Nov 29, 2021  
The University of North Carolina at Pembroke 2017-2018 Catalog 
    
The University of North Carolina at Pembroke 2017-2018 Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Geology

  
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    GLY 4150. Geology Field Trip (1-3 credits)


    Field trip to selected geologic sites to increase appreciation and understanding of geologic, biologic, and cultural resources in areas outside of the UNCP community. A fee is charged to cover travel expenses. Course may be taken for credit up to 3 times. PREREQ: GLY 1150 .

  
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    GLY 4250. Stratigraphy and Sedimentology (3 credits)


    Study of environments of deposition of sediments and stratigraphic principles including facies and correlation. Classic examples from the geologic record will be used. PREREQ: GLY 1250 .

  
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    GLY 4700. Writing in the Geosciences (3 credits)


    Crosslisted: (GGY 4700)
    Development of skill in fundamental communication in the geosciences. Students study methods of communication and research as well as practice presentations. Writing will be addressed as a process involving drafts, revisions, and peer review.

  
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    GLY 5010. Essentials of Earth Science (3 credits)


    Advanced study of topics in geology, meteorology, oceanography, and solar system astronomy.

  
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    GLY 5020. Essentials of Earth History (3 credits)


    An Advanced study of earth history as recorded in the rock record. Topics include geologic time; evolution of the continents, oceans and atmosphere; fossils and the development of life through time; and the historical development of geologic concepts. PREREQ: GLY 5010  or permission of the instructor.

  
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    GLY 5030. Geology of North Carolina (3 credits)


    Study of the geology of North Carolina. Areas include the Blue Ridge, Piedmont, Newark-type Basins, and Coastal Plain. Topics include rocks, structures, environmental geology, economic geology, and plate tectonic implications of these regions. May include field trips.

  
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    GLY 5410. Meteorology and Climatology (3 credits)


    Analysis and presentation of weather and climate information. Emphasis on explanatory methods in basic meteorology. Graphical representation and modeling of weather elements, atmospheric processes and climate regions.


Geology Laboratory

  
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    GLYL 1000. Physical Geology Laboratory (1 credit)


    Study of common minerals and rocks; use of topographic and geologic maps. PREREQ: Current enrollment in or completion of GLY 1000 .

  
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    GLYL 1150. Earth Science Laboratory (1 credit)


    Crosslisted: (GGYL 1150)
    Study of common minerals and rocks, topographic maps, climate classification, weather processes. PREREQ: Current enrollment in or completion of GLY 1150 .

  
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    GLYL 1250. Earth History Laboratory (1 credit)


    Study of animal and plant fossils, environments of deposition, geologic maps. PREREQ: Current enrollment in or completion of GLY 1250 .


Special Topics in Geology

  
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    GLYS 2xxx. General Topics in Geology (1-4 credits)


    This course will focus on a topic of general interest and explore its breadth. The topic will be announced in the schedule of classes. Possible topics include general methodological and topical concepts.

  
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    GLYS 4xxx. Special Topics in Geology (1-4 credits)


    This course will focus on a topic of general interest and explore it in depth. The topic will be announced in the schedule of classes. Possible topics include dinosaurs, natural disasters, etc. The course may be repeated for a maximum of 6 semester hours.

  
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    GLYS 5xxx. Special Topics in Geology (1-4 credits)


    Course content will change from offering to offering. It will meet the special needs of individuals within the master's program at UNCP and of students who seek credit by enrolling in special departmental offerings such as short courses, seminars, and special intense summer experiences that focus on concepts within the discipline of geology. Offerings will be on an announced basis.


Health Administration

  
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    HAD 5620. Professional Paper (3 credits)


    Crosslisted: (PAD 5620, CRJ 5620, EMG 5620)
    A directed, supervised activity in which the student develops and analyzes a suitable topic, issue, or problem in leadership or management. The research subject must be one which can be addressed through the application of the knowledge and the research skill gained from course work (see Overview).

  
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    HAD 5710. Health Administration and Organization (3 credits)


    A focus on how health care is delivered and the challenges facing health care administrators from the internal and external environment.

  
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    HAD 5720. Health Policy (3 credits)


    The focus is on trends in health care delivery with emphasis on health care cost containment, access to health care, and recent efforts to invoke broad based systemic reforms to the U.S. Health Care System.

  
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    HAD 5730. Legal and Ethical Issues in Health Care (3 credits)


    The focus is on the health delivery entity as a corporation, its relationship with physicians and other health deliverers and patients, and professional liability.

  
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    HAD 5740. Health Economics (3 credits)


    The application of health care to economic theory, private and government insurance, cost containment theories and analysis.

  
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    HAD 5750. Comparative Health Care Systems (3 credits)


    In an increasingly globalized society, a clear understanding of international health care systems is a fundamental step toward improving the quality of health care systems, both in the United States and abroad. This course will examine 17 countries using a health care rubric of workforce, technology, cost, quality, and access. PREREQ: full admission status in the MPA program


Health Promotion

  
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    HLTH 1060. Safety and First Aid (1 credit)


    A certified-based American Red Cross study of safety, first aid, CPR, and emergency procedures. Eight-week course.

  
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    HLTH 2000. Principles of Health and Fitness Promotion (3 credits)


    A generic introduction for students pursuing professional preparation in health promotion. It will discuss the historical and philosophical perspectives of the development of health promotion and examine the delivery of health promotion in a variety of settings.

  
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    HLTH 2060. Nutrition (1 credit)


    Crosslisted: (PED 2060)
    Designed to investigate topics in nutrition which are most relevant to physical activity, fitness, health, and sports participation. Along with general nutrition information, topics will include the effects foods have on physical performance, eating disorders, and proper body fat control. Half-semester course.

  
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    HLTH 2100. Applied Nutrition (3)


    This course will provide an overview of basic nutrition (micronutrients and macronutrients) as well as applied work relevant to metabolic disorders, specialty diets for different comorbidities, performance nutrition, and dispelling diet myths. PREREQ: EXPH 2100

  
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    HLTH 3060. Human Sexuality (3 credits)


    This course will provide the student with an examination of the physiological, psychological and sociological factors of human sexuality. Topics include social and biological foundations of human sexuality, human reproduction and contraception, cross-cultural perspectives on sexual behavior and society, gender roles, sexual stereotyping, issues in sex education, and the effects of various climates (economics, policy, politics, etc) on the expression of human sexuality.

  
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    HLTH 3070. Women's Health Issues (3 credits)


    Course will provide the student with an examination of the various health issues that are specific to women. Topics will include, but are not limited to, the menstrual cycle, reproductive health and menopause, osteopenia and osteoporosis, the female athlete triad, female-specific illnesses including cancers, etc.

  
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    HLTH 3080. Ethnic and Cultural Implications in Health Promotion (3 credits)


    This course will provide in-depth study of the importance of cultural competence and cultural sensitivity in the practice of health promotion and education. Students in this course will develop a better understanding of those cultural behaviors, often considered by Westerners as exotic, that will need to be embraced when employing health promotion programming.

  
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    HLTH 3300. Health Promotion and Fitness Skills (3 credits)


    This course will acquaint students with various learning theories and teaching methods. The focus will be upon selecting methods, media and techniques best suited for teaching health promotion and fitness content to specific learners.

  
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    HLTH 3650. Epidemiology of Human Diseases (3 credits)


    Study of the disease process including causes, effects, and control of selected diseases with emphasis on disease prevention and health promotion. PREREQ: HLTH 3060, 3070, and 3080

  
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    HLTH 3660. Health Advocacy (3)


    Health advocacy is a cornerstone of the health education profession. This course will provide students with a concentrated study of the techniques and reasons for advocating for changes in health policy, practice, and legislation. PREREQ: HLTH 3060, 3070, and 3080

  
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    HLTH 3670. Health Care Ethics (3)


    This course will provide students with a concentrated study of the basic ethical principles and precedents in health care, with heavy emphasis on case study. Health care ethics are a foundational unit of health education, public health, and health administration. PREREQ: HLTH 3060, 3070, and 3080

  
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    HLTH 3770. Drugs, Society, and Behavior (3 credits)


    A study of the types and functions of pharmaceutical treatments. Drug addiction is analyzed as a social, psychological, and biological process. PREREQ: SOC 1020  or permission of instructor.

  
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    HLTH 4100. Health and Fitness Behavior Changes (3 credits)


    This course provides students with the foundations necessary to develop a theoretical basis for the analysis and interpretation of specific health and fitness behaviors. This foundation will assist them in planning, implementing and evaluating behavioral change program for individuals or groups. PREREQ: 90 credit hours passed and a 2.0 GPA

  
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    HLTH 4250. Leisure and Wellness for Older Adults (3 credits)


    Crosslisted: (REC 4250)
    The study of the physical, social, and emotional characteristics, needs, and interests of middle and older adults related to fitness and leisure activities utilizing a theoretical and practical approach.

  
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    HLTH 4700. Planning, Administration, and Evaluation of Programs (3 credits)


    This course will provide an in‑depth examination of program‑planning and evaluation in areas of health, fitness, leisure activity, etc. Emphasis will be placed on the overall planning processes for developing a variety of wellness settings. PREREQ: 90 credit hours passed and a 2.0 GPA

  
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    HLTH 4910. Three-Credit Internship (3 credits)


    A practical work experience in a health promotion setting, e.g., hospital, public health agency or industry supervised by an on‑site supervisor and a UNCP faculty member. Majors must have at least a 2.0 QPA within the major to be eligible for the internship.


Honors Seminars

  
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    HON 1000. Contemporary Public Issues (3 credits)


    Restrictions: Honors College students only Analysis of selected contemporary events from the points of view of history, political science, psychology, geography, economics, philosophy, religion, and sociology, in the light of weekly world developments. Emphasis upon the appreciation and development of logic and style in critical thought in considering international and domestic conflicts, human rights and institutional effectiveness, freedom and responsibility, and resources, technology, and the environment. Honors students receive General Education credit for a course in the Social Sciences Division. PREREQ: Honors College students only

  
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    HON 1510. Contemporary Issues in Science and Technology (3 credits)


    Restrictions: Honors College students only An interdisciplinary examination of scientific and technological issues of current global significance. The scientific principles relating to each topic will be examined, followed by analysis of management possibilities and problems, technological applications, and implications for society. Where appropriate, laboratory experiences (both on and off campus) will be involved which expose the student to relevant techniques and methodology. Honors students receive General Education credit for a course in the Physical Science area of the Natural Sciences and Mathematics Division. PREREQ: Honors College students only

  
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    HON 2000. The Humanistic Tradition I: From the Ancient World to 1500 (3 credits)


    Restrictions: Honors College students only An interdisciplinary seminar in humanities that surveys, within historical and cultural contexts, a selection of works of art, architecture, literature, music, and philosophy, Honors 2000 focuses on significant cultural legacies from the beginnings of human cultures to 1500. Honors students receive General Education credit for a course in the Divisional Electives area of Humanities. PREREQ: Honors College students only

  
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    HON 2010. The Humanistic Tradition II: From 1500 to the Contemporary Age (3 credits)


    Restrictions: Honors College students only An interdisciplinary seminar in humanities that surveys, within historical and cultural contexts, a selection of works of art, architecture, literature, music, film, and philosophy, Honors 2010 focuses on significant cultural legacies from the last 500 years. Honors students receive General Education credit for a course in the Divisional Electives area of Humanities. PREREQ: Honors College students only

  
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    HON 2520. Mathematical Concepts and Applications (3 credits)


    Restrictions: Honors College students only Current approaches to mathematical concepts and applications will be examined. The course will introduce selected topics in mathematics in a seminar format. Honors students receive General Education credit for a course in the Divisional Electives area of Natural Sciences and Mathematics. PREREQ: Honors College students only

  
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    HON 2750. The Individual in Society (3 credits)


    Restrictions: Honors College students only The study of human behavior from the perspective of psychology, sociology, or a related field. The course will introduce selected topics in the social sciences in a seminar format. Honors students receive General Education credit for a course in the Social Sciences Division. PREREQ: Honors College students only

  
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    HON 3000. Cultures in Contact (3 credits)


    Restrictions: Honors College students only This course is designed to introduce students to a specific world culture through a variety of methods. The readings will include sociological, economic, historical, and fictional accounts of this country. The objective is to learn about another culture while also learning how to approach the study of and engagement with that culture. There will also be a travel component to provide for first-hand engagement with the culture studied. PREREQ: Honors College students only

  
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    HON 4000. Research Methods and Prospectus (1 credit)


    Restrictions: Honors College students only Preparation of a prospectus for the thesis or project, in consultation with an advisor. Group discussion on the methodology, standards, and experience of research and criticism. Pass/Fail grading. PREREQ: Honors College students only

  
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    HON 4500. Honors Thesis/Project (3 credits)


    Restrictions: Honors College students only Preparation of a thesis or project in consultation with a faculty committee chosen by the student; presentation of the work in seminar. Independent study in the student's major is encouraged. PREREQ: Honors College students only

  
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    HON 4990. Honors Independent Study (1-3 credits)


    Restrictions: Honors College students only Open to Honors College students to pursue supervised independent innovative learning. Independent study may include laboratory research, study abroad, or mentored independent projects. May be repeated for a total of 6 hours in no more than two semesters. PREREQ: Honors College students only. Requires written permission of the proposed mentor and the Honors College Dean.


Health and Human Performance

  
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    EXER 5010. Health, Fitness, and Exercise Physiology (3 credits)


    Course will present concepts of health, fitness, and exercise physiology in a practical approach based on researched principles of human physiology and applied science as it pertains to various grade levels, adults, and seniors. Movement analysis of the human body will be studied as to variables, exercise responses, training principles, adaptation, and modalities. Physiological response of human body system will be explored relevant to wellness and fitness.

  
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    EXER 5020. Exercise, Sport, and Coaching Psychology (3 credits)


    Course will examine topics related to the potential for optimal human athletic and exercise performance at various life stages. Areas of study will include functional behavior, behavior modification, psychology of human and work motivation, self-assertion, personality, gender differences, visual and auditory perception, and stages and processes of behavior development and decision-making.

  
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    EXER 5030. Advanced Teaching Methodologies in Health/PE (3 credits)


    This course focuses on health/PE teaching instruction needed for learning, planning, and implementing health and physical education teaching techniques. Students will analyze various teaching models, practical application, and critical reflection.

  
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    EXER 5040. Recreation, Leisure, and Tourism (3 credits)


    A comprehensive study of the basic concepts of organized recreation and its philosophy and implementation. An in-depth overview of practices, methods, and processes of leadership, supervision, staff development, etc. as well as a thorough examination and study of the organization and administration of recreation management, logistics, legal issues, etc.

  
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    EXER 5050. Health, Wellness and Fitness Administration (3 credits)


    Course will include in-depth coverage of the dimensions of health, wellness & fitness. The course is intended to provide knowledge and skills that will enable humans to achieve an optimal healthy lifestyle regardless of age or gender. Emphasis will be placed on making correct choices based on sound principles of researched and applied science and human biological study. The course will present the various options, strategies, issues and implications surrounding the bases of human wellness.

  
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    EXER 5060. Current Issues and Trends in Health, PE, and Sport (3 credits)


    Course will be designed for formulating, designing, and implementing meaningful research into timely and practical wellness issues in health, physical education and/or sports, particularly in K‐12 settings. Topics relative to health and physical educators, coaches, fitness coordinators, etc., will be researched and discussed. Society health, fitness, wellness, and athletic concerns will be researched and debated.

  
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    EXER 5070. The Law in PE and Sport (3 credits)


    Course will be a thorough investigation and review of the legal and judicial issues, cases, and history of litigation in physical education and sport. Case research, analysis of law, and current legal issues that apply to physical educators and coaches will be examined in detail. Professional liability, statutory, and landmark cases in movement education will be studied.

  
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    EXER 5080. Facility Design and Management (3 credits)


    Course will examine basic principles and practices of planning, designing, managing, operation of, maintenance of, security for, scheduling, crowd/risk management, adaptive barriers for, etc of facilities for PE, sport, recreation, health, fitness, etc.

  
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    EXER 5090. Promotion and Marketing of PE and Sport (3 credits)


    Course will examine promotion and marketing principles such as marketing concepts, ethics, strategies, customer analysis, activity promotion, advertising, publication, sponsorship, endorsements, sales promotion, merchandising, public relations, etc., specific to the perspective of athletic directors, head coaches, school administrators, fitness administrators, etc.

  
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    EXER 5100. Leadership and Management in Health, PE and Sport (3 credits)


    Course will examine the basic skills and techniques in leadership and management to include, but not limited to, leadership styles, problem-solving, decision-making, planning, budgeting, delegation, communications, self-management, supervision, staffing, accountability, time management, etc. A major part of the course will deal with proper leadership/management in health, PE, and sport issues in K‐12 educational settings.

  
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    EXER 5110. Conflict Resolution in PE/Sport (3 credits)


    Course will address conflict analysis and resolution associated with PE and sport environments. Both team and individual conflict situations will be discussed along with possible solutions. PE teacher/ coach resolution and problem-solving methodologies will be covered along with mediation techniques.

  
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    EXER 5120. Advanced Methodologies in Health/PE II (3)


    This course is designed to explore physical education teaching methods and strategies with specific emphasis on designing and delivering learning experiences for secondary level students. Students will be instructed on how to provide appropriate learning experiences and assessment techniques in Health and Physical Education. Instructional content development, student motivation and inclusion techniques along with observational tools will also be covered. NOTE: A grade of B or better is required of all students pursuing licensure degree programs.

  
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    EXER 5810. Internship in Health and Physical Education (3 credits)


    Ten week, full-time internship experiences in an off-campus public school setting appropriate to the licensure area of Health and Physical Education.   PREREQ: Grade of "B" or better in EXER 5030 and EXER 5120; Approval of Graduate Program Director

  
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    EXER 5980. Research Methodology (3 credits)


    Course will address graduate-level research design and methodology to include hypotheses, human subject(s) ethics and protocol, data collection, sampling, measurement, statistics, data interpretation, data analysis, etc.

  
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    EXER 5990. Capstone Study (3 credits)


    Each student must successfully complete an original, rigorous, and significant research project. The capstone project may be a thesis and will be supervised by appropriate Health and Human Performance Department graduate faculty. Any project must have prior approval of the Health and Human Performance Graduate Committee. Must be repeated for credit in consecutive semesters until the final document has been successfully completed and defended.

  
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    EXER 6000. Thesis (3 credits)


    Each student must successfully complete an original, rigorous, and significant research project that results in a thesis and is supervised by appropriate Health and Human Performance department faculty.  Any project that results in a thesis must have prior approval of the Health and Human Performance Graduate Committee.  This course must be repeated for credit in consecutive semesters until the final document has been successfully completed and defended. The course is designed to personalize the research experience and support the completion of research plans (proposal) established in EDN 5440, EDN 5660, or EXER 5980.  PREREQ: EXER 5980 or EDN 5440 or EDN 5660 and IRB approval of research proposal

  
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    HHP 3270. Funding and Grant Writing (1 credit)


    Practical experience in researching and writing grant proposals, fund-raising, etc., as it applies to possible avenues for funding from a variety of potential sources to support a variety of exercise, fitness, recreational, sport, and other human movement activities.

  
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    HHP 4000. Applied Research (3)


    This course will provide students with the tools necessary to generate research interests, develop appropriate research methods, collect data, test hypotheses through the manipulation of that data, and generate critical evaluations of their findings relevant to the industry. PREREQ: 90 credit hours passed

  
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    HHP 4030. Facilities Design (3 credits)


    Course will provide an introduction to planning, designing, architecture, budgeting, and construction of both indoor and outdoor facilities for PE, recreation, health, athletic training, gymnasiums, playing fields, etc. Design and construction areas such as aquatics, dance, ball fields, playgrounds, handicap accessibility, etc., will be addressed.

  
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    HHP 4150. Organization and Administration of Physical Education and Athletics (3 credits)


    A study of the organization and administration of physical education and athletics with particular reference to management, logistics, legal issues, budgeting, facilities, etc.

  
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    HHP 4160. Leadership in Health and Human Performance (3)


    In this course, students will analyze leadership through experience-based learning, investigate various styles of leadership and communication, and examine techniques for planning large and small group meetings.

  
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    HHP 4920. Three-Credit Internship (3 credits)


    A practical work experience in a health promotion setting, e.g., hospital, public health agency or industry supervised by an on‑site supervisor and a UNCP faculty member. Majors must have at least a 2.0 QPA within the major to be eligible for the internship.

  
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    HHP 4999. Internship (6 credits)


    Intern will be assigned practical, related field/work experience and be supervised by an on-site supervisor. The intern must get all arrangements satisfied with the program coordinator early in the semester before the internship begins. PREREQ: Approval of program director.


History

  
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    HST 1010. American Civilizations to 1877 (3 credits)


    A survey of the major political, economic, social, and cultural developments in the United States to 1877, with some attention to Canada.

  
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    HST 1020. American Civilizations since 1877 (3 credits)


    A survey of the major political, economic, social, and cultural developments in the United States since 1877, with some attention to Canada.

  
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    HST 1030. Introduction to African-American History (3 credits)


    This course will provide students with a survey of the experiences of peoples of African descent in the Americas, with special focus on the United States, Brazil, and the Caribbean. Major comparative themes will include the origins and development of plantation slavery, the process of abolition, and struggles for economic and political equality after emancipation. In addition, students will explore diverse African American religious, literary, and musical traditions.

  
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    HST 1100. History of the American Indian to 1865 (3 credits)


    Crosslisted: (AIS 1100)
    A survey of North American Indian history from arrival in the Western Hemisphere to 1865, with emphasis on intertribal and Euro‑American relationships, prominent personages, political and economic developments, and adaptation to White culture.

  
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    HST 1110. History of the American Indian since 1865 (3 credits)


    Crosslisted: (AIS 1110)
    A survey of North American Indian history since 1865, with emphasis on intertribal and Euro- American relationships, prominent personages, political and economic developments, and adaptation to White culture.

  
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    HST 1140. World Civilizations to 1500 (3 credits)


    A survey of the birth and diffusion of world civilizations from "pre‑history" to 1500, with attention to major cultural, social, economic, and political trends within each civilization. The emergence of European civilization is set within a larger framework of civilizations in Africa, Asia, and Latin America, and interactions between or among civilizations are stressed.

  
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    HST 1150. World Civilizations since 1500 (3 credits)


    A survey of world civilizations from 1500 to the present, with attention to major cultural, social, economic, and political trends within each civilization. Emphasis is given the interaction between an expanding European civilization and non‑Western civilizations in Africa, Asia, and Latin America.

  
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    HST 2010. An Introduction to American Studies (3 credits)


    An introduction to the field of American Studies through investigation of major works, through the examination of important issues, and through the interpretation of the various methods and approaches used in the study of the development of American history and culture. Exploration of the theme of a national culture will be central to this course.

  
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    HST 2140. Introduction to British Studies (3 credits)


    This course offers an inter-disciplinary study of the broad topic of British Studies. It examines and discusses a number of texts concerned with and describing the religious, cultural, literary, and social evolution of Great Britain within the context of an historical survey.

  
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    HST 2220. Introduction to Asian Studies (3 credits)


    Crosslisted: (PHI 2220/PLS 2220)
    An introduction to the field of Asian Studies through an interdisciplinary perspective combining history, politics, economics, philosophy, and culture using a variety of theories, methodologies, and sources (textbook, book chapters, articles, literature). The course focuses on East Asia (China, Japan, Korea) but will also include India, Southeast Asia, and other countries. PREREQ: C or better in ENG 1050.

  
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    HST 3000. Historical Practice and Theory (3 credits)


    Development of concepts and skills essential to the work of professional historians. This course addresses the following topics: the nature and types of history; the critical reading and analysis of primary and secondary sources; efficient and ethical research practices; writing skills; documentation style; and presentation and public speaking skills. Common readings and research assignments will reflect the instructor's area[s] of expertise. The course is required for History and Social Studies Education majors, and it should be taken at the end of the sophomore or beginning of the junior year. This course is designed to prepare students for success in all advanced History courses. This course also fulfills the Writing in the Discipline (WD) requirement. PREREQ: ENG 1060  AND at least two of the following courses: HON 2000 , HST 1010 , HST 1020 , HST 1030 , HST 1100 , HST 1110 , HST 1140 , HST 1150 , HST 1200 , HST 2010 , or HST 2140 ; or permission of instructor.

  
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    HST 3028. Cultural and Religious History of China (3 credits)


    Crosslisted: (REL 3028)
    The course introduces students to the diverse religious traditions of China within the context of Chinese culture, in particular the interaction between religion, culture, and society throughout the nation's history. It reviews (1) the major concepts and ideas of each religion; (2) the historical background of the emergence or transmission of each religion; and (3) some facets that religions played out in the cultural and political life of China.

  
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    HST 3029. Cultural and Religious History of Korea and Japan (3 credits)


    Crosslisted: (REL 3029)
    The course introduces students to the diverse religious traditions of Korea and Japan: Confucianism, Buddhism, Shamanism, Christianity, Shintoism, and various new religions. The course considers these traditions within the context of their culture, in particular the interaction between religion, culture, and society throughout the history of the two countries. The course reviews (1) the major concepts and ideas of each religion; (2) the historical background of the emergence or transmission of each religion; and (3) some facets that religions played out in the cultural and political life of Korea and Japan.

  
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    HST 3040. Jacksonian America (3 credits)


    This course explores life in the United States between 1815 and 1848, tracing the origins of economic, political, and social trends that shaped the country well into the twentieth century. Main areas of inquiry include early industrialization, the growth of a nationwide transportation network, the emergence of a popular political culture and flourishing two-party system, the origins of a distinct middle-class identity and lifestyle, religious and social reform, the expansion of slavery, and the causes and consequences of "Manifest Destiny."

  
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    HST 3050. The American Colonies (3 credits)


    This course examines British North America from the founding of its colonies to the conclusion of the French and Indian War. It focuses on Britain's exploration and settlement of North America, the Anglo-American relationship, the forces shaping the colonies' development, the evolution of American politics, the impact of war, and the nature of intellectual and spiritual life.

  
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    HST 3060. Revolution and the Young Republic (3 credits)


    Between 1763 and 1815, Americans fought two major wars, won their independence, established one national government only to replace it by another, expanded rapidly into the west, and laid the foundation for a lasting democracy. This course examines the origins and impact of the American Revolution, constitution and nation-making, the evolving political culture, and the meaning of the Revolution for various groups in the early republic.

  
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    HST 3100. Civil War and Reconstruction (3 credits)


    The course addresses the pivotal events in the two decades before the first shot of the Civil War was fired, the military, political, and social history of the Civil War, and the aftermath of emancipation in the southern states. In addition, attention is paid to the Reconstruction era when the southern states constructed new governments and reentered the Union.

  
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    HST 3140. The Gilded Age and Progressive Era (3 credits)


    In the years 1877-1919, the United States initiated a rapid transition form an agricultural nation to an industrialized one. This course will examine the construction of railroads, the rise of business tycoons, eruptions of labor unrest, and the arrival of millions of European immigrants. Two significant political movements, Populism and Progressivism, emerged to grapple with these changes and greatly influenced subsequent political ideas.

  
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    HST 3150. Interwar America (3 credits)


    This class explores how America dealt with the challenges facing a newly modernized nation between the First World War and the Second World War. Included in this conversation are political developments and a new role in global affairs; the creation of a mass society, culture, and economy; confronting the problems of consumer society's prosperity and its collapse into the Great Depression; and debating what role, if any, America must play in the larger world in the face of World War II.

  
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    HST 3160. Recent America, 1945‑Present (3 credits)


    An analysis of political, economic, and social conditions since 1945.

  
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    HST 3170. History of North Carolina (3 credits)


    A study of selected phases of the development of North Carolina from its colonial beginnings to the present.

  
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    HST 3210. Ancient History (3 credits)


    A survey of ancient history from the beginnings of civilization to A.D. 500.

  
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    HST 3230. The Middle Ages (3 credits)


    A survey of the development of western cultures from the fall of Rome to the Renaissance.

  
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    HST 3260. Indians of the Southeast (3 credits)


    Crosslisted: (AIS 3260)
    A thorough examination of the history, culture, interaction, and present condition of the major tribes of southeastern America.

  
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    HST 3270. Early Modern Europe, 1500‑1789 (3 credits)


    A survey of European history from the Renaissance to the French Revolution.

  
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    HST 3290. Revolution, Liberalism, and Nationalism in Europe, 1789‑1914 (3 credits)


    A survey of European civilization from the French Revolution to the outbreak of the First World War.

  
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    HST 3320. Twentieth Century Europe (3 credits)


    A study of conflict and cooperation in an era of global war, with emphasis on the interaction of democracy, communism, fascism, and imperialism.

  
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    HST 3370. Modern European Economic and Social History (3 credits)


    A survey of the European economy and social classes from the birth of capitalism to the present.

  
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    HST 3410. U.S. Economic History (3 credits)


    Crosslisted: (ECN 3410)
    A thematic study of the economy of the United States from colonization to the present.

  
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    HST 3440. History of Modern East Asia (3 credits)


    A history of China, Japan, and Korea, with special attention to the problems of modernization.

  
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    HST 3450. The United States and East Asia (3 credits)


    A study of the major factors and the processes concerning American involvement in the Far East from the beginning of the Republic to the present; to include the nature of the international system in the Far East and changing American interest and policies in the region.

  
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    HST 3610. African‑American History to 1863 (3 credits)


    The course begins with a discussion of modern slavery and its introduction into the Western Hemisphere with special emphasis on the continent of North America. In addition, it examines the differing patterns of slavery in the north and south, slave revolts, and slave culture until Emancipation in 1863.

 

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