Aug 21, 2019  
The University of North Carolina at Pembroke 2017-2018 Catalog 
    
The University of North Carolina at Pembroke 2017-2018 Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Academic Procedures and Policies



Students are expected to learn the University requirements and regulations which are applicable to them, and are individually responsible for meeting all such requirements and regulations. Before the close of each semester, the student is expected to discharge all financial obligations to the University. A student may not register for a new semester nor receive a degree, certificate, or transcript until all University bills are paid.

Undergraduate Grading And Academic Eligibility

Regulations concerning academic eligibility are subject to constant revision and change. In the event of a change all students will conform to the newer regulations.

Classification of Students

Regular students at UNCP are classified according to the number of semester hours they have earned in keeping with the following table:

Less than 30 hours‑Freshman 60 to 89 hours‑Junior
30 to 59 hours‑Sophomore 90 hours to graduation‑Senior

Grading System (Undergraduate)

Students may view their midterm and final grades on BraveWeb. Students needing a copy of their grades may print them from BraveWeb or request a transcript.

A letter grade and plus‑minus system for evaluating academic performance is used for evaluating all undergraduate students. Each letter grade has a quality point value for each semester hour it represents. The hour and quality points are used in determining a student's grade point average for a semester's work and in averaging grades for all work completed to find a student's cumulative quality point average.

Academic eligibility for a student shall be determined by current regulations. The letter grades and quality points represented by each, as of 1 January 1989, are as follows:

A = 4.0 B‑=2.7 D+ = 1.3 P = 0.0
A‑ = 3.7 C+= 2.3 D = 1.0 I , IM= 0.0
B+=3.3 C = 2.0 D‑ = 0.7 T= 0.0
B = 3.0 C‑ = 1.7 F = 0.0 W, WX, WM, or AU= 0.0

The "P" grade is earned in designated courses and carries semester hours credit. However, the hours are not counted in quality hours. Quality hours are the hours used in figuring quality point averages.

The "I," or incomplete grade, is given when a student is unable to complete required work because of an unavoidable circumstance such as illness. It is not to be given to enable a student to do additional work to improve a grade. Assigning the "I" grade is at the discretion of the individual instructor. It is the student's responsibility to request the "I" grade. Generally, the student will have completed most of the work required for the course before the "I" grade is requested. An incomplete must be removed within one semester (excluding summer term) or it will automatically be converted to a grade of "F" by the University Registrar. An "I" grade will not count toward the determination of quality hours and quality point averages and does not fulfill prerequisite requirements.

The "IM," or the military incomplete grade, is assigned for incompletes to students called to active military duty. The "IM" grade is given when students are deployed for active military duty assignments during an academic term and will be unable to complete coursework for the term through an alternative format. It is not given to enable a student to do additional work to improve a grade. The "IM" grade can be assigned with instructor approval if deployment occurs after 60% of the course (e.g. nine weeks of the fall or spring semester) has been completed for the academic term. If deployment occurs after 80% of the course (e.g. twelve weeks of the fall or spring semester) has been completed for the academic term, active duty military students are guaranteed the option of an "IM" if they so choose.  The IM grade must be removed within three years of returning from deployment or the grade will convert to a "WM." See below for more information on the "WM" grade.  The "IM" grade will not count toward the determination of quality hours and quality point averages. An "IM" does not fulfill prerequisite requirements. It is the student's responsibility to request the "IM" grade.  Refer to the Registrar's webpage at www.uncp.edu/registrar for more information about applying for the "IM."

The "T," grade pending, is given only for Esther G. Maynor Honors College courses until the thesis or project is completed.

The "W" grade is assigned when a student withdraws from a course during the designated drop‑ add period; the "WX" grade is assigned when special permission is granted to withdraw (see below, for withdrawal process). When a student receives a "W" or "WX" grade, the grade is recorded, but the semester hours attempted are not counted as quality hours.

The "WM," or the military withdrawal grade, is assigned for withdrawals of students called to active military duty during the course of an academic term. The "WM" grade is given when students are deployed for active military duty assignments during the term and will be unable to complete coursework for the term through an alternative format. While students who are deployed on active military duty assignments can opt for the "WM" grade at any point during the term, the "WM" grade will be assigned if deployment occurs before 60% of the course (e.g. nine weeks of the fall or spring semester) has been completed for the academic term and an alternative for mat for the course (such as moving to an online section) is not available. When a student receives a "WM" grade, the grade is recorded, but the semester hours attempted are not counted as quality hours.  Refer to the Registrar's webpage at www.uncp.edu/registrar for more information about applying for the "WM."

Audited classes are listed on the permanent record. They are designated by the letters "AU." The AU's and W's will be listed as attempted hours, but not as quality hours for figuring quality point averages.

Quality Point Average and Scholastic Standing

Scholastic standing at UNC Pembroke is based on the quality point average. To figure quality point average, multiply the number of quality hours (attempted hours minus P credits, AU's and W's) assigned to each course by the number of quality points received, add the quality points received for all courses, and divide by the number of quality hours.

Example:

Course Final Course Grade Quality Hours x Quality Points = Quality Points Earned
Course A C+ 3 x 2.3 = 6.9
Course B B‑ 3 x 2.7 = 8.1
Course C A 1 x 4.0 = 4.0
Course D P 0* x 0.0 = 0.0
Course E F 1 x 0.0 = 0.0
Course F B 3 x 3.0 = 9.0
Course G A‑ 3 x 3.7 = 11.1
Course H I 0 x 0.0 = 0.0
    Total       Total Quality
    Quality Hrs.       Pts. 39.1
    14        

Quality Point Average = 39.1 divided by 14 = 2.793

*A grade of P counts as hours earned but not as quality hours and is computed as 0 hours in figuring quality point averages.

A cumulative quality point average is obtained by including only the quality hours and quality points received from UNCP.

Academic Standing

A student's academic standing during any term is determined by the cumulative grade point average (GPA) earned on the total quality hours. To be in good standing, a cumulative GPA of 2.0 and a 67% or greater earned‑to‑attempted pass rate must be maintained. Individuals with less than a cumulative 2.0 GPA are placed on either probation or suspension. Individuals with less than a 67% earned-to-attempted pass rate are placed on progress warning.

Students are advised of their academic status at the end of every regular semester via email, Braveweb, and mail sent to their address on record. It is the student's responsibility to know his or her academic standing status and to ensure that an accurate mailing address is on file with the Registrar.

Progress Warning

A student is placed on Progress Warning when his or her pass rate falls below 67% but the cumulative GPA is 2.0 or higher. The pass rate is calculated by dividing the number of earned hours by the number of hours attempted at UNCP. Students on Progress Warning are not in good standing and will be advised of their status each semester until their pass rate reaches 67%.

Academic Probation

A student is placed on Academic Probation when his/her cumulative GPA falls below 2.0. Students on academic probation are eligible to attend the University while carrying a cumulate grade point average below 2.0 under specified provisions but are not in good standing.

Students on probation have two semesters to improve their academic performance.  If a student takes a leave of absence after one semester of probation, her or she would still be under probation for one semester after returning.  Enrollment for the probationary term will be limited to a maximum of 13 semester hours, and students must participate in the services for probationary students offered through the Center for Student Success (CSS). This is a mandatory requirement.  Failure to participate in CSS services will result in immediate Academic Dismissal at the end of the semester.  Students should refer to the CSS website for more information on these services.

By the end of the second probationary semester, students must achieve one of the following:

  1. Raise the cumulative GPA to a minimum of 2.0, or
  2. Earn a minimum GPA of 2.3 for the second probationary semester.

Failure to meet one of the conditions above will result in a mandatory suspension from UNCP for one semester.  Refer to the section on Academic Suspension for more information.

To return to good standing, a student must have a cumulative GPA of 2.0 or better.  A probationary student who has earned a semester GPA of 2.3 but who has not achieved a cumulative GPA of 2.0 is continued on probation.

Academic Suspension

If a student does not meet the above GPA requirement(s) during the second probationary semester, he/she will be suspended for one semester.  After the suspension semester, the student must successfully appeal (see Suspension Appeals) before applying for readmission.  If approved for readmission by the Suspension Appeals Committee, the student will be readmitted to the University for two additional semesters (Fall or Spring) on academic probation.  Failure to meet the GPA requirements at the end of the fourth semester on probation will result in Academic Dismissal from the University.

Academic Dismissal

Academic Dismissal will occur when a student fails to satisfy all of the probation requirements after returning from suspension.  Students who are placed on Academic Dismissal are ineligible to enroll at UNCP for two years.  After the two-year dismissal, the student must successfully appeal (see Suspension Appeals) before applying for readmission.  Upon return from Academic Dismissal, the student will be on Academic Probation.  Failure to meet the probation requirements will result in Academic Dismissal.         

Suspension Appeals after Completing Mandatory Suspension or Academic Dismissal

A student who wishes to be readmitted after an academic suspension or dismissal must appeal to the Suspension Appeals Committee. Specific deadlines for each term can be found on the Web sites of the Center for Student Success (CSS) and the office of Financial Aid.

Appeals are coordinated by the staff of the Center for Student Success (CSS). Individuals wishing to appeal a suspension should contact CSS to schedule a meeting with a counselor to develop an appeals packet. Complete appeals packets include, at a minimum, a letter of appeal, a Success Contract, supporting documents of personal/medical reasons for performance, and a statement of strategies/support programs that will be utilized during the semester to attain good academic standing status. No appeals will be heard if received after the deadline, and the decision of the Suspension Appeals Committee is final. . 

Students whose appeal has been denied may not appeal again unless there has been a material change to their academic record. Students whose appeal has been approved must participate in the Center for Student Success services for students on probation.  Failure to participate will result in immediate Academic Dismissal at the end of the semester.

Academic Honors

Graduation With Honors

Graduating seniors may be considered for honors if they have earned a Quality Point Average (QPA) of at least 3.4 for 45 semester hours of course work in residence at UNCP. All course work attempted (including quality hours from other institutions and repeated hours) will be included in the calculation of the cumulative QPA for determining the particular honors designation awarded. Students who attain a cumulative QPA of 3.85 or higher are graduated summa cum laude. Those who achieve a minimum cumulative QPA of 3.7 are graduated magna cum laude and students whose cumulative QPA is at least 3.4 are graduated cum laude.

Students who achieve the hours and the QPA requirement at the beginning of the last semester of their senior year will be recognized at commencement. The final assessment is done after graduation and honors are pending for all students until this is completed. The honors designation will appear on the student's diploma and transcript.

Honors/Chancellor's List

Students are eligible for Honors List if they achieve a minimum semester quality point average of 3.2 while passing at least 12 semester hours of course work; none of the 12 hours may be Pass/Fail.

Students are eligible for Chancellor's List if they achieve a minimum semester quality point average of 3.7 while passing at least 12 semester hours of course work; none of the 12 hours may be Pass/Fail.

Orientation And Advisement

New Student and Family Orientation and Testing

The Center for Student Success offers several programs during the spring and summer of each year to acquaint new students and family members with the academic, co-curricular, and social opportunities offered at the University. These programs are designed to ease the transition of incoming students and their family members to UNC Pembroke. All students who are required to attend New Student and Family Orientation will be mailed information concerning the program. In addition, freshman students are required to attend the Welcome Week in August.

Students are not required to test for placement in English and Math. Students are placed into the appropriate English course based on SAT score, ACT score, or high school experience. Any student who is placed into ENG 0104 is given the opportunity to challenge the placement in their first semester of enrollment. This placement challenge is offered during Welcome Week in the fall semester and the first week of class in the spring. Students are placed into the appropriate math course by major and advisement. Students who wish to begin in MAT 2210, Calculus I , can request a placement test from the math department to show that they can meet the expectations of the course.

Academic Advisement

New freshmen are advised by the staff of the Center for Student Success when registering for first semester courses, after which time they will be assigned faculty advisors. As soon as a student decides on a major, the student should take a Declaration of Major form to the department chair for the chosen major. The chair will assign a faculty member in the student's major as the new advisor. The student obtains the signature of the new advisor and submits the form to the Office of the Registrar in Lumbee Hall.

The advisor's role is to assist the student in planning a suitable academic program and to maintain a record of progress during the student's college career. The advisor also provides information and guidance regarding UNC Pembroke policies and procedures. However, the final responsibility for meeting all academic program requirements lies with the student. The Center for Student Success serves as a resource center for students who may wish to seek additional academic help, and faculty members may refer students to the Center.

Registration Procedures And Policies

Registration

Each student must complete registration online. No student is considered to be officially registered until the student has completed registration as outlined below. Students who fail to complete registration as prescribed will have their names dropped from all class rolls. If these students subsequently request to register, they must follow registration procedures just as if they had not started registration before.

The advisor's role is to assist the student in planning a suitable academic program. However, the student is responsible for following all applicable academic regulations. This includes general education requirements, prerequisites, and major/minor requirements. Students are individually responsible for all course registrations and for completing the requirements for graduation. The Office of the Registrar will drop students who register for courses without following departmental or University regulations. Each student must register online prior to the first day of class. After classes begin, each student must register in person in the Office of the Registrar.

The University has a two‑phase registration system: the early or pre‑registration phase and the regular registration phase.

Students currently enrolled at The University of North Carolina at Pembroke may complete their registration by: (1) consulting with their advisor during the designated early registration period, (2) obtaining the personal identification number (PIN) from the advisor and preparing their class schedule for the next semester, (3) registering for the approved course work online, and (4) paying tuition and fees to the Cashier's Office.

Students returning after an absence of one semester may complete their registration by: (1) consulting with their advisor during the designated registration period, (2) obtaining a PIN and preparing their class schedule for the semester, (3) registering for the approved course work online, and (4) paying tuition and fees at the Cashier's Office.

Students who have not returned to the University in two semesters (one academic year), need to apply for readmission to the University. Please see Re‑Enrolling Students in the Undergraduate Admissions section of the Catalog. Students who are in good academic standing with the University maintain an active enrollment status for two semesters (one academic year).

Adding, Dropping, and Withdrawing from Courses

After a student has completed registration the only way the student's schedule can be changed is through the drop‑add procedure. To add a course a student must obtain a Course Add Form from an academic department, complete the form, have it approved by his or her advisor, obtain the signature of the gaining professor, and present the form to the Office of the Registrar. To drop a course a student must obtain a Course Withdrawal Form from an academic department, complete the form, have it approved by his or her advisor, and present the form to the Office of the Registrar.

A student may withdraw from a course after the drop‑add period but prior to and including the last day of the first week of classes after midterm grades are reported, with a grade of W, if the student obtains the signature of her or his advisor and instructor. Students entering UNCP as freshmen will have the option of withdrawing from a maximum of 15 semester hours of coursework.

A student who transfers to UNCP may not withdraw from more than the maximum number of hours of coursework as determined by the table below during his/her undergraduate career at UNCP. After a student has withdrawn from the maximum allowed number of credit hours, any subsequent withdrawal will result automatically in a grade of "F." These limits apply only to the Fall and Spring semester courses, not to Summer session courses.

Transfer Hours Maximum Withdrawal Hours
0‑23 hours 15
24‑51 hours 12
52‑89 hours 9
90 or more hours 6
Candidate for Second Bachelor's degree 6

 The Associate Vice Chancellor for Enrollment may approve withdrawal from a course or courses at any time without academic penalty if serious extenuating circumstances, such as serious illness, exist. Unsatisfactory academic performance does not by itself constitute an extenuating circumstance. As soon as possible, the student petitioning to withdraw from a course due to extenuating circumstances must meet with the Associate Vice Chancellor for Enrollment, present the appropriate medical or legal documentation, and complete the necessary forms. Withdrawal under these circumstances will not count toward a student's 15-hour career withdrawal limit.  Approved requests receive a grade of WX. In addition, the following conditions apply:

  1. a WX will be recorded on the transcript;
  2. the course(s) will count as attempted hours;
  3. the course(s) will not count in tuition surcharge calculations;
  4. the course(s) will not count in GPA calculation;
  5. the course(s) are subject to all Financial Aid and SAP rules and calculations.

Students denied a request for the grade of WX may appeal to the Provost or designee whose decision will be final.

Withdrawal from the University

Up to the last day to receive a W in a course, a student may complete a "Request for Withdraw‑ al" form, available from the Office of the Registrar webpage at www.uncp.edu/registrar. The student should get the required signatures, take the I.D. card to the Student Accounts Office, and return the form to the Office of the Registrar. The University makes applicable refunds only after the withdrawal procedure is completed.

After the last day to receive a W in a course, or if the student wishes to withdraw on time with grades of WX, the Associate Vice Chancellor for Enrollment approves withdrawal from the University without academic penalty only when unusual and documentable circumstances warrant. Unsatisfactory academic performance does not by itself meet the requirement. As soon as possible, the student petitioning to withdraw from the University must meet with the Associate Vice Chancellor for Enrollment, present the appropriate medical or legal documentation, and complete the necessary forms. Withdrawal under these circumstances will not count toward a student's 15 hour career withdrawal limit. In addition, the following conditions apply:

  1. a WX will be recorded on the transcript;
  2. the course(s) will count as attempted hours;
  3. the course(s) will not count in tuition surcharge calculations;
  4. the course(s) will not count in GPA calculation;
  5. the course(s) are subject to all Financial Aid and SAP rules and calculations.

Students denied a request for the grade of WX may appeal to the Provost or designee whose decision will be final.

Students who stop attending classes without completing the withdrawal procedure ordinarily receive an F in courses for which they are registered.

Repetition of Course Work

A student who wishes to repeat a course must adhere to the following policies:

  1. The original course and the repeat course must be taken at UNCP.
  2. The course being repeated must be the same course taken previously; no substitutions are allowed.
  3. Students may repeat a course twice. Exceptions to this limit require approval of the chair of the department offering the course and the appropriate dean.
  4. All grades received in courses repeated will be used to compute the quality point average, unless the student elects to use a grade replacement (see "Grade Replacement Policy" below).
  5. A student will receive credit (earned hours) for a course one time, and the most recent grade will be used in meeting graduation requirements.
  6. All entries remain a part of the student's permanent record.

Grade Replacement Policy

a. Students Entering UNCP Prior to Fall 1994

Undergraduate students who entered UNCP before the fall of 1994 and who follow the repeat policy will automatically have the grade replaced for all eligible repeats. The semester hours and quality points in courses repeated are counted only once, and the most recent grade and the quality points corresponding to the most recent grade are used in computing the quality point average and meeting graduation requirements. However, all entries remain a part of the student's permanent record.

b. Students Entering UNCP for Fall 1994 and Thereafter

Beginning with the fall semester of 1994, undergraduate students who enter UNCP and who wish to replace a course grade must adhere to/the following policies:

  1. A student must follow all regulations regarding repetition of course work.
  2. Some courses may be taken more than once for full credit; these courses are not eligible for grade replacement.
  3. The semester hours and quality points in courses repeated are counted only once, and the most recent grade and the quality points corresponding to the most recent grade are used in computing the quality point average and meeting graduation requirements.
  4. Students entering UNCP as freshmen from Fall 1994 through Spring 2013 will have the option of replacing a maximum of 15 credit hours with improved grades earned by repeating courses. Students entering UNCP as freshmen beginning in Fall 2013 will have the option of replacing a maximum of 12 credit hours with improved grades earned by repeating courses. No student is eligible for more than 15 hours of replacement credit regardless of his/her entry date.
  5. The credit hours associated with each repeated course will count toward the cumulative replacement hours.
  6. Students transferring or readmitted to UNCP may replace grades for courses taken at UNCP for a maximum number of hours as determined by the scale below, which is based on the number of hours accepted for transfer or readmission.
Transfer or Readmission Hours Accepted as of Fall 1994 Maximum Hours for Replacement
0‑23 hours 15 or 12 (based on entry date)
24‑51 hours 12
52‑89 hours 9
90 or more hours 6
Candidate for Second Bachelor's degree 6

 

  1. The student must secure a form from the Registrar's Office and indicate in writing which course grades are to be replaced for computation of the quality point average. The form designating specific course grade replacements will be maintained on permanent file in the Registrar's Office.
  2. Decisions for course grade replacement are irrevocable.
  3. All entries remain a part of the student's permanent record.

Internships, Practica, And Independent Learning

Internships, practica, and other external learning experiences provide opportunities for students to earn academic credit for approved work or research programs in cooperating business‑government, or education organizations. The internships, which are of one‑term duration, are open to qualified junior or senior students with the approval of the department chairman.

All internships, practica, and other external learning experiences are supervised by UNC Pembroke faculty, who also assign grades in the courses.

Experiential Learning and Cooperative Education

Practical work experience is very important in today's world. Students at UNC Pembroke may elect to get some practical work experience which is related to their program major (or minor) through several practical work experiences.

a. Experiential Learning Program: Experiential Learning is a working‑and‑learning arrangement. The student negotiates a proposal in some area of interest to the student. Negotiation involves the student, the University, and an organization (business, agency, etc.) where the student plans to work. Experiential Learning is available through academic departments and requires approval of the chairman.

The following regulations govern the offerings of Experiential Learning:

  1. The Experiential Learning Program consists largely of Experiential Learning I and Experiential Learning II. A student must take the courses in numerical order. They cannot be taken concurrently.
  2. The amount of credit that can be earned in Experiential Learning I and II varies from one to three semester hours in each course, and is jointly determined by the student and the student's major advisor on the basis of what the student contracts to do.
  3. To be eligible for enrollment in Experiential Learning I or II, a student must:
    1. have declared for a major program in a department which provides its students with practical work experience through Experiential Learning I and II;
    2. be classified as a junior or senior;
    3. have an overall cumulative quality point average of at least 2.0;
    4. have the written recommendation and approval of the major department chairman and the major advisor.
  4. Each eligible student who registers for Experiential Learning I or II is required to sign and carry out a written work‑learning contract jointly developed by the student, the student's advisor, and the organization providing the practical work experience which states:
    1. what the student is to do, what the major advisor is to do, and what the organization is to do;
    2. the number of semester hours the students will earn in completing the contract;
    3. that credit will be earned only if all of the contracted work is completed with a contract period of one‑semester or term of summer session;
  5. Eligible students are allowed to use not more than a total of six semester hours credit in Experiential Learning I and II in meeting the 128 semester hours minimum requirement for the degree.

b. Cooperative Education Program: Cooperative Education is an arrangement whereby UNC Pembroke cooperates with an outside business or agency to help a student directly explore a career‑related field as an integral part of the educational program. The program allows participating students to alternate full‑time work and on‑campus study as complementary educational experiences while pursuing an academic degree program. To be eligible, a student must have completed a minimum of 30 semester hours and normally must have earned a cumulative QPA of 2.0 or above. Participants typically receive pay, and academic credit may be awarded if approved by the department chair, the Academic Affairs office, and the Registrar. Cooperative Education is coordinated by the Career Center.

Independent Study

A student who wishes to enroll in an Independent Study Course in any department must: (1) meet the requirements established by the department for Independent Study and (2) submit a written Request for Independent Study to the department chair. The Request for Independent Study must include a complete description of the Independent Study Project and a schedule for submission of the Project. The Request must be approved by (1) the professor supervising the Independent Study Project and (2) the department chair. A student may elect to work for one, two, or three semester hours of credit.

Upon completion of the Independent Study Project, the student must submit the Project to the supervising professor. The supervising professor will evaluate the Project and assign a grade. A copy of the Project will be submitted to the department chair, who will keep it on file.

Departments permitting Independent Study Projects will have written guidelines setting out the requirements for Independent Study. Supervision of Independent Study Projects by faculty is voluntary.

Class Attendance Policies

Students are expected to attend class, be prepared for engaged learning, and be aware of the policies outlined in every course syllabus. Professors and instructors should communicate clear expectations regarding attendance, participation, and make-up of any missed exams and assignments. These expectations should be included in the written course syllabus and explained during the first day of each semester.  Faculty teaching an online course should require completion of an assignment of the faculty member's choosing  that requires active student participation within the roster verification period.

Professors and instructors teaching general education courses will keep accurate attendance records and notify the Academic Support Center when a student's attendance patterns become counterproductive to academic progress. Excessive absences may result in course failure, and any student who does not attend any class can be administratively withdrawn by the university. Faculty and staff are encouraged to offer reasonable accommodations to students with documented illnesses, family or medical emergencies, bereavement, or official legal proceedings.

If a student is representing the university in an official capacity (e.g., academic conference, student government, course field trips, service-learning activities, ROTC events, athletics, band), it is recommended that the faculty member in charge of the course excuse the absence, for up to 15% of class sessions and, when it is feasible, allow the student to make up the missed work.  However, the final decision on whether to excuse an absence rests with the faculty member.

It remains the responsibility of the student to communicate accurately and regularly with the professor or instructor about missed classes due to any reason, including for university-sanctioned events. During the first week of each semester, students shall provide official documentation of proposed university-sanctioned events that will result in excused absences, unless such notice is impracticable (e.g., rescheduled events).  Prior written documentation shall be provided for each excused absence unless extenuating circumstances arise. 

When the University is officially closed, no student can be counted absent, even if the instructor holds class. Any course‑related material will be made available in some form by the instructor.

Notice Concerning The Inspection and Release Of Student Records

The University of North Carolina at Pembroke complies with all provisions of the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974. The full statement of the University's policy is available in the Office of the Registrar located in Lumbee Hall. With some exceptions, students have the right to inspect and to challenge the contents of their education records. Access to academic records is coordinated through the Registrar's Office. Students wishing to inspect their records should contact the Registrar in Lumbee Hall between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. Monday ‑ Friday, while the University is in session.

The University routinely releases to the public so‑called Directory Information, as follows: the student's name, address, telephone listing, electronic mail address, major field of study, participation in officially recognized activities and sports, weight and height of athletic teams, dates of attendance, degrees and awards received, and previous educational agency or institution attended by the student. Any student who wishes to have the above Directory Information withheld must complete and sign a request in the Registrar's Office. The consent for non‑disclosure will remain on the student's record until the student signs consent to lift the confidential status hold.

Federal Family Educational Rights And Privacy Act (FERPA):

Certain personally identifiable information about students ("education records") may be maintained at The University of North Carolina General Administration, which serves the Board of Governors of the University system. This student information may be the same as, or derivative of, information maintained by a constituent institution of the University; or it may be additional information. Whatever their origins, education records maintained at General Administration are subject to the Federal Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 (FERPA).

FERPA provides that a student may inspect his or her education records. If the student finds the records to be inaccurate, misleading, or otherwise in violation of the student's privacy rights, the student may request amendment to the record. FERPA also provides that a student's personally identifiable information may not be released to someone else unless (1) the student has given a proper consent for disclosure or (2) provisions of FERPA or federal regulations issued pursuant to FERPA permit the information to be released without the student's consent.

A student may file with the U.S. Department of Education a complaint concerning failure of General Administration or an institution to comply with FERPA.

The policies of The University of North Carolina General Administration concerning FERPA may be inspected in the office at each constituent institution designated to maintain the FERPA policies of the institution. Policies of General Administration may also be accessed in the Office of the Secretary of The University of North Carolina, General Administration, 910 Raleigh Road, Chapel Hill, NC.

Further details about FERPA and FERPA procedures at General Administration are to be found in the referenced policies. Questions about the policies may be directed to Legal Section, Office of the President, The University of North Carolina, General Administration, Annex Building, 910 Raleigh Road, Chapel Hill, NC (mailing address P.O. Box 2688, Chapel Hill, NC 27515‑2688; tel: 919‑962‑ 4588). Edition 5/97

The University Of North Carolina At Pembroke Academic Honor Code

By accepting admission to The University of North Carolina at Pembroke, each student also accepts the standards of conduct, both in the classroom and outside it, of the UNCP community. One of the most important of these standards is academic honesty. Students are expected to know what the Academic Honor Code says and to apply the provisions of that Code to their conduct at the University.

This catalog reflects the UNCP Academic Honor Code in effect on the date the catalog was published.   It is possible that changes to the policy may be made during the 2016-17 academic year.  Use the following link for the most current version of the UNCP Academic Honor Code:

http://www.uncp.edu/about-uncp/administration/policies-and-regulations/all-policies/pol-020505-academic-honor-code-policy

1. STATEMENT OF PRINCIPLES

1.1 Academic honor and integrity are essential to the existence of a university community. If high standards of honesty are not maintained by everyone, the entire community and society itself suffer. Maintaining standards of academic honesty and integrity is ultimately the formal responsibility of the instructional faculty. Therefore, when any academic dishonesty is suspected, a faculty member has the responsibility to, and must, follow the policies and procedures of the UNCP Academic Honor Code.

1.2 Students are important members of the academic community. As responsible citizens of the UNCP community, students are obligated to uphold basic standards of honesty and to actively encourage others to respect and maintain those standards. Allowing academic dishonesty is just as dishonest as committing a dishonest act oneself.

1.3 The Academic Honor Code applies to both undergraduate and graduate students who attend the University of North Carolina at Pembroke.

2. ACTS THAT VIOLATE THE ACADEMIC HONOR CODE

2.1 While specific violations may take many forms, the general categories of acts that violate the Academic Honor Code are as follows:

2.1.a. Cheating. Cheating means the use of or attempted use of unauthorized materials and methods (notes, books, electronic information, submission of work composed by another entity, telephonic or other forms of communication, or other sources or methods) in any academic exercise, whether graded or otherwise. This definition includes both giving unauthorized information (in either oral or written form) and receiving such information during any academic exercise, whether graded or otherwise.

2.1.b. Plagiarism. Plagiarism is defined as the representation of another's words, thoughts, creative works, images or ideas as one's own without proper attribution in connection with submission of academic work, whether graded or otherwise.

2.1.c. Fabrication and falsification. Fabrication and falsification is defined as the alteration, invention or citation of any information or material in any academic exercise, whether graded or otherwise. Falsification is a matter of altering information or material, while fabrication is a matter of inventing or counterfeiting information or material for use in any academic exercise, whether graded or otherwise.

2.1.d. Abuse of Academic Materials. Abuse of Academic Materials is defined as the destruction, defacement, stealing, altering, or making inaccessible library or other academic material.

2.1.e. Complicity in Academic Dishonesty.  Complicity means knowingly helping or attempting to help another person to commit any act of academic dishonesty. For example, complicity would include allowing another student to look at test answers or to copy a paper. Simply stated, don't help someone else be dishonest. 

3. PENALTIES FOR VIOLATIONS OF THE ACADEMIC HONOR CODE

3.1 The UNCP community takes the Academic Honor Code very seriously. Consequently, violations may lead to severe penalties. All acts of academic dishonesty violate standards essential to the existence of an academic community. Some first offenses are properly handled and penalties determined by the faculty member teaching the specific course in which they occur. The faculty member must use the settlement procedure described below to handle such an offense.

3.2 Penalties which individual faculty members may impose are limited to the following:

3.2.a. a formal written warning or reprimand;

3.2.b. a reduced grade (including F) for the assignment;

3.2.c. a reduced grade (including F) for the entire course; and

3.2.d. supplemental educational assignment(s) in conjunction with the penalties above.

3.2.1 In all cases, whatever the penalty, a signed Settlement of a Violation of the Academic Honor Code form will be kept for ten years in the Office of Student Conduct. When submitting the form to the Office of Student Conduct, all information on the form must be completed in its entirety as well as signed by both the faculty member and the student.  The purpose of this record-keeping is to deter students from repeating offenses and to maintain continuity of recordkeeping regarding academic misconduct. A second purpose is to be sure students who violate the Academic Honor Code a second time are appropriately adjudicated.

3.3 The Conduct Hearing Board (CHB) handles all second offenses, some more serious first offenses, and any charges that the student feels are unfounded. In addition to any of the penalties available to an individual faculty member, the CHB may implement educational sanctions (i.e. educational courses on academic integrity, referral to academic support services, referral to counseling, etc.) suspend the student from the university for a designated period of time, (one semester, one year, etc.) or dismiss the student from the university.

3.4 Several factors are considered in determining what penalty to impose for a violation of the Academic Honor Code. Those factors include:

3.4.a. the nature and seriousness of the offense;

3.4.b. the injury or damage resulting from the violation;

3.4.c. the student's prior disciplinary record; and

3.4.d. the student's attitude and behavior after the violation was committed.

4. PROCEDURES FOR HANDLING CHARGES OF VIOLATIONS

4.1 If the faculty member responsible for a course obtains evidence, either directly or through information supplied by others, that a student may have violated the Academic Honor Code, the faculty member has a duty to investigate and document the incident by collecting whatever relevant information is available.

4.2 If the faculty member decides that the information is sufficient to support a charge against the student, the faculty member is to contact the director of student conduct, who will determine from the records of past violations whether the student in question has previously admitted to, or been found responsible in a previous case of, an Academic Honor Code violation.

4.3 If the suspected violation would be a second offense, the faculty member must take the case to the CHB. If the charge would be a first offense and the faculty member believes that a penalty no greater than F in the course would be appropriate, the charge may be settled between the faculty member and the student (as described below), with the settlement form signed and filed with the Office of Student Conduct . If the suspected violation would be a first offense, but one for which the faculty member considers the appropriate penalty to be more severe than F in the course, the case must be brought to the Office of Student Conduct for referral to the CHB.

4.4 Once a student has received notice that he or she is alleged to have violated the Academic Honor Code and has been notified of the allegation, he or she may not withdraw from the course or the university in order to avoid the penalty.

5. SETTLEMENT PROCEDURE TO BE USED BY INDIVIDUAL FACULTY MEMBERS

5.1 The faculty member should meet via phone, email, video conferencing, or in person with the student suspected of violating the Academic Honor Code, present the evidence of the violation, and request an explanation from the student. After hearing the explanation, if the faculty member decides that a violation has occurred, he or she fills out and signs the Settlement of a Violation of the Academic Honor Code form, which is available to all faculty members online or in hard copy through the Office of Student Conduct. The faculty member indicates the nature of the violation and the penalty to be applied, and then gives a copy of the form to the student. After receiving the form, the student has three (3) calendar days to consider and seek advice on whether to admit responsibility and accept the penalty by signing the form.

5.2 If the student agrees to sign, admitting responsibility and accepts the penalty proposed, he or she does so in the presence of the faculty member or email communication with the faculty member. The faculty member then imposes the penalty. The faculty member will then make two (2) copies of the signed form. The faculty member will provide one copy to the student and keep one copy for their files. The faculty member will send the original signed settlement form to the director of student conduct, who keeps a record of first offenses for ten years, and thus the matter is ended. If the student decides not to admit responsibility or not to accept the penalty, the faculty member must take the case to the Office of Student Conduct for the incident to be referred to the CHB, if any penalty is to be imposed.

6. CONDUCT HEARING BOARD

6.1 Composition of the CHB is as follows:

6.1.a. a minimum of five (5) students recommended by the president of the student body, and/or interested students may be recommended by university departments, or interested students may apply to the Office of Student Conduct for selection for consideration by the chancellor. Students that are recommended and/or selected will be appointed by the chancellor;

6.1.b. a minimum of five (5) faculty members recommended by the faculty senate chairperson and appointed by the chancellor;

6.1.c. a minimum of five (5) administrative members recommended by the vice chancellor for student affairs and appointed by the chancellor.

6.2. Hearings follow procedures outlined in the UNCP Student Handbook, Chapter IV., Rights and Responsibilities. The CHB will judge the student as responsible or not responsible of the charges contained in the form submitted by the faculty member. The faculty member who has submitted the violation will provide information to the CHB to support his/her position. The student who has been charged with a violation may provide information to the CHB to support his/her position. Members of the CHB may question either the student or the faculty member or both and may ask for additional materials as they see fit to do so. In a closed session, the CHB will come to a conclusion about the validity of the charges.

6.3 If the student charged with a violation of the Academic Honor Code is found not responsible, the CHB prepares a written report of the case and sends it to the director of student conduct, who will maintain a confidential file of materials related to the case. No part of the file becomes part of the student's disciplinary record. The case is closed and no penalty may be imposed.

6.4 If a student is found responsible of violating the Academic Honor Code, the CHB  will determine an appropriate penalty. Both the student and faculty member who submitted the violation may give evidence and make statements concerning the appropriate penalties to be imposed. The director of student conduct will supply the student's previous academic honor code disciplinary record (if any) to the CHB.

6.5 After hearing the evidence on the appropriate penalty, the CHB  will determine the penalty, and prepare a written report to the student and the director of student conduct. The director of student conduct notifies the faculty member and the provost and vice chancellor for academic affairs of the contents of that report. If the CHB  decides that a penalty of a grade of F in the course (or one less severe) is appropriate, the faculty member imposes that penalty and no other penalty. If a more severe penalty is deemed appropriate, the director of student conduct implements the penalty indicated in the report. The student will be notified by the director of student conduct within five (5) days of the CHB's determination of penalty.

7. CONDUCT APPEAL BOARD

7.1 If the CHB has found a student responsible of violating the Academic Honor Code, the student has the right to appeal that decision. If the student does not file a notice of appeal, the decision of the CHB will be final.

7.2 In order for a student to appeal a determination of the CHB in an Academic Honor Code violation, the student must contact the Office of Student Conduct to complete the "Request for Appellate Consideration" form. A student must submit the "Request for Appellate Consideration" form within five (5) calendar days to the director of student conduct. The director of student conduct will deliver the request as well as all related materials to the Conduct Appeal Board.

7.3 The composition of the Conduct Appeal Board and its powers are in Chapter IV., Rights and Responsibilities. For Academic Honor Code violations and their appeals, the provost and vice chancellor for academic affairs (or his or her designee) will represent the vice chancellor for student affairs.

7.3.1 All charges for alleged Academic Honor Code violations occurring one week prior to exams and going through exam week and during summer sessions will be heard by the administrative hearing officer. Appeals will be directed solely to the provost and vice chancellor for academic affairs or his or her designee.

8. WHAT TO EXPECT FROM FACULTY

8.1 Faculty members have been instructed that they should outline their expectations pertaining to the Academic Honor Code at the beginning of each course. Students should be aware that some faculty members authorize or prohibit specific forms of student conduct which are unique to their courses or disciplines. All faculty members should refer students to the Academic Honor Code which is published in the UNCP Student Handbook. Further, faculty members have been advised to include the following statement in all course syllabi:

8.1.a Student Academic Honor Code. Students have the responsibility to know and observe the UNCP Academic Honor Code. This code forbids cheating, plagiarism, abuse of academic materials, fabrication or falsification of information, and complicity in academic dishonesty. Any special requirements or permission regarding academic honesty in this course will be provided to students in writing at the beginning of the course, and are binding on the students. Academic evaluations in this course include a judgment that the student's work is free from academic dishonesty of any type; and grades in this course therefore should be and will be adversely affected by academic dishonesty. Students who violate the code can be dismissed from the university. The normal penalty for a first offense is an F in the course. Standards of academic honor will be enforced in this course. Students are expected to report cases of academic dishonesty to the instructor.

8.2 In general, faculty members should, and will, take preventive measures to avoid cases of academic dishonesty (for example, examinations should be carefully proctored). However, a faculty member's failure to take such measures is no excuse for academic dishonesty. Academic honesty and integrity, in the final analysis, are matters of personal honesty and individual integrity on the part of every student.