Dec 05, 2021  
The University of North Carolina at Pembroke 2017-2018 Catalog 
    
The University of North Carolina at Pembroke 2017-2018 Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Social Work

  
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    SWK 4550. Treatment of Alcohol and Drug Addiction (3 credits)


    Crosslisted: (SAB 4550)
    Substance abuse treatment and rehabilitation involving individual clients, families and groups is addressed. Modalities of treatment, treatment planning, case management and managed care in addictions are also addressed.

  
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    SWK 4600. Social Justice and Practice Ethics (3)


    This course provides students with the opportunity to explore and apply ethics, values, policies and theories of organization that are important for understanding ethical social work decision making and social and economic justice. Students will integrate theory and practice by reviewing ethical dilemmas, value conflicts, and social injustices related to social work practice and populations. A central focus of this course is the examination and analysis of the relationship between social forces (e.g. politics, social inequities, socioeconomic status) and populations at risk. PREREQ: Admission to BSW Program, SWK 2000, SWK 2450, SWK 3450, SWK 3480, SWK 3600, SWK 3710, SWK 3800, and SWK 3850; and a minimum overall QPA of 2.5

  
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    SWK 4700. Social Work Practice with Individuals with Disabilities (3)


    This course introduces the student to the emerging, multidisciplinary field of disabilities. This course will teach the social construction of disabilities, which is distinct from a medical model of disabilities. Included are definitions, early history of disabilities, the disability rights movements and eugenics, policies that impacts people with disabilities, legal issues, self-advocacy, and disability culture with a focus on disabilities across the life span. Empowerment and ecological perspectives are integrated into course content, enabling students to develop an appreciation for the power and value of understanding and supporting clients in their various contexts, social networks, and environments. PREREQ: SWK 2000 or permission of instructor

  
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    SWK 4800. Social Work Practice III (3 credits)


    This course is designed to further develop students' generalist social work skill. Practice content also emphasizes professional relationships that are characterized by mutuality, collaboration, and respect for the clients. This course includes content regarding knowledge, values and skills to enhance the well-being of people and to help ameliorate the environmental conditions that affect people adversely. Practice content also includes approaches to and skills for practice with clients from differing social, cultural, racial, religious, spiritual, and class backgrounds, and with systems of all sizes. PREREQ: SWK 2000; SWK 2450 ; SWK 3450 ; SWK 3480 ; SWK 3600; SWK 3710; SWK 3800; SWK 3850 ; formal acceptance into the BSW Program; and a minimum overall QPA of 2.5.

  
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    SWK 4900. Field Work (9 credits)


    Each student will complete a minimum of 32 hours per week in an assigned supervised field setting. Successful completion of a minimum of 400 clock hours is required at the end of the semester in order to receive a passing grade [see http://www.uncp.edu/sw/fieldexp.html for more details]. The field work experience is designed to facilitate professional development as well as to integrate social work skills, knowledge, and values. Pass/Fail basis. PREREQ: SWK 2000 , SWK 2450 , SWK 3450 , SWK 3480 , SWK 3600 , SWK 3710 , SWK 3800 , SWK 3850 , SWK 3910 , SWK 4450 , SWK 4600, SWK 4800 ; formal acceptance into the BSW Program; a minimum overall QPA of 2.5; and permission of instructor. Students may only enroll in 12 hours during their field work.

  
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    SWK 4910. Integrative Seminar for Field Work (3 credits)


    This course will focus on the transition from student to entry level professional. Each student will engage in field work activity that will allow the development of generalist skills; will explore multi cultural/lifestyle and practice issues and will present a case in order to demonstrate the integration of social work skills, knowledge and values. Each student will demonstrate the development of professional communication skills and will be able to function in a human service setting. PREREQ: SWK 2000 , SWK 2450 , SWK 3450 , SWK 3480 , SWK 3600 , SWK 3710 , SWK 3800 , SWK 3850 , SWK 3910 , SWK 4450, SWK 4600, SWK 4800 ; formal acceptance into the BSW Program; a minimum overall QPA of 2.5; and permission of instructor. Students may only enroll in 12 hours during their field work.

  
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    SWK 4970. Experiential Learning II (3 credits)


    Written acceptance by a supervising faculty member is required. The student's written proposal, together with the faculty member's acceptance, is submitted for approval to the Program Director prior to registration.

  
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    SWK 5000. Micro Human Behavior and the Social Environment (3 credits)


    This course reflects a critical perspective on understanding individuals, families, and their interpersonal and group relationships; lifespan development; theories of well-being, stress, coping and adaptation. The emphasis within this course is on knowledge about individuals and small social systems and the implications of this knowledge for all domains of social work practice. Major components will be concerned with the processes of oppression, privilege, and discrimination and factors that help people and small social systems change. PREREQ: Admission to Graduate School.

  
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    SWK 5010. Foundation Field I External Supervision (0)


    Students who are assigned to a field site that does not have a credentialed field supervisor are required to complete a section of MSW external field supervisor in conjunction with field practicum and seminar. SWK 5010 Foundation Field I External Supervision must be taken concurrently with SWK 5300 Foundation Field I and Seminar. SWK 5010 is the first of four external supervisor experiences that enable students to apply master's level coursework in a generalist practice setting. Students, site supervisors, field seminar instructors and external MSW supervisors collaborate to plan activities that will support the development of generalist/advanced skills as specified in individualized learning contracts. External MSW supervisors and students meet on a regular basis throughout the semester in order to integrate practice and theory, resolve ethical dilemmas and develop professional identity. COREQ: SWK 5300 Foundation Practicum I and Seminar

  
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    SWK 5020. Foundation Field II External Supervision (0)


    Students who are assigned to a field site that does not have a credentialed field supervisor are required to complete a section of MSW external field supervisor in conjunction with field practicum and seminar. SWK 5020 Foundation Field I External Supervision must be taken concurrently with SWK 5400 Foundation Field I and Seminar. SWK 5020 is the second of four external supervisor experiences that enable students to apply master's level coursework in a generalist practice setting.  Students, site supervisors, field seminar instructors and external MSW supervisors collaborate to plan activities that will support the development of generalist/advanced skills as specified in individualized learning contracts. External MSW supervisors and students meet on a regular basis throughout the semester in order to integrate practice and theory, resolve ethical dilemmas and develop professional identity. COREQ: SWK 5400

  
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    SWK 5030. Concentration Field I External Supervision (0)


    Students who are assigned to a field site that does not have a credentialed field supervisor are required to complete a section of MSW external field supervisor in conjunction with field practicum and seminar. SWK 5030 Concentration Field I External Supervision must be taken concurrently with SWK 5500 Concentration Field I and Seminar. SWK 5030 is the third of four external supervisor experiences that enable students to apply master's level coursework in a generalist practice setting. Students, site supervisors, field seminar instructors and external MSW supervisors collaborate to plan activities that will support the development of generalist/advanced skills as specified in individualized learning contracts. External MSW supervisors and students meet on a regular basis throughout the semester in order to integrate practice and theory, resolve ethical dilemmas and develop professional identity. COREQ: SWK 5500

  
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    SWK 5040. Concentration Field II External Supervision (0)


    Students who are assigned to a field site that does not have a credentialed field supervisor are required to complete a section of MSW external field supervisor in conjunction with field practicum and seminar. SWK 5040 Concentration Field II External Supervision must be taken concurrently with SWK 5800 Foundation Field I and Seminar. SWK 5040 is the fourth of four external supervisor experiences that enable students to apply master's level coursework in a generalist practice setting. Students, site supervisors, field seminar instructors and external MSW supervisors collaborate to plan activities that will support the development of generalist/advanced skills as specified in individualized learning contracts. External MSW supervisors and students meet on a regular basis throughout the semester in order to integrate practice and theory, resolve ethical dilemmas and develop professional identity. COREQ: SWK 5800

  
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    SWK 5050. Foundations of Social Work Practice (3 credits)


    This course provides the context for advanced generalist social work practice. Students will learn about the historical development of the social work profession. The course offers an overview of contemporary social work practice and the need for social services in a modern society. It reviews social work methods and fields of practice with an emphasis on professional values and ethics. The objectives are realized through an Ethical Dilemma Paper, a person model of advanced generalist social work practice paper, class discussions, and experiential exercises. PREREQ: Admission to Graduate School.

  
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    SWK 5060. Social Work Practice With Individuals (3 credits)


    This course emphasizes social work concepts and fundamental skills of practice with individuals and their families. Students will learn a problem solving process that includes problem identification, needs and strengths assessments, planning, intervention, termination, and evaluation. Skills in relationship building, interviewing, and recording and documentation will be reviewed. Knowledge and skills relevant to practice with populations at risk including women, people of color, those who are gay and lesbian, and/or are economically impoverished will be emphasized. Issues of oppression, diversity, social justice, values, and ethics will be integrated throughout the course. Attention will also be given to the evolution of social work practice from an historical perspective. PREREQ: Admission to Graduate School.

  
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    SWK 5070. Social Welfare Policies and Analysis (3 credits)


    This course provides students with an overview of the history and development of social policy and programs in the United States. Students will learn how to analyze contemporary social policy issues and social programs and to understand the relationship between social policy and law. The course focuses on political, economic, and other social conditions that influence policy and law with an emphasis on social justice. Students will learn basic legal research and will become familiar with laws that provide the foundation for many social policies. Students will develop skills necessary to function within the legal system on behalf of various vulnerable populations. PREREQ: Admission to Graduate School.

  
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    SWK 5080. Advanced Generalist Practice in Rural Settings (3 credits)


    This course presents the unique challenges to social work with populations in rural settings, with an emphasis on rural areas of North Carolina. The course will examine the history of the rural experience and how it is affected by changes in the ethnic, economic, technological, and political landscape. The course will include implications of these changes for the practice of social work using an advanced generalist approach. PREREQ: Admission to Graduate School.

  
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    SWK 5100. Generalist Social Work Research (3 credits)


    The purpose of this course is to increase students' knowledge of various research and evaluation methods that can be used in social work settings across a number of populations and modalities. The course will focus on how ethics apply to research and evaluation, how research problems are formulated, how hypotheses or research questions are derived, and the specific designs that researchers may use in addressing specific research topics. Students will learn the processes involved in carrying out social work research, examine social work research issues, evaluate research findings, and assess research. PREREQ: SWK 3910  or a statistics course.

  
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    SWK 5130. Advanced Standing Bridge Course-Research Module (2 credits)


    This course is for advanced standing students in the Social Work Department: students who have completed the Bachelor of Social Work degree from an accredited social work program. This course is designed to provide a conceptual orientation for the Advanced Generalist concentration year. Students will enhance their skills in evaluation, appraisal, and application of the concepts, design, and process of applied research in social work, focusing on foundation skills in conducting empirical research within the context of theory, literature review, research design and measurement, research ethics, and professional practice. PREREQ: Acceptance into Advanced Standing or permission of instructor.

  
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    SWK 5150. Macro Human Behavior and the Social Environment (3 credits)


    This course stimulates student thinking about the role of privileged and oppressed statuses and their influence on human development. This emphasis is supported by the NASW Code of Ethics, which states: "Social workers should obtain education about and seek to understand the nature of social diversity and oppression with respect to race, ethnicity, national origin, color, sex, sexual orientation, age, marital status, political belief, religion, and mental or physical disability" (NASW Code of Ethics, 1.05c). PREREQ: Admission to Graduate School.

  
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    SWK 5200. Social Work in a Diverse Community (3 credits)


    This course is designed to present students with an overview of the complex issues surrounding social work with diverse populations. Students will explore the impact of sexual orientation, race, ethnicity, ability, and/or gender, and examine the consequences of marginalizing members of oppressed groups. Students will play an active role in their own learning through the use of writing, electronic discussion groups, and other experiential exercises. PREREQ: Admission to Graduate School.

  
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    SWK 5300. Foundation Practicum I and Seminar (3 credits)


    This is the first course of two foundation practica that enable students to apply master's level coursework in a generalist practice setting. Students, agency supervisors, and faculty field instructors plan activities that will support the development of generalist skills as specified in individualized learning contracts. Students will be exposed to a variety of social work roles and responsibilities. The graduate field instruction includes a seminar that will meet four times throughout the semester. The purpose of the seminar will be for students to share field experiences and to relate them to real world experiences. Open to MSW students only. PREREQ: Admission to Graduate School and Research

  
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    SWK 5320. Community Development and Social Planning in Rural Communities (3 credits)


    This course examines methods of organizing people for social and political advocacy on their own behalf or on behalf of others to bring about change in rural communities. Rural community advocacy is an empowering process to bring together underrepresented groups to generate power and create a more socially just society. This course builds on the foundation course work.

  
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    SWK 5400. Foundation Practicum II and Seminar (3 credits)


    This is the second course of two foundation practica that enable students to apply master's level coursework in a generalist practice setting. Students, agency supervisors, and faculty field instructors plan activities that will support the development of generalist skills as specified in individualized learning contracts. Students will be exposed to a variety of social work roles and responsibilities. The graduate field instruction includes a seminar that will meet four times throughout the semester. The purpose of the seminar will be for students to share field experiences and to relate them to real world experiences. Open to MSW students only. PREREQ: Admission to Graduate School and SWK 5300 .

  
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    SWK 5410. Social Work Practice Administration in Rural Settings (3 credits)


    The purpose of this course is to equip students to perform a variety of management functions in a broad range of human service organizations and other non-profits. The course will focus on areas that include the role of the manager, theories of management, specific approaches to management of the organization, motivating workers, management of data, information and budgets, and supervision. Emphasis will be on the integration of theory and the practical application of management tools and techniques for effective functioning of the organization. This course builds on the foundation course work. PREREQ: Admission to the Graduate School

  
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    SWK 5430. Advanced Generalist Practice with Individuals and Families (3 credits)


    This course examines practice with individuals and families. Mastery of tasks that enhance social functioning will be examined. Students will learn effective strength-based interviewing skills. The course will also address family and community-centered assessment within an ecological framework. Special attention is given to the needs of families affected by poverty and oppression in rural communities. PREREQ: SWK 5060  or Advanced Standing.

  
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    SWK 5450. Advanced Generalist Intervention Research (3 credits)


    The purpose of this course is to provide students with a thorough understanding of the research design techniques necessary to evaluate the effects of services on clients, community needs, and address the needs for accountability, as well as practice evaluation. The themes of diversity and social work values and ethics are addressed in relation to macro research methods, program evaluation, and community-based research. Attention is placed on diversity concerns related to indigenous populations. This course covers the applications of research design techniques to data collection in human service agencies and communities, including the use of statistical analysis for program evaluation and needs assessment. PREREQ: Admission to Graduate School and SWK 5100  or SWK 5130 .

  
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    SWK 5500. Concentration Practicum I and Seminar (4 credits)


    This is the first practicum in the concentration curriculum. This course enables students to apply Advanced Generalist master's level coursework in an advanced generalist practice setting. Students, agency supervisors and faculty field instructors plan activities that will support the development of generalist skills as specified in individualized learning contracts. Students will be exposed to a variety of social work roles and responsibilities. Open to MSW students only. PREREQ: SWK 5300  and SWK 5400  or Advanced Standing.

  
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    SWK 5580. Advanced Generalist Social Work Practice with Groups and Organizations in Rural Communities (3 credits)


    This advanced generalist course builds on the content presented during the foundation year. It focuses on the processes of intervention in task and individual change groups. Particular attention will be given to the recruitment and composition of group members, leadership structure of small groups and organizations, phases of group development, and such group processes as decision-making, tension reduction, conflict resolution, goal setting, contracting, and evaluation in the rural setting. Organizational theories will be covered as well. Theories that support social justice will be emphasized. The course will also consider how gender, ethnicity, race, social class, sexual orientation, and different abilities will impact on various aspects of group functioning such as purpose, composition, leadership, selection of intervention strategies, and group development. A variety of experiential assignments and exercises will be used to help students enhance their leadership knowledge and skills. PREREQ: Admission to the Graduate Program and SWK 5060  or Advanced Standing.

  
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    SWK 5600. Advanced Clinical Assessment and Intervention Methods (3 credits)


    An advanced course in the assessment skills required for professional social work practice in mental health and other clinical settings. The course will focus on clinical assessment as described in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, DSM IV-TR. Students will be expected to become conversant with the clinical descriptions used in mental health diagnosis and to master the basic assessment skills required of social workers in clinical settings. Students will apply assessment knowledge and skills in planning practical and effective treatment strategies. Clinical assessment skills are not only necessary for the social worker in many areas of direct practice but are of use to all social workers as they deal with other helping professionals (i.e., psychiatrists, psychologists, school counselors, etc.). This may be particularly true in rural settings where the social work generalist may be called upon to function in multiple roles and fields of practice. PREREQ: SWK 5060  or Advanced Standing.

  
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    SWK 5700. Child Welfare (Rural/Indigenous Communities) (3 credits)


    This course is designed to provide practice knowledge and skills for students preparing for positions in public child welfare. The competencies taught in the course will also give social workers in a variety of settings that serve children a better understanding of the child welfare system and its services in North Carolina. The course is designed to acquaint the student with the tools and techniques necessary to enhance their ability to think critically in a variety of situations and experiences. PREREQ: Admission to the MSW Program.

  
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    SWK 5710. Grant Writing (3 credits)


    This course will seek to develop research and grant writing skills and competencies to aid the student in assisting communities, Community Based Organizations, non-profit agencies, etc., in meeting the needs of the communities and/or associated publics. The focus of this course is the practical application of social analysis, critical thinking, and the development of related skill-sets such as community mapping/research, resource identification, program planning/development, capacity building, and change/intervention strategies to aid in the creation of grant proposals designed to address specific community or constituency needs. Students should expect a major time investment in regards to research, writing, and weekly group discussions/activities. PREREQ: Admission to Graduate School.

  
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    SWK 5800. Concentration Practicum II and Seminar (5 credits)


    This is the second practicum in the concentration year. This course enables students to apply Advanced Generalist master's level coursework in an advanced generalist practice setting. Students, agency supervisors, and faculty field instructors plan activities that will support the development of generalist skills as specified in individualized learning contracts. Students will be exposed to a variety of social work roles and responsibilities. Open to MSW students only. PREREQ: SWK 5300 , SWK 5400 , SWK 5500  or Advanced Standing.

  
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    SWK 6200. Assessment and Treatment of Substance Abuse Disorder (3 credits)


    Our understandings of substance use, dependence, abuse, and treatment are some of the most rapidly evolving and also controversial areas of knowledge in the mental health and medical fields. This course is designed to cover the key content necessary for developing a comprehensive understanding of a complex body of knowledge that is filled with certainties and uncertainties, science and speculation, dogma and theory, as well as opinion and silence. It will also provide students with a reflective grasp of a confusing body of knowledge. Topics covered include ethnocultural influences in addiction, sociocultural aspects of addiction, definitions of addiction, profiles in addiction, substances of addiction, models of treatment, family work, group support and self-medication theories of addiction.

  
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    SWK 6300. Human Trafficking in the US (3 credits)


    This course emphasizes social work practice in relation to the various forms of human trafficking within the United States. Students will learn relevant terminology, the process of human trafficking, and the systemic effects on those who are victimized. Knowledge and skills relevant to trauma-focused practice and interventions at various levels of social work practice will be emphasized. The role of systemic factors including culture and social media will be explored.

  
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    SWK 6400. Forensic Social Work (3 credits)


    This course develops the understanding of the role of social workers with clients within the criminal justice system and legal system. This course will focus on theory, practice, intervention, and advocacy with diverse forensic populations including offenders, victims, juveniles, and related systems. The role of social workers as expert witnesses, in child welfare, etc., is also explored. This course assumes a justice-oriented multisystems and interdisciplinary approach.

  
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    SWK 6500. Military Social Work (3 credits)


    This course introduces the student to the complexities involved in military culture, combat and postwar experience. It analyzes the field of military social work practice placing particular emphasis on the diversity of military/veteran families, their resiliencies, and challenges in modern societies. The course has an empowerment, family-centered focus and aims to advance a non-judgmental, culturally- sensitive, ethical understanding and treatment of military personnel/veterans and their families. The importance of creativity and innovation in designing and evaluating theory-grounded, practiceinformed micro-, mezzo-, and macro-level interventions, adherence to professional ethics, and adoption of best-evidence modalities in the field are also highly accentuated.

  
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    SWK 6600. Advanced Social Work Practice in Integrative Healthcare (3)


    The course will introduce students to the essential practice skills needed to effectively address the challenges of integrating services, care, and support for persons with health, mental health, and substance use problems. Students will become fluent in the language and culture of health and will develop a working knowledge of a wide variety of chronic health conditions. Students will examine the challenges of multidisciplinary team practice and current best practices for effective interventions.

  
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    SWK 6700. Integrated Health Policy and Services (3)


    The purpose of this course is to provide intensive study of the evolution of the integration of Primary Care and Behavioral Health services and to provide an opportunity for synthesis and application of learning and practice of policy in this service arena. The content of the course reflects the values of the social work profession and focuses on the role of the "social policy practitioner" in assisting individuals in the maintenance or attainment of optimal health and mental health, social and economic justice, and recovery and wellness. Theories related to organizational structure and change within an Integrated Behavioral Health environment and strategies for practitioners to influence policies and promote change in the interest of service consumer, agency, and society will be presented. The course will provide the knowledge and skills necessary for direct involvement in the political and organizational processes used to influence policy and delivery systems. PREREQ: Admission to MSW Program

  
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    SWK 6710. Advanced Practice with Indigenous Populations (3)


    This course asks the student to examine the cultural identities of the Indigenous people, examining their traditional values, cultural-based behaviors, and the effects of colonialism and imperialism due to the consequences of social policies/legislation and social work practice research.  Attention will be given to the cultural-specific skills and approaches particular to traditional and current helping practices from an Indigenous worldview. PREREQ: Acceptance into the Advanced Standing MSW program.

  
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    SWK 6800. International Social Work and Social Development (3)


    This course exposes students to theories, perspectives, and strategies of social work practice and social development in less-industrialized, non-Western countries. Students will explore the historical, sociocultural, economic, and environmental factors that influence social service delivery in selected countries in Asia, Africa, Latin America, and the South Pacific. The course will also explore the impact of globalization on social service delivery and strategies. The course will cover the roles social workers and social welfare organization play in the selected countries. Students will have opportunity to learn about various social work intervention strategies employed in the geographic regions covered. PREREQ: Admission to MSW program


Special Topics in Social Work

  
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    SWKS 4xxx. Special Topics in Social Work (3 credits)


    This course is to provide flexibility to introduce specialized courses which may be of substantial interest to students. Topics will vary from time to time according to student interest.

  
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    SWKS 6xxx. Special Topics in Social Work (3 credits)


    These courses will exam a special area or topic of relevance within the field of social work. Topics to be considered will be announced prior to registration and may vary. This course may be repeated for different topics. PREREQ: Permission of Instructor.


Teaching English as a Second Language

  
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    TESL 4890. Applied Pedagogy of Teaching English as a Second Language (3 credits)


    Following a review of the pedagogical fundamentals grounded in cognitive, affective, and linguistic principles of second language acquisition, this course will focus on the practical realities of the language classroom, including curriculum development, lesson planning, evaluation of students and programs, and classroom management. PREREQ: ENG 3460 , ENG 3710 , ENG 4810 , ENG 4830 , ENG 4850  or permission of instructor.

  
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    TESL 5810. Internship in TESOL (3 credits)


    Ten week, full-time internship experiences in an off-campus public school setting appropriate for K-12 ESL licensure. PREREQ: Approval of the English Education Program Director.

  
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    TESL 5890. Applied Pedagogy of Teaching English as a Second Language (3 credits)


    Following a review of the pedagogical fundamentals grounded in cognitive, affective, and linguistic principles of second language acquisition, this course will focus on the practical realities of the language classroom, including curriculum development, lesson planning, evaluation of students and programs, and classroom management. PREREQ: ENG 3460 , ENG 3710 , ENG 5810 , ENG 5830 , ENG 5850  or permission of instructor.


Theatre

  
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    THE 1620. Introduction to Theatre Technology (1 credit)


    An introduction to the practices of theatre production, including: the plan and function of the physical facility; safety procedures in the costume shop, scene shop, and on stage; appropriate use of theatre tools, stage rigging, lighting and sound equipment; and other elements of theatrical production. This course will be taught by several members of the theatre faculty.

  
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    THE 1640. Stage Make‑Up (1 credit)


    Theory and practice in the application of make‑up for the stage using practical make‑up application for class exercises.

  
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    THE 1810. Stage Dance I (1 credit)


    Crosslisted: (PED 1810)
    Basic dance technique for the stage.

  
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    THE 1820. Stage Dance II (1credit)


    Crosslisted: (PED 1820)
    Basic dance technique for the stage. PREREQ: THE 1810 Permission of instructor.

  
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    THE 2010. Acting I: Fundamentals (3 credits)


    Introduction to fundamental acting concepts, including the understanding of self-expression and understanding dramatic texts in terms of goals, obstacles and action. Acting processes are explored through classroom exercises and scene work.

  
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    THE 2020. Theatre Practicum (Wardrobe/Makeup Crew) (1 credit)


    Participate as a member of wardrobe crew with the possibility of advancement to assignments such as wardrobe or makeup assistant, wardrobe or makeup supervisor, and/or an assistant to the faculty member by serving as assistant costume designer, with appropriate faculty supervision. This is a lab course requiring approximately 40 hours over the semester. May be repeated for up to four credit hours.

  
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    THE 2040. Theatre Practicum (Production Crew) (1 credit)


    Participate as a member of one of the standard stage crews, such as scene shifting, props, light board operator, and/or sound board operator, with the possibility of advancement to assignments such as scenic artist, sound engineer, shop foreman, and/or property master/mistress, with appropriate faculty supervision. This is a lab course requiring approximately 40 hours over the semester. May be repeated for up to four credit hours.

  
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    THE 2060. Theatre Practicum (Shop and Lighting Crew) (1 credit)


    Participation in light hang/focus, set construction and strike, with the possibility of advancement to master electrician, and/or assistant lighting designer, with appropriate faculty supervision. This is a lab course requiring approximately 40 hours over the semester. May be repeated for up to four credit hours.

  
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    THE 2070. Stage Combat (3 credits)


    Introduction to staged violence, armed and unarmed combat. PREREQ: THE 1810 or permission of instructor. Permission of Instructor required

  
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    THE 2080. Theatre Practicum (Assistant Stage Manager/Stage Manager) (2 credits)


    Participation in production as assistant stage manager, with possible advancement to assignments such as Stage Manager, to include assistance with poster design, house management, program layout and design, with appropriate faculty supervision. May be repeated for up to four credit hours. PREREQ: THE 1620 and THE 2350 or permission of instructor.

  
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    THE 2100. Theatre Practicum (Acting) (1 credit)


    Participate as a cast member in a University Theatre production. May be repeated for up to three credit hours. PREREQ: BY AUDITION ONLY.

  
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    THE 2110. Script Analysis (3 credits)


    Focusing on an Aristotle-based formalist script analysis and Stanislavski-based action analysis of modern plays.  The course is designed for actors, directors, stage managers and designers.

  
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    THE 2150. Theatre Showcase (1 credit)


    Participation in opportunities for Theatre majors to create, produce, perform, design and serve as audience for student driven theatre projects under faculty supervision. May be repeated for up to eight credit hours. PREREQ: Must be a declared Theatre major.

  
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    THE 2330. Stagecraft (3 credits)


    Study of theories and techniques used in creating a stage environment. Students will participate in various aspects of production as a practical supplement to classroom lectures. PREREQ: THE 1620.

  
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    THE 2340. Scene Painting (3 credits)


    Development of basic and advanced skills in scenic painting techniques through studio projects. PREREQ: THE 1620.

  
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    THE 2350. Stage Management (3 credits)


    Theory and practice of stage management in Broadway, regional, community, and educational theaters. To include the stage manager's responsibilities during rehearsals as well as during performances.

  
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    THE 2360. Costume Technology (3 credits)


    Principles and theories of costume construction for theatrical productions.

  
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    THE 2500. Introduction to Theatre (3 credits)


    Introduction to both theatre practice and literature; survey of artists of the theatre and dramatic literature from Ancient Greece to the present.

  
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    THE 2810. Stage Dance III (2 credits)


    Further development of technical skills in jazz, modern, and other stage dance styles, including increased movement capabilities, rhythmic accuracy, and spatial relationships, with emphasis on aesthetic and expressive qualities that lead to performance. PREREQ: THE 1820 or Permission of instructor.

  
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    THE 2820. Stage Dance IV (2 credits)


    Further development of technical skills in jazz, modern, and other stage dance styles, including increased movement capabilities, rhythmic accuracy, and spatial relationships, with emphasis on aesthetic and expressive qualities that lead to performance. PREREQ: THE 2810 or Permission of instructor.

  
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    THE 2830. Lighting Technology (3 credits)


    Study of the theories and techniques used in the repair, maintenance and application of lighting instrumentation and technology for stage productions. Students will participate in various aspects of production as a practical supplement to classroom lectures. 

  
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    THE 3010. Acting II: Characterization (3 credits)


    Continued development in areas previously explored. Emphasis on the actor's instrument, including: appearance, speech and movement capabilities, emotional depths, intelligence, mind-body combination, sense of timing, sense of drama and presentational skills. These areas are explored through classroom exercises and scene and monologue work. PREREQ: THE 2010 .

  
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    THE 3020. Props Design and Technology (3 credits)


    Development of basic and advanced skills in script analysis, prop research, and building techniques to enable students to provide props for productions. PREREQ: THE 1620

  
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    THE 3040. Creative Drama (3 credits)


    Principles and practices of organizing and directing creative drama and children's theatre activities in the classroom and in the community.

  
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    THE 3170. Dialects for the Stage (1 credit)


    An overview of regional American and international geographically-specific speech dialects. A series of written, recorded, and oral assignments will provide students with the ability to master specific dialects for performance on stage or film.

  
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    THE 3310. Play Direction (3 credits)


    Study of the theory and practice of directing for the theatre; classroom theory supported by individual experience in selection and analysis of scripts, casting, rehearsal, and production. PREREQ: THE 2010 or permission of instructor.

  
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    THE 3330. Lighting Design (3 credits)


    Theories and principles of lighting design for theatrical productions. Conceptualization, communication, and execution of design ideas through script analysis, light studies, light plots, and related projects. PREREQ: THE 2830

  
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    THE 3340. Scene Design (3 credits)


    Theory and principles of scene design for the stage. Conceptualization and communication of design ideas through renderings, models, and technical drawings. PREREQ: THE 2330.

  
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    THE 3530. Theatre Management (3 credits)


    Theory and practice of theatre management objectives including: theatre organization, season, budget, schedule, personnel, publicity, box office, and house management.

  
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    THE 3540. Costume Design (3 credits)


    Principles and theories of costume design for theatrical productions.

  
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    THE 3600. History of the Theatre: The Beginnings to 1642 (3 credits)


    Study of the theatre, both its physical form and literature from the beginnings to 1642. PREREQ: THE 2500  or permission of instructor.

  
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    THE 3610. History of the Theatre: 1642 to the Present (3 credits)


    Study of the theatre, both its physical form and literature from 1642 to the present. PREREQ: THE 2500  or permission of instructor.

  
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    THE 3810. Choreography (3 credits)


    A practical experience focusing on the choreographer's creative process for developing dances. Emphasis will be placed on identifying, selecting, and utilizing a variety of source material through use of critical evaluation skills for dance, use of choreographic devices, use of improvisation for generating movement, creating meaning through the use of time, space, energy/force, and weight, and creation of a written personal artistic statement.

  
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    THE 4010. Acting III: Styles (3 credits)


    Continued development in areas previously explored. Emphasis on auditioning skills, including: developing initial skill in the understanding of how to audition, cold and prepared readings, period styles and developing initial skill in the understanding and expression of formal/heightened language and movement. PREREQ: THE 3010 .

  
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    THE 4030. Senior Capstone I (1 credit)


    Part one of a two-semester Senior project focusing on student's personal interest in theatre. PREREQ: Declared Senior Theatre Major.

  
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    THE 4040. Senior Capstone II (2 credits)


    Part two of a two-semester Senior project focusing on student's personal interest in theatre. PREREQ: Declared Senior Theatre Major.

  
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    THE 4050. Shakespeare and Performance (3 credits)


    Designed to use both theory and practice to discover the relevance of the language structure, themes, and literary-historical significance of specific plays and poems by Shakespeare.  PREREQ: THE 2110

  
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    THE 4110. Acting IV: Advanced Methods (3 credits)


    Emphasizing intensive techniques and advanced methods of training for the actor. PREREQ: THE 4010

  
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    THE 4530. Directed Practicum in Advanced Theatre Problems I (1-3 credits)


    Credit is earned by successful fulfillment of a contractual agreement between the student and a supervising faculty member. PREREQ: Declared junior or senior major, 3.0 grade point average in major, and permission of instructor.

  
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    THE 4540. Directed Practicum in Advanced Theatre Problems II (1-3 credits)


    Credit is earned by successful fulfillment of a contractual agreement between the student and a supervising faculty member. PREREQ: Declared junior or senior major, 3.0 grade point average in major, and permission of instructor.


Special Topics in Theatre

  
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    THES 3xxx. Special Topics in Theatre (1-3 credits)


    An in‑depth study of a selected topic in theatre or drama determined by the expertise of the instructor and the interests of the students.


University Studies

  
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    UNV 1000. Freshman Seminar (1 credit)


    General introduction to the academic substance, study methods, and special adjustment problems of university life. Conducted by faculty and staff from various departments. Required of all incoming freshmen during their first fifteen credit hours of course work at the University.

  
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    UNV 1010. Learning Community (0 credits)


    UNV 1010 is a non-credit-bearing course that allows members of a learning community to receive additional information regarding their community, interact with community members, and attend events that will strengthen their academic and social integration at UNCP. PREREQ: Admission to the Learning Community.

  
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    UNV 1050. Introduction to Career Development (2 credits)


    Students are exposed to all aspects of the career planning process, including self-assessment, decision-making related to choosing a major and identifying related career options, goal setting, career and job research, and job search tools and strategies.

  
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    UNV 1060. New Transfer Seminar (1 credit)


    A general introduction to the University consisting of policies, procedures, and resources. Students will also reflect on their academic study skills, the way they view change, and utilization of information technology.

  
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    UNV 1100. Strategies for Success (3 credits)


    This course provides opportunities for students to develop skills necessary for success in college such as critical thinking, time management, critical reading, writing and research. These skills will be taught through the use of proven learning techniques that utilize the students' current course load requirements. PREREQ: Permission of instructor.

  
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    UNV 2000. Introduction to Student Development Theory and Peer Education (3 credits)


    An introduction to student development theory and its application to college student learning and peer education using readings, lectures, classroom discussion, observation, role-playing, and group presentations.  PREREQ: Permission of instructor


World Studies

  
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    WLS 1000. University Convocation Program (1 credit)


    The World Studies Committee offers four one‑hour courses to encourage student attendance at campus lectures and cultural events. Each course is given on a Pass/Fail basis.

  
  •  

    WLS 1010. University Convocation Program (1 credit)


    The World Studies Committee offers four one‑hour courses to encourage student attendance at campus lectures and cultural events. Each course is given on a Pass/Fail basis.

  
  •  

    WLS 1020. University Convocation Program (1 credit)


    The World Studies Committee offers four one‑hour courses to encourage student attendance at campus lectures and cultural events. Each course is given on a Pass/Fail basis.

  
  •  

    WLS 1030. University Convocation Program (1 credit)


    The World Studies Committee offers four one‑hour courses to encourage student attendance at campus lectures and cultural events. Each course is given on a Pass/Fail basis.

  
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    WLS 1500. Introduction to International and Intercultural Relations (1-3 credits)


    This course is an academic and cultural introduction to the US system of higher education and the similarities and contrasts with other countries. Topics include the responsibilities of being good global citizens and adjustment issues in university life in the US and abroad. This course will prepare international or study abroad students for academic life in the US/foreign university and help develop the necessary skills to become successful global citizens.

  
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    WLS 2000. World Cultural Geography (3 credits)


    Crosslisted: (GGY 2000)
    Concept of culture applied to the human environment. Geographical variations and evolution resulting from the interaction between cultural and physical processes. Culture and technological change. Population and migration. Cultural effects on perception of the environment.

  
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    WLS 2100. Multicultural Center Internship (3 credits)


    This internship will provide students with a deeper understanding of cultural relations and the administration of a cultural center. Students may be assigned research on a cultural topic and will be required to submit papers as well as prepare a related exhibit for public display. PREREQ: Approval of World Studies Minor Coordinator and the Director of the Multicultural Center.

  
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    WLS 2510. Introduction to World Politics (3 credits)


    Crosslisted: (PSPA 2510)
    This course gives students a basic understanding of the major issues and aspects of world politics. It includes an overview of trends in world politics in the twenty-first century, considers the relevant global actors, explores the relevance of non-state actors, and focuses on the increasing importance of issues relating to global welfare. A central premise is that world politics is a combination of political, historical, economic, and sociological factors which are not static. PREREQ: PSPA 1000 or 1010.

 

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