, probability, and statistics. Problem solving is emphasized. This course is intended to be a general education course and NOT a preparation for college algebra. Some sections of the course will develop a theme for the applications of mathematical concepts. (Credit for MAT 1050 will not be allowed if the student has previously received a grade of C or better in a math course with a higher catalog number, unless the course is being taken to replace a grade or to fulfill a requirement.)

  
  • MAT 1070. College Algebra (3 credits)


    A study of the real and complex number systems, algebraic expressions and equations, polynomial and rational functions and their graphs, inequalities and their graphs, exponential and logarithmic functions and their graphs, systems of equations, and conic sections. This course is intended to be a preparation for calculus (MAT 2150  and MAT 2210 ). A very good understanding of high school algebra is required.

  
  • MAT 1080. Plane Trigonometry (3 credits)


    A study of angle measures, trigonometric functions and their values, inverse trigonometric functions and their values, graphs of trigonometric and inverse trigonometric functions, solutions of right and oblique triangles, trigonometric identities and equations, polar coordinates, vectors, and rotation of axes. This course is intended to be a preparation for calculus (MAT 2210 ). PREREQ: MAT 1070 .

  
  • MAT 1090. Precalculus (4 credits)


    This course is an accelerated version of MAT 1070  and MAT 1080  combined. See both course descriptions for a list of topics covered. This course is intended as a rapid review of the topics in preparation for calculus.

  
  • MAT 1180. Finite Mathematics (3 credits)


    Set theory, symbolic logic, permutations and combinations, probability, conditional probability, matrices and systems of equations. Some applications to stochastic processes, Markov chains, linear programming, statistics. PREREQ: MAT 1070  or equivalent.

  
  • MAT 2100. Introduction to Statistics (3 credits)


    Elementary statistics, descriptive and inferential. Graphing data sets, finding measures of center, position, and dispersion. Probability, linear regression and correlation. Central Limit Theorem, sampling and hypothesis testing, including z-tests, student’s tests, F-test, Chi-Square, and ANOVA. The use of calculators and computers is an integral part of the course. MAT 1070  or equivalent.

  
  • MAT 2110. Survey of Geometry (3 credits)


    Topics covered involve: Plane and Solid Geometry, Coordinate Geometry, Transformational Geometry, Trigonometry, Logic, and Measurement Systems. These topics will emphasize fundamental concepts: points, lines, planes, angles, polygons, circle, perimeter, area, surface area, volume, and construction of figures. Various types of technology will be incorporated throughout the course. PREREQ: MAT 1070  and MAT 1080  or equivalent.

  
  • MAT 2150. Calculus with Applications (4 credits)


    Required for Biology majors. Not open to Mathematics majors. A study of functions of one variable; derivatives, integrals and their applications to Biological Sciences and Business. Special attention will be given to exponential functions with respect to growth and decay applications. Topics of multivariable calculus will also be included. PREREQ: MAT 1070  or MAT 1090  or equivalent.

  
  • MAT 2210. Calculus I (4 credits)


    Study of functions of one variable, topics from analytic geometry, limits and continuity; differentiation of algebraic functions; curve sketching; various applications chosen from physics, economics, and optimization. PREREQ: MAT 1070  and MAT 1080 , or MAT 1090 , or equivalent.

  
  • MAT 2220. Calculus II (4 credits)


    A study of integrals, the definite integral, the fundamental theorem of the calculus, applications of the definite integral. The derivative and integral of exponential, logarithmic, trigonometric and inverse trigonometric functions; and techniques of integration. PREREQ: C or better in MAT 2210 .

  
  • MAT 2300. Introduction to Advanced Mathematics (3 credits)


    Introduction to set theory, elementary concepts of the topology of the real line and the plane, elementary logic, and techniques of proof. PREREQ: MAT 2210  or MAT 2150 .

  
  • MAT 2500. Introduction to Teaching Mathematics in Middle Grades and Secondary Schools (2 credits)


    Designed to provide an overview of mathematics in the secondary school and early experiences for prospective mathematics teachers. These experiences include a planned program of observational and participatory experience in the mathematics classroom. PREREQ: EDN 3020 , MAT 2210  or MAT 2150 .

  
  • MAT 2600. Connections in Mathematics I (1 credit)


    This seminar course is designed to help mathematics and mathematics education majors connect and deepen their mathematical understandings of calculus-related topics. Emphasis will be placed on research and communication of mathematical ideas. Major course work will include production of portfolio artifacts that represent the major’s development of understanding in the mathematics curriculum. PREREQ/COREQ: MAT 2220 .

  
  • MAT 3110. Advanced Euclidean Geometry (3 credits)


    Topics include Plane and Solid Geometry, Coordinate Geometry, Transformational Geometry, Trigonometry, Logic, and the Systemization of Euclidean Theorems and Postulates. These topics will emphasize fundamental concepts: points, lines, planes, angles, congruence, similarity, concurrence, polygons, circle, perimeter, area, surface area, volume, and construction of figures. Various types of technology will be incorporated throughout the course. PREREQ: MAT 1070  and MAT 1080  or equivalent and MAT 2300 .

  
  • MAT 3150. Linear Algebra I (3 credits)


    An introduction to the theory of vector spaces, linear transformations, systems of linear equations, matrices, inverses, rank, determinants, inner products. Applications of matrices to problems involving systems of equations. PREREQ: MAT 2210  or MAT 2150 .

  
  • MAT 3170. Linear Algebra II (3 credits)


    Eigenvalues and eigenvectors, similarity of matrices, reduction of matrices to diagonal form. Cayley‑Hamilton theorem, minimum polynomial, Jordan canonical form. Hermitian, unitary, and normal matrices, orthonormal basis, Gram‑Schmidt process. Simplification of quadratic forms and other applications. PREREQ: MAT 3150 .

  
  • MAT 3250. Algebra I (3 credits)


    Introduction to groups, integral domains, rings and fields, with further study of subgroups, cyclic groups, groups of permutations, isomorphisms and homomorphisms of groups, direct products, and factor groups. PREREQ: MAT 2300 ; PREREQ/COREQ: MAT 3150 .

  
  • MAT 3260. Algebra II (3 credits)


    Further topics in group theory; rings, integral domains, fields, ideals, quotient rings, homomorphisms, direct sums, polynomial rings, extension fields. PREREQ: MAT 3250 .

  
  • MAT 3270. Numerical Analysis (3 credits)


    An introduction to the solution of mathematical problems by computational techniques, including both finite and iterative methods and error analysis. PREREQ: MAT 3150 , MAT 3310 , and one high-level programming language.

  
  • MAT 3280. Probability and Statistics I (3 credits)


    Probability, sample spaces, counting techniques, random variables, discrete and continuous distribution functions, characteristics functions. Binomial, Poisson, and normal distributions. Central limit theorems. PREREQ: MAT 2220 OR (MAT 2150 and MAT 2300)

  
  • MAT 3300. Probability and Statistics II (3 credits)


    Introduction to common theoretical distributions, central limit theorems, two dimensional random variables, sampling distributions, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, regression theory and applications. PREREQ: MAT 3310 , MAT 3280.

  
  • MAT 3310. Calculus III (4 credits)


    A continuation of Calculus I and II from an advanced viewpoint. L’Hospital’s rule, improper integrals, Taylor’s theorem, infinite series. Multi-variable calculus: limits, continuity, partial derivatives, extrema, iterated integrals, and applications. PREREQ: C or better in MAT 2220 .

  
  • MAT 3320. Differential Equations (3 credits)


    An introduction to ordinary differential equations including classification of solutions to differential equations, existence and uniqueness of solutions, power series methods, initial value problems, and applications. PREREQ: MAT 3310 .

  
  • MAT 3330. Discrete Mathematics (3 credits)


    Provides an introduction to discrete mathematics. Topics include graph theory, proof techniques, elementary combinatorics, discrete probability, fair outcomes, recursion, sequences, series, algorithms for computation. PREREQ: MAT 2210  or MAT 2150  and MAT 2300 .

  
  • MAT 3500. Teaching Mathematics with Technology (2 credits)


    The application of computer software and other technologies specifically used in the mathematics classroom, with their inclusion in appropriate lesson plans. Classroom management of instructional technology will be emphasized. This course is designed as a preservice course for teachers and may not be used as an advanced MAT or CSC requirement. PREREQ: Permission of instructor.

  
  • MAT 3600. Connections in Mathematics II (1 credit)


    This seminar course is designed to help mathematics and mathematics education majors connect and deepen their mathematical understandings of proof. Emphasis will be placed on research and communication of mathematical ideas. Major course work will include production of portfolio artifacts that represent the major’s development of understanding in the mathematics curriculum. PREREQ: MAT 2300 , MAT 2600 ; PREREQ/COREQ: MAT 3150 .

  
  • MAT 3750. Methods for Teaching Algebra (3 credits)


    Designed to deepen and expand the student’s knowledge of methods, materials, and assessment practices related to teaching algebraic concepts at the middle and secondary level. This course is designed as a pre-service course for teachers and may not be used as an advanced MAT or CSC requirement. PREREQ: MAT 2500 .

  
  • MAT 4000. Methods of Teaching Mathematics in Middle Grades and Secondary Schools (3 credits)


    Crosslisted: (EDN 4000)
    Presents modern techniques, methods, materials, and assessment practices in the teaching of mathematics. Directed observation in middle or high school mathematics classes. Laboratory work provides experience in developing lesson plans that utilize materials and methods appropriate for classroom use. PREREQ: MAT 2500 .

  
  • MAT 4020. A Historical Development of Mathematics (3 credits)


    A study of the development of mathematics in its historical setting from its earliest beginnings to modern times. Note: This course may not be used as an Advanced Mathematics requirement for the major in Mathematics. PREREQ: MAT 2210  or MAT 2150 .

  
  • MAT 4110. College Geometry (3 credits)


    A rigorous development of metric and synthetic approaches to Euclidean and non-Euclidean geometries using an axiomatic format. Similarities and differences among definitions, axioms, theorems, and postulates of non-Euclidean geometries will be considered. The relationship of these geometries to Euclidean geometry will also be studied. PREREQ: MAT 2300 ; PREREQ/COREQ: MAT 3150 .

  
  • MAT 4150. Theory of Numbers (3 credits)


    An introduction to the properties of integers, prime and composite numbers, Fermat’s Theorem, arithmetic functions, quadratic residues, Diophantine equations, continued fractions and congruences. PREREQ: MAT 2210  or MAT 2150 .

  
  • MAT 4220. Applied Mathematics (3 credits)


    Introduction to mathematical modeling. Techniques and properties of discrete and continuous models. Case studies. PREREQ: MAT 3150  and MAT 3320 .

  
  • MAT 4310. Real Analysis I (3 credits)


    An introduction to modern mathematical analysis with careful attention to topics of elementary and intermediate calculus of one or more variables. Topics include convergence of sequences and series, mean value theorems, the Cauchy criterion, integrability. PREREQ: MAT 2300  and MAT 3310 .

  
  • MAT 4320. Real Analysis II (3 credits)


    A continuation of Advanced Calculus I including such topics as the total derivative of multi-variable functions, transformations of Rn, representations of functions by series and integrals, and uniform convergence. PREREQ: MAT 4310 .

  
  • MAT 4440. Complex Analysis (3 credits)


    Complex numbers, analytic functions, conformal mappings, contour integration, Cauchy’s theorem and integral formula. Taylor and Laurent expansions, analytic continuation, and Liouville’s theorem. PREREQ: MAT 3310 .

  
  • MAT 4490. Internship in Mathematics in the Middle and Secondary School (9 credits)


    Provides a semester-long full-time teaching experience in an off campus public school setting. Pass/Fail grading. PREREQ: MAT 4000.

  
  • MAT 4600. Connections in Mathematics III (1 credit)


    This seminar course is designed to help mathematics and mathematics education majors connect and deepen their mathematical understandings of advanced analysis and technology. Emphasis will be placed on research and communication of mathematical ideas. Major course work will include production of portfolio artifacts that represent the major’s development of understanding in the mathematics curriculum. PREREQ: MAT 3600 .

  
  • MAT 4750. Professional Seminar in Middle and Secondary Mathematics (3 credits)


    A seminar designed to parallel the full-semester student teaching experience. Emphasis will be placed on the appropriate application of methods of teaching and assessment in a clinical setting. Proper use of instructional materials, participation in the reflective teaching process, and opportunities for professional development and growth will be emphasized. PREREQ: Admission to Professional Semester.

  
  • MAT 4990. Independent Study (1-3 credits)


    Offered for mathematics majors on approval of the Department Chair.

  
  • MAT 5810. Internship in Secondary Mathematics (3 credits)


    Culminating clinical practice for Math Education initial teacher licensure. Course requirements include completion of program and licensure requirements, including full-time pre-service student internship or in-service teaching in a public-school setting in the licensure area.

  
  • MAT 6000. Thesis in Mathematics Education (3 credits)


    The student prepares a masters degree thesis in Mathematics Education under the direction of a thesis advisor from the Dept. of Math/CSC and the student’s thesis committee. Students electing to complete a thesis are still required to take the written comprehensive examinations. May be used to satisfy 3 hours of electives. PREREQ: 21 hours of Graduate Work, MAT 5000, EDN 5660, permission of Math Dept. Chair, Graduate Program Coordinator, and Graduate Dean.


Mathematics Education

  
  • MATE 5080. Technology in Mathematics Education (3 credits)


    An inservice course in the comparison and evaluation of computer hardware configurations and computer software packages for the classroom. The mechanics of setting up a computer network. A consideration of the effect that computers in the classroom have on curriculum development.

  
  • MATE 5500. Curriculum Development and Evaluation in Mathematics Education (3 credits)


    A critical study of current issues, trends, and the design and evaluation of curriculum in mathematics education. Students will develop, use, and evaluate a teaching unit as a major part of the work in this course. Required of all master’s candidates in mathematics education.

  
  • MATE 5530. Teaching Critical Thinking and Problem-Solving Techniques (3 credits)


    This course strengthens the student’s mathematical problem‑solving ability by extensive work with non‑routine problems that can be solved by elementary methods. General strategies for creative problem‑solving will be emphasized. Meaningful ways of dealing with such problems in the secondary school classroom will constitute a significant part of the course. Required of all master’s candidates in mathematics education.

  
  • MATE 5600. Advanced Classroom Instruction in Mathematics Education (3 credits)


    An advanced study of the theoretical bases of mathematical instruction, including philosophical and psychological concerns. Instructional theories from the field of mathematics education will be examined, together with the research that supports these theories.

  
  • MATE 5660. Advanced Educational Research in Mathematics Education (3 credits)


    Emphasis is on understanding research designs and methods in mathematics education. Students will apply statistical methods to interpret and present data in a professional research method. Students will use experience gained here to develop a comprehensive research-based project as their capstone experience.

  
  • MATE 5990. Professional Development and Leadership Seminar (3 credits)


    A capstone experience for mathematics teachers. Candidates will successfully complete a comprehensive research-based project in mathematics education by integrating knowledge gained throughout the program into a final conceptual framework. The project may take the form of a thesis or a comprehensive portfolio and will incorporate educational research. This project will include the candidate’s plans for future professional development. Each candidate will give an oral presentation of his or her completed comprehensive project for review by the graduate faculty in the mathematics department.


Mathematics Graduate

  
  • MATH 5060. Statistics and Probability (3 credits)


    The emphasis of this course will be on understanding various statistical concepts and techniques including measures of central tendency, correlation coefficients, hypothesis testing, analysis of variance, and inferential statistics. The fundamentals of probability that will be discussed include univariate and multivariate distributions, expectation, conditional distributions, and the law of large numbers.

  
  • MATH 5110. Advanced Topics in Geometry (3 credits)


    Topics chosen to improve the secondary mathematics teacher’s mastery, breadth of knowledge, and appreciation of classical geometry. Content variable, but chosen to minimize duplication with recent and current MAT 4110  classes.

  
  • MATH 5210. Analysis I (3 credits)


    A brief survey of the principal ideas and techniques of Calculus. Intended as a refresher course for high school teachers who feel the need for an understanding of Calculus in order to prepare their students for college work.

  
  • MATH 5220. Analysis II (3 credits)


    A continuation of MATH 5210 . This course continues developing the principal ideas and techniques of Calculus. Advanced topics covered may include selected topics from the real number system involving open and closed sets, covering properties, Borel sets. Additional topics: measurable sets and measurable functions, Lebesque measure and integration, and LP spaces.

  
  • MATH 5410. Advanced Topics in Abstract Algebra (3 credits)


    Two- and three-dimensional linear algebra over the numbers; geometric interpretations; and topics from group, ring, and field theory that have implications to the secondary curriculum.

  
  • MATH 5420. Special Topics in Discrete Mathematics (3 credits)


    This course will cover applications of Discrete Mathematics and such discrete techniques as are currently found at the secondary level. This course will also cover content chosen from classical Number Theory that extends beyond what students learned in undergraduate courses.


Special Topics in Mathematics

  
  • MATS 4xxx. Special Topics (Variable Title) (1-3 credits)


    A study of special topics in mathematics or mathematics education. May be repeated to a maximum of 6 hours. PREREQ: Permission of instructor.


Mass Communication

  
  • MCM 2100. Introduction to Mass Communication (3 credits)


    Examination of channels used to communicate with mass audiences in the United States, with emphasis on developments in books, newspapers, magazines, film, radio, television, and the World Wide Web. Includes news, advertising, public relations, New Media, and global communications concepts and the social, cultural, political, and economic impacts of media on society. Controls on media will be described, and media theories will be explored.  MASS COMM MAJORS OR MINORS MUST EARN A ‘C’ OR HIGHER IN THIS COURSE TO GRADUATE.

  
  • MCM 2400. Writing for the Media (3 credits)


    An introduction to mass media writing formats, styles, and conventions for print journalism, broadcasting, and public relations. The basic formats, techniques, and professional principles needed to develop skills in writing news stories, press releases, broadcast, advertising, and Web copy. MASS COMM MAJORS OR MINORS MUST EARN A ‘C’ OR HIGHER IN THIS COURSE TO GRADUATE. PREREQ: ENG 1060

  
  • MCM 2500. Film Appreciation (3 credits)


    A holistic examination of feature films and their impact on culture and society. While emphasis is given to the American film experience, global perspectives will also be examined. Course foundations begin with the evolution of film and the historical development of the discursive techniques used to convey meaning to audiences. Topics regarding the aesthetics of films (mise en scene, kinetics, narrative, etc.) and examination of film as a commercial industry will follow.

  
  • MCM 3000. World Media (3 credits)


    This course compares mass media systems in select countries or regions to reveal differences and similarities in purpose, economy, regulation, and reception by their national and international audiences. Theories of media and society, including normative theories of media, are related to the diverse cultural traditions and political regimes in which mass communication occurs around the world. PREREQ: MCM 2100  or GGY 2000 /WLS 2000  or PLS 2510 /WLS 2510 .

  
  • MCM 3100. New Media of Mass Communication (3 credits)


    An introduction to the emerging media of mass communication that employ online and social media technologies, including best practices and theoretical perspectives as they are used in the operations of converged media industries, including news and entertainment environments. The course introduces systems such as blogging and micro-blogging, social networking, image and video sharing, collaborative wikis, digital storytelling, virtual reality worlds, and others along with the concepts of citizen journalism, rich media, and other contemporary topics. The course also investigates ethics and diversity issues surrounding the technologies and their social, cultural, and political impact.

 

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