Nov 26, 2021  
The University of North Carolina at Pembroke 2017-2018 Catalog 
    
The University of North Carolina at Pembroke 2017-2018 Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Computer Science

  
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    CSC 4020. Introduction to Computer and Network Security (3 credits)


    This course provides an introduction to the theory and application of security in computer and network environments. Students will develop the skills necessary to address the security needs of enterprise and personal environments. The course covers cryptography, authentication, access control, security in operating systems, network security, and denial-of-service. Course projects will focus on the application of security tools to real world problems. PREREQ: CSC 2260 .

  
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    CSC 4050. Current Topics in Computers in Education (3 credits)


    The application of computer software in the classroom, including integration of software with lesson plans. Additional topics include matching software to the most appropriate hardware. This course is designed as a pre‑service course for teachers and may not be used as an advanced MAT or CSC requirement. It is not to be counted toward the Mathematics Concentration at the Graduate level. PREREQ: Permission of instructor.

  
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    CSC 4150. Translators and Compilers (4 credits)


    This course covers interpreters, assemblers, and compilers. The student will study grammar, languages, syntax, semantics, and BNF. Course material covers parsing, symbol tables, one- and two-pass compilers, and code generation. The course has a programming project. PREREQ: CSC 4010 .

  
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    CSC 4350. Operating Systems (3 credits)


    This course covers the basic functions of an operating system. Topics covered include process manage ment and scheduling, memory management and paging algorithms, I/O management, file management, deadlock, and operating system security. PREREQ: MAT 2220 .

  
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    CSC 4360. Mainframe Computing (3 credits)


    This course covers the basic features of the mainframe computer. It builds on previous introductory courses in computer system concepts, such as computer organization and architecture, operating systems, data management, or data communications. Topics covered include mainframe hardware systems, Job Control Language (JCL), System Display and Search Facility (SDSF), Time Sharing Options and Extensions (TSO/E), Batch Processing, Interactive Systems, Linux, and other related topics. PREREQ: CSC 4350 .

  
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    CSC 4450. Design and Analysis of Algorithms (3 credits)


    This course covers time and space complexity of algorithms. Survey of various design techniques such as "divide and conquer" and the "greedy" method is covered. Program verification and validation as well as NPComplete and NPHard problems are discussed. PREREQ: CSC 2850 , and MAT 2220 .

  
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    CSC 4810. Data Mining (3 credits)


    This course covers the principles underlying data mining algorithms and their applications. Algorithms that include trees and rules for classification and regression, association rules, belief networks, classical statistical models, nonlinear models such as neural networks, and local "memorybased" models are presented and examined. Examples showing how all of the preceding analysis fits together are presented. Topics include the role of metadata, how to handle missing data, and data preprocessing. PREREQ: CSC 3800 .

  
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    CSC 4820. Data Warehousing (3 credits)


    The basic elements of data warehousing are described. Topics of project management, defining business requirements, the architecture and infrastructure, the role of metadata, implementation, growth, and maintenance are covered. PREREQ: CSC 3800 .

  
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    CSC 4900. Advanced Software Project (4 credits)


    An assigned, group or individual, in-depth programming project includes problem definition, requirements analysis, design, implementation, documentation, and testing. PREREQ: CSC 2250  and CSC 2850 .

  
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    CSC 4970. Computer Science Internship (1-3 credits)


    Fully declared undergraduates in Computer Science who have completed CSC 2850  and are in good standing (at least a 2.5 GPA) are eligible for internships in business and industry.  This is a pass/fail course. The course may be repeated, but no more than three hours will be applied as a major elective. Detailed requirements and application form are maintained by Coordinator of CS/IT Internships. PREREQ: CSC 2850  and approval of Department Chair.

  
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    CSC 4990. Independent Study (1-3 credits)


    Open to seniors in Computer Science with a quality point average of 3.0 in the major and with approval of the Department Chair. Written and oral reports are required.

  
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    CSC 5050. Current Topics in Computers in Education (3 credits)


    Crosslisted: (MATH 5080)
    An inservice course in the comparison and evaluation of computer hardware configurations and computer software packages for the classroom. The mechanics of setting up a computer network. A consideration of the effect that computers in the classroom have on curriculum development. A laboratory experience will be an integral part of the course.

  
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    CSC 5080. Computer Graphics for the Mathematics Teacher (3 credits)


    This course introduces graphics appropriate to classroom settings at the pre‑college level. Graphics that will be dealt with include various algebraic, geometric, and trigonometric relations. Methods that will be used include direct programming as well as the introduction of commercially available software designed for this purpose.

  
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    CSC 5090. Programming and Algorithms for the Mathematics Teacher I (3 credits)


    Techniques for problem solving in a mathematical setting through programming in a high level language. The efficiency of algorithms and the design of programs are considered. CSC 2020  or its equivalent is required background for this course.

  
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    CSC 5100. Programming and Algorithms for the Mathematics Teacher II (3 credits)


    Advanced techniques for problem solving in a mathematics setting through programming in a high level language. Emphasis is given to data structures and object-oriented design. An individual indepth programming project including design, implementation, testing, and documentation of each phase is required. PREREQ: CSC 5090  or instructor permission.

  
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    CSC 5110. Computer Hardware in an Educational Setting (3 credits)


    A study of the various components that make up computer configurations in public school settings. Comparison of the various types of computer hardware available for use in the school. Particular attention will be given to evaluation of hardware for laboratory situations with both individual and networking of computers and computer terminals.

  
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    CSC 5120. Database Management for Teachers (3 credits)


    Goals of DBMS including data independence, relationships, logical organizations, schema and subschema. Designing databases including lossless join, dependence preserving normal form decompositions. Using relational database management systems. Constructing applications which include databases. Data integrity and reliability. PREREQ: CSC 5100  or permission of instructor and program coordinator.

  
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    CSC 5130. Computer Systems for Teachers (3 credits)


    Basic logic design; sequential circuits; digital storage and access. Computer structure, machine and assembly language, and addressing modes. I/O and interrupt structure. Operating system concepts. Examples from microcomputer operating systems. PREREQ: CSC 5100  or permission of instructor and program coordinator.


Special Topics in Computer Science

  
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    CSCS 4xxx. Special Topics (Variable Title) (3 credits)


    A study of special topics in computer science. The selected topics will be an in-depth study of a content area, or they will be selected over the breadth of a content area. PREREQ: Permission of instructor.


Decision Sciences

  
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    DSC 1590. Technology-Enabled Decision Making (3 credits)


    This course introduces pertinent elements of computer applications as they relate to making informed decisions. New and emerging learning technologies are introduced and employed to accentuate critical thinking and problem solving skills. Additionally, the course emphasizes effective communication and collaboration in a technology-rich learning environment. Excel spreadsheets are introduced and utilized extensively in this course. Other techniques taught include collection, analysis, interpretation, and presentation of data as well as the effective use of Internet search tools and electronic databases.

  
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    DSC 2090. Spreadsheet and Database Management (3 credits)


    A comprehensive course in advanced spreadsheet analysis and the fundamentals of database management. The focal point in this course will be on the use of spreadsheet analysis and database management to address contemporary business problems. Students should have experience using spreadsheets.

  
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    DSC 3130. Business Statistics I (3 credits)


    A study of descriptive statistics including functional and summation notation, describing data graphically and numerically, and probability distributions. PREREQ: C or better in MAT 1070  or a higher-level mathematics class.

  
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    DSC 3140. Business Statistics II (3 credits)


    A study of statistical inference including probability theory, random variables and probability distributions, testing hypotheses, estimating unknown parameters, analysis of variance, and linear and multiple regression. PREREQ: A "C" or better in DSC 3130.

  
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    DSC 3140. Business Statistics II (3 credits)


    A study of statistical inference including probability theory, random variables and probability distributions, testing hypotheses, estimating unknown parameters, analysis of variance, and linear and multiple regression. PREREQ: A "C" or better in DSC 3130 .

  
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    DSC 3650. Management Science (3 credits)


    The mathematical concepts application to the solution of management problems. Topics include linear programming, decision theory, optimization, queuing theory, and transportation modeling. PREREQ: DSC 3140 , MGT 3060 .

  
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    DSC 4420. Supply Chain Management (3 credits)


    Crosslisted: (MGT 4420)
    Introduces students to new and emerging topics, tools, and techniques in operations and supply chain management. The course emphasizes coordination, integration, and decision making regarding the interaction of the firm with its suppliers and customers, where planning, design, and control of all aspects of supply chains including design and control of material and information systems, supplier development, supplier selection, customer relationship management and quality issues such as outsourcing in supply chain are discussed. PREREQ: ECN 2020  and ECN 2030 , DSC 3130 , MAT 1070 , ITM 3010 .

  
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    DSC 4990. Directed Studies in Decision Sciences (1-3 credits)


    Independent study in an area of decision sciences of particular interest to a student under the direction of one or more faculty members. Students must submit detailed proposals for a directed study, detailing the proposed plan of study, research involved, dates for deliverables, final product to be produced, and faculty who will be supervising. Proposals will be reviewed by a faculty committee to determine acceptance of the proposal. PREREQ: DSC 2090 , DSC 3130 .

  
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    DSC 5010. Foundations of Analytical Methods (4 credits)


    This course equips prospective MBA students with the means and methods of quantitative reasoning through a concise and applied process, which includes introduction to the concepts of mathematical economics, mathematical finance, and business mathematics. The course will cover essentials of algebra with business and economic applications and essentials of calculus with business and economic applications. Upon completing the course students will be able to apply mathematical thinking and quantitative reasoning to solve problems in MBA-level accounting, economics, finance, marketing, and management classes. The applications of concepts include, but are not limited to, Pricing and Inventory Control; Payrolls and Banking; Taxes; Simple Interest; Compound Interest; Annuities; Sinking Funds and Amortization; Accounting; Productivity and Costs, Constrained Optimization (consumer and producer theories); Market Equilibrium; and Elasticities of Demand and Supply. (This course will not count toward the 36 hours required for the MBA degree.)

  
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    DSC 5050. Foundations of Business Statistics (3 credits)


    This course is an accelerated course designed for students with no statistics background or as a refresher course for students who desire to review statistical methods before enrolling in required MBA courses. Intensive examination of statistical and graphical methods of analyzing quantitative information. Specific topics include frequency distribution, probability, sampling, T-tests, correlation, various graphic forms, regression analysis, and analysis of variance. (This course will not count toward the 36 hours required for the MBA degree.)

  
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    DSC 5100. Quantitative Methods (3 credits)


    Intermediate level quantitative skills in multivariate statistics, optimization, and decision-making which will be used in subsequent MBA courses. Topics will include multiple regression, multivariate ANOVA, logistic regression, factor analysis, and linear programming. Computer software will be used.

  
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    DSC 5120. Research Methods (3 credits)


    This course details the methods employed in defining business problems, research design, primary and secondary data sources, methods of data collection, scaling methods, sampling techniques, and report preparation. Through case analyses, literature reviews and research projects, this applications oriented course focuses on improving decision making.

  
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    DSC 5190. Data Analytics for Business (3 credits)


    Covers basic programming procedures such as those in R, Python, and other comparable analytic software. Topics include importing and exporting different types of data, managing data frame, writing basic scripts, debugging, reading from and writing to files, and conducting data analyses in business. PREREQ: DSC 5050 or equivalent

  
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    DSC 5240. Business Analytics (3 credits)


    This course covers a variety of intermediate statistical tools which are used in business data analytics and discusses ways to determine how well the assumptions that underlie these methods describe real-world data problems. Topics include multiple regression and diagnostics tests, categorical response models, cluster analysis, factor and latent variables analysis. PREREQ: DSC 5050 or equivalent. 

  
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    DSC 5550. Time Series Analysis (3 credits)


    A review of statistical methods for analysis of business time-series data. Use of these methods for forecasting will also be discussed. The methods surveyed include smoothing methods, filters, ARIMA models, vector autoregressive models, and cointegration models. PREREQ: DSC 5050 or equivalent

  
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    DSC 5600. Project in Business Analytics (3 credits)


    This course will bring together fundamentals of business analytics related to database management, data analysis techniques and business decision making to solve a real-world business problem. Specific emphasis will be given on problem identification, data selection, model building, data driven diagnosis, reporting and presentation on industry behavior based on the data. This course will give students the experience of working in a Business Analytic team.        PREREQ: DSC 5190, DSC 5240, and DSC 5550.

  
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    DSC 5990. Directed Studies (3 credits)


    Independent study in an area of business administration of particular interest to a student under the direction of one or more faculty members. Students must submit detailed proposals for a directed study, detailing the proposed plan of study, research involved, dates for deliverables, final product to be produced and faculty who will be supervising. Proposals will be reviewed by a faculty committee to determine acceptance of the proposal.


Special Topics in Decision Sciences

  
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    DSCS 4xxx. Special Topics in Decision Sciences (3 credits)


    The study of a particular topic of special importance, relevance, and currency in the broad field of decision sciences. The content of the special topics course varies with each offering. Course may be repeated as long as topic being studied is different. PREREQ: DSC 2090 , DSC 3130 .

  
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    DSCS 5xxx. Special Topics (3 credits)


    The study of a particular topic of special importance, relevance, and currency to students in the Master of Business Administration program. The content of the special topics course varies with each offering and may be taken twice.


Birth to Kindergarten

  
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    ECE 2020. Foundations of Early Childhood Education (3 credits)


    This course is designed to introduce students to the field of early childhood education. Topics include the history, theories, and approaches of early childhood education, professional roles and expectations, and current trends in the field. All topics will be explored using the perspective that diversity influences both development and implementation of early childhood programs and practices. PREREQ: Must have no less than a 2.0 overall QPA.

  
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    ECE 2030. The Developing Young Child (3 credits)


    This course is designed to systematically explore the development of young children from conception to early childhood. Emphasis will be placed on the principles and theories of child development, as well as the interconnectedness among theory, research, and practice. There is a required field experience in this course. PREREQ: Must have no less than a 2.0 overall QPA.

  
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    ECE 2040. The Child as Teacher (3 credits)


    This course provides an opportunity to interact with young children as an observer of their behavior. Emphasis will be placed on students' acquisition of observation skills to facilitate planning of appropriate learning experiences for individuals and groups within early childhood education settings. There is a required field experience in this course. PREREQ: Must have no less than a 2.0 overall QPA.

  
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    ECE 2050. Young Children and Families in a Diverse World (3 credits)


    This course is designed to offer students the opportunity to examine the critical importance of values and beliefs related to culture, ethnicity and language traditions. Focus on the practice of culturally sensitive interventions and effective communication and interaction among family, school, and other professionals will allow students to develop the skills to become culturally competent early childhood educators. There is a required field experience in this course. PREREQ: Must have no less than a 2.0 overall QPA.

  
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    ECE 3110. Behavior and Environments for Early Childhood Education (3 credits)


    This course is designed to help address the growing questions posed by many early childhood professionals regarding the "whys?" of a child's challenging behavior. Research-validated practices will be presented that will help future and current professionals understand and address a child's persistent behavior(s) and create environments to encourage young children to use socially appropriate behaviors in early childhood and kindergarten settings. There is a required field experience in this course. PREREQ: Admission to Teacher Education

  
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    ECE 3120. Community Partnerships with Families & Agencies (3 credits)


    This course provides students with theory, general principles, and procedures for developing collaborative partnerships with families, young children, professionals, and other stakeholders. Emphasis is placed on a comprehensive review of family systems theory and its application to diverse families who have young children with disabilities. Principles are presented that support the establishment, facilitation, and maintenance of family-professional and professional-professional partnerships. There is a required field experience in this course. PREREQ: Must have no less than a 2.0 overall QPA.

  
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    ECE 3130. Early Childhood Educators as Leaders (3 credits)


    This course examines the leadership role of the early childhood educator. Topics include qualities of leaders, leadership skills development, early childhood professional organizations and their contributions to the field of early childhood education, and strategies for using leadership skills in the classroom, school, and community. There is a required field experience in this course. PREREQ: Must have no less than a 2.0 overall QPA.

  
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    ECE 3140. Health Issues in Birth - Kindergarten Education (3 credits)


    This course will prepare early childhood professionals to identify and address the special health, safety and nutrition issues of young children, birth-5 years, with and without disabilities, in a variety of educational settings. Students will demonstrate competence in strategies required to manage health issues in classroom settings, collaborate with other professionals, and to communicate with parents in caring for the health needs of young children. PREREQ: Must have no less than a 2.0 overall QPA.

  
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    ECE 4010. Integrated Curricula and Appropriate Practices: Infants & Toddlers (3 credits)


    This course is designed to explore the unique educational and developmental needs of infants and toddlers in home and group settings. Emphasis will be placed on designing early learning environments to facilitate development of cognitive, language, physical, and social-emotional skills as well as on family involvement in the education of these young children. There is a required field experience in this course. PREREQ: Admission to Teacher Education

  
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    ECE 4020. Integrated Curricula and Appropriate Practices: Preschoolers (3 credits)


    This course provides a study of curricula and program models appropriate for implementation in inclusive preschool classrooms. Emphasis will be placed on integration of disciplines through application of Foundations: Early Learning Standards for North Carolina Preschoolers, ages 3-4 years. Participants will plan and implement center-based instructional activities designed to motivate young children to engage in discovery learning, as well as engage in assessment of children and reflection of teaching. There is a required field experience in this course. PREREQ: PREQ: Admission to Teacher Education

  
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    ECE 4030. Integrated Curricula and Appropriate Practices: Kindergarteners (3 credits)


    This course provides a study of curricula and program models appropriate for implementation in the inclusive kindergarten classroom. Emphasis is placed on integration of disciplines through developmentally appropriate application of NC Standard Course of Study and methods to motivate young children to engage in active learning. Planning, implementation, assessment and reflection are critical components of the course. There is a required field experience in this course. PREREQ: PREQ: Admission to Teacher Education

  
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    ECE 4040. Differentiation, Individualization, and Universal Design (3 credits)


    This course provides the opportunity to learn about variations in learning styles and student needs while examining strategies to individualize instruction within inclusive classrooms for young children. Topics addressed in this course include: differentiation and individualization of instruction; universal design for learning (UDL); strategies for developing and implementing modifications and accommodations; and appropriate use of technology to meet individual student needs. There is a required field experience in this course. PREREQ: Admission to Teacher Education

  
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    ECE 4050. Practicum I (4 credits)


    This practicum provides opportunities to refine and implement assessment and leadership skills developed in prerequisite courses. Students will work with an agency partner that provides services to families of young children with and without disabilities to conduct program evaluations. PREREQ: Admission to the Teacher Education Program AND completion of, or simultaneous enrollment in, the following: ECE 3120 , ECE 3130 , and ECE 4060 .

  
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    ECE 4060. Assessment Strategies and Application (3 credits)


    This course is designed to provide an understanding of standardized and authentic screening and diagnostic assessment practices as used with young children ages birth through five years. Students will develop proficiency in using assessment manuals, protocols, and instruments. In addition, students will develop competencies in reading and interpreting assessment reports to develop Individualized Family Service Plans (IFSP), Individualized Education Plans (IEP), and modifying classroom lesson plans to meet individual student needs. There is a required field experience in this course. PREREQ: Admission to Teacher Education

  
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    ECE 4070. Practicum II (4 credits)


    This practicum provides opportunities to determine the learning needs of preschoolers and kindergartners with and without disabilities. Emphasis will be placed on creating caring, developmentally and ability appropriate environments, events, and lessons for individuals and groups of students. PREREQ: Admission to the Teacher Education Program AND completion of, or simultaneous enrollment in, the following: ECE 4020 , ECE 4030 , and ECE 4040 .

  
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    ECE 4080. Early Language and Literacy (3 credits)


    This course provides a critical examination of the major areas of speaking, listening, reading, and writing experiences of young children. It outlines key understandings central to young children's early literacy development. Course topics will include guiding principles for developing children's early literacy skills, language development stages, theories of language acquisition, linguistic diversity, language assessment, communicative disorders, and school-home connections.  This course will meet synchronously online and may require a field experience. PREREQ: Admission to TEP

  
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    ECE 4150. Agency Partners (3 credits)


    This course provides opportunities to refine and implement assessment and leadership skills developed in prerequisite courses. Students will work with an agency partner that provides services to families of young children with and without disabilities to conduct program evaluations. PREREQ: Admission to the Teacher Education Program AND completion of, or simultaneous enrollment in, the following: ECE 3120 , ECE 3130 , and ECE 4060 .

  
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    ECE 4170. Learning Environments and Teaching in Preschool and Kindergarten (3 credits)


    This course provides opportunities to determine the learning needs of preschoolers and kindergartners with and without disabilities. Emphasis will be placed on creating caring, developmentally and ability appropriate environments, events, and lessons for individuals and groups of students. PREREQ: Admission to the Teacher Education Program AND completion of, or simultaneous enrollment in, the following: ECE 4020 , ECE 4030 , 2186 and ECE 4040 .

  
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    ECE 4460. Internship in Birth-Kindergarten Programs (9 credits)


    This course is designed to provide a semester long full-time internship experience in a public school or other DPI-approved early childhood setting. Intensive field experience is an opportunity to teach children and work with families in home, school, and community settings. PREREQ: Admission to the Professional Semester. COREQ: ECE 4750 .

  
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    ECE 4500. Practicum for Professionals in Pre-Kindergarten Settings (3 credits)


    This course is designed to assist practicing pre-kindergarten teachers (lateral entry) without BK licensure as they develop and refine the skills necessary to apply successful instructional practices while having the lead in their classroom in the early childhood classroom setting. Emphasis will be placed on understanding the role of the practitioner and implementation of developmentally and individually appropriate practices with pre-kindergarteners. Students will reflect upon current theory and research as they integrate and develop professional skills. PREREQ: Admission to the Professional Semester and completion of all coursework in the student's Licensure Education Plan. COREQ: none

  
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    ECE 4750. Professional Seminar for Pre-service Birth-Kindergarten Teachers (3 credits)


    Seminar designed to parallel the full semester internship experience. Emphasis is on helping these on-site pre-service teachers understand the purpose, organization, and administration of various service delivery sites; and the role of a Birth-Kindergarten practitioner. Students continually review and reflect on elements of the total service delivery process in early childhood education and the developmentally appropriateness of instructional approaches, assessment strategies, behavior management systems, curriculum models, and home/school/community collaboration. PREREQ: Admission to the Professional Semester. COREQ: ECE 4460 .


Economics

  
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    ECN 1000. Economics of Social Issues (3 credits)


    Economic thinking applied to persistent economic problems and issues in a market economy. Emphasis on implications for government policy rather than on the underlying theory. Topics include the nature of an economic system, demand and supply, monopolies, pollution and public goods, ethics and law, unemployment, inflation, the Federal Reserve System and money.

  
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    ECN 2020. Principles of Microeconomics (3 credits)


    This course focuses on the individual decisions in the market economy. After an overview of how a market economy works, the course develops theories of consumer behavior, the behavior of firms in various degrees of competition, and workers' decision to offer labor. Government regulation of markets is also examined.

  
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    ECN 2030. Principles of Macroeconomics (3 credits)


    This course offers an overall picture of the operation of our economy. The course focuses on how the economic system determines the level of national income, the unemployment rate, and the rate of inflation. Fiscal, monetary, and supply-side policies are discussed.

  
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    ECN 2060. Economic Geography (3 credits)


    Crosslisted: (GGY 2060)
    Geographic analysis of the location, development and distribution of major industries, resources, agricultural products, and economic services. Study of economic development problems and prospects.

  
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    ECN 2410. Asian Economies (3 credits)


    This is an introductory level course focusing on the economic systems of Asian countries, which despite diverse history, culture, politics, and society have demonstrated one similarity: rapid economic growth. The course reviews patterns of economic growth among Asian countries, highlighting institutional differences within Asia and between Asian countries and the United States, and studying the global consequences of Asian economic expansion. Countries discussed will be selected from the Middle East, the Indian subcontinent, and Southeast and North Asia. China and Japan will be discussed in depth. Particular attention is paid to successes and failures of government policies in promoting economic growth in the region, and the role of culture in shaping such policies. Economic theories such as comparative advantage and growth models will be utilized to analyze the reasons for success of certain countries and the stagnation of others. The role of the market system as well as cultural and legal factors will be studied in addressing the similarities and differences among such economies.

  
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    ECN 3010. Managerial Economics (3 credits)


    This course is a rigorous analysis of resource allocation, price determination in a market economy, consumer behavior (constrained utility maximization), theory of the firm (constrained profit maximization), and production and pricing behavior under various market structures. PREREQ: A "C" or better in MAT 2150  or MAT 2210  and in ECN 2020 .

  
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    ECN 3040. Central Banks and the Economy (3 credits)


    Crosslisted: (FIN 3040)
    Study of money, financial institutions, and markets and their roles in the economy. Coverage includes functions of financial intermediaries, structure of financial markets and financial instruments, application of time value of money to bond pricing and yield calculations, algebraic approach to the supply and demand for money and interest rate determination, term- and risk structures of interest rates, the Keynesian macroeconomic model, and the algebraic approach to analyzing the effects of money and credit on national incomes, prices, and interest rates. PREREQ: A "C" or better in MAT 1070 (or higher) and in ECN 2030

  
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    ECN 3050. Intermediate Macroeconomics (3 credits)


    This course builds upon the concepts learned in Principles of Macroeconomics. It provides a deeper understanding of the functioning of the macroeconomy and the forces of globalization. Students will learn two major macroeconomic models: the neoclassical model and the Keynesian model. Topics will include national income and its determinants, economic fluctuation and economic growth, the possible impacts of monetary and fiscal policies, and how different factors of production behave in certain economic situations. Furthermore, how changes in aggregate consumption and investment affect the economy will also be covered. PREREQ: A "C" or better in MAT 2150  or MAT 2210  and in ECN 2030 .

  
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    ECN 3070. Internet Economics (3 credits)


    Applying basic principles of economics, this course surveys the various ways that economics is applied to the area of electronic commerce and how the e-commerce revolution affects the economy. The course covers relevant applications of electronic commerce to emerging economic concepts such as virtual products, network industries, online pricing and advertising, vertical integration/vertical restraint in the online market, Internet intellectual property rights, anti-trust issues in e-commerce, online financial markets, online banking, digital cash and electronic payments, regulatory issues of online markets, the public sector and the online marketplace, Internet and security. It provides balanced examinations of how basic economic principles apply to the electronic marketplace and of how features of certain products sold in this market place required rethinking some of those principles. PREREQ: ECN 2020 .

  
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    ECN 3080. Environmental Economics (3 credits)


    This course examines the implications of economic theory and how it relates to the environment and environmental activity. The continuing conflict between market forces and environmental integrity will be the centerpiece of discussion, and the course will explain how economic theory views the relationship between economic activity and the natural world. Special emphasis is given to developing and implementing tools to evaluate environmental policies. Other topics include cost-benefit analysis, measurement of the benefits of non-market goods and costs of regulations, and the evaluation of the impact of regulations in areas such as financial markets, workplace health and safety, consumer product safety, and other contexts. PREREQ: ECN 2020 .

  
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    ECN 3090. Economics of Sports (3 credits)


    This course centers around the application of microeconomic theory to the sports industry, both at the professional and amateur sports markets. The topics include market structure, labor relations, labor market discrimination, competitive balance, market value of sports talent, and payments to players. The involvement of the government in the sports business will also be discussed. PREREQ: ECN 2020 .

  
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    ECN 3200. Mathematical Economics (3)


    This course combines two strongly related disciplines, economics and mathematics, and provides the foundations needed for students to excel in future coursework in these disciplines. Multivariable calculus and linear algebra will be taught and applied to the problems of modeling, constrained optimization, and economic dynamics. PREREQ: C or better in MAT 2150 or 2210.

  
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    ECN 3300. Public Finance (3 credits)


    A descriptive and analytical study of government revenues and government expenditures. Includes federal, state, and local levels of government. PREREQ: ECN 2020 or ECN 2030

  
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    ECN 3410. U. S. Economic History (3 credits)


    Crosslisted: (HST 3410)
    A study of the United States economy from colonization to the present. PREREQ: Permission of instructor.

  
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    ECN 3500. Survey of Ethics in Economics and Finance (3 credits)


    Crosslisted: (FIN 3500)
    A survey of the emerging field of Financial Ethics. This course will provide an overview of ethical theory and decision making, explore some of the possible sources of ethical conflicts in economics and finance, study the practice of ethical decision making in the fields of finance and economics, and employ case studies to practice methods for determining ethical decision making in financial management, investments, and financial institutions.

  
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    ECN 3600. Introduction to Econometrics (3)


    This is a basic course in econometrics. Students will acquire the necessary quantitative skills to conduct applied analyses. Topics will include hypothesis testing, multiple regression, regression diagnostics, time-series analysis and forecasting, and the interpretation of regression results. Students will be taught to use econometrics software. PREREQ: C or better in MAT 2150 or 2210, and C or better in DSC 3130 or MAT 2100.

  
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    ECN 3740. Health Economics (3 credits)


    This course will present an economic analysis of several aspects of the healthcare industry, including hospital services, physicians' services, nurses' services, the pharmaceutical industry, medical insurance, Medicare and Medicaid, HMOs and PPOs, medical tourism, and government healthcare policy. PREREQ: ECN 2020 .

  
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    ECN 4020. Industrial Organization (3 credits)


    Industrial organization is the study of industry and firm behavior. Using the basic tools of microeconomic theory and game theory, this course explores the relationships among firms in an industry or across industries by examining the nature of strategic interaction among firms. We will study theoretical models and empirical evidence for a wide variety of market phenomena. We will also introduce contract theory and its application in financial structure. PREREQ: C or better in ECN 2020  and MAT 2150  or MAT 2210 .

  
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    ECN 4060. Comparative Economic Systems (3 credits)


    A comparative study of alternative economic systems, including communism, socialism, and capitalism. PREREQ: ECN 2020 , ECN 2030 .

  
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    ECN 4070. Labor Economics (3 credits)


    Examines the nature of the labor markets and problems dealing with labor groups. Topics include history of the labor movement, union structure, labor law, collective bargaining. PREREQ: ECN 2020 .

  
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    ECN 4080. Economic Development (3 credits)


    Analysis of economic and social problems of underdeveloped regions. Theories and strategies of economic growth and development designed to accelerate solutions to these problems. PREREQ: ECN 2020 , ECN 2030 .

  
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    ECN 4110. Development of Economic Thought (3 credits)


    A basic course in the development of economic theories and doctrines, from the ancient Greeks to the present day. PREREQ: ECN 2020 , ECN 2030 .

  
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    ECN 4400. International Trade (3 credits)


    An introductory analysis of international trade relations, the nature of a country's imports and exports, costs and benefits of trade protectionism, the role of trade in the domestic economy, balance of payments, and the determination of exchange rates. PREREQ: ECN 2020 , ECN 2030 .

  
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    ECN 4800. Economics Internship (3 credits)


    This course entails a work experience in a business firm, a non-profit organization, or a government entity where the student, under academic and employer supervision, participates in the daily operations of the organization and conducts some economic analysis of the operations of the business entity (40 work hours per semester credit hour). Students must keep an extensive diary of work experiences and submit frequent reports to an academic supervisor, who is a UNCP faculty member in the Department of Economics, Finance, and Decision Sciences, who has been approved by the Chair of that department, and who will be responsible for assigning the grade in the course. Pass/Fail. PREREQ: Minimum of 90 semester hours, grades of C or better in ECN 2020  and in ECN 3010 , cumulative GPA of 2.5 or better, a declared academic major in Business Administration or Accounting, a written proposal, and written consent of Department Chair.

  
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    ECN 4990. Directed Studies in Economics (1-3 credits)


    Independent study in an area of economics of particular interest to a student under the direction of one or more faculty members. Students must submit detailed proposals for a directed study, detailing the proposed plan of study, research involved, dates for deliverables, final product to be produced and faculty who will be supervising. Proposals will be reviewed by a faculty committee to determine acceptance of the proposal. PREREQ: ECN 2020 , ECN 2030 , and permission of the Department.

  
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    ECN 5030. Foundations of Microeconomics/Macroeconomics (3 credits)


    This course is an accelerated course designed for students with no economics background or as a refresher course for students who desire to review economic principles before enrolling in required MBA courses. A study of the individual decisions in the market economy and an overall view of the operation of the economy. Specific topics include theories of consumer behavior, behavior of firms in various degrees of competition, and government regulation. Fiscal, monetary, and supply-side policies are discussed. (This course will not count toward the 36 hours required for the MBA degree.)

  
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    ECN 5100. Economics of Information (1)


    This course provides an introduction to informational problems in economic analysis. It introduces basic economic models under asymmetric information and studies the effects of digitization and technology on industry, organizational structure, and business strategy. The course covers topics including the pricing of information goods, open source and innovation, search and competition, targeted advertising, information analytics, social networks, and a variety of other topics. Economic principles are illustrated using case studies and team projects.

  
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    ECN 5150. Managerial Economics (3 credits)


    An overview of methods of economic analysis applied to the modern United States economy. Emphasis on microeconomics and managerial economics such as theory of consumer choice and demand, theory of cost, outputs, and industrial structure, analysis of efficient use of resources within an organization. Also, macroeconomic analyses including a review of monetary institutions, and theory of GNP, inflation, and the rate of unemployment.

  
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    ECN 5420. Industry Structure and Competitive Strategy (3)


    Industry structure and competitive strategy is the study of industry and firm behavior. Using the basic tools of microeconomic theory and game theory, this course explores the relationships among firms in an industry or across industries by examining the nature of strategic interaction among firms. The student will learn theoretical models and empirical evidence for a wide variety of market phenomena. The course will also introduce contract theory and its application in financial structure. PREREQ: A "C" or better in ECN 5030 or equivalent, and a "C" or better in DSC 5010 or equivalent.

  
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    ECN 5450. Global Macroeconomics (3)


    This course builds upon students' undergraduate knowledge of macroeconomics and international economics. Topics covered include domestic monetary policy, exchanges rates, balance of payments, and balance of trade. PREREQ: A "C" or better in ECN 5030 or equivalent, and a "C" or better in DSC 5010 or equivalent.

  
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    ECN 5990. Directed Studies (3 credits)


    Independent study in an area of business administration of particular interest to a student under the direction of one or more faculty members. Students must submit detailed proposals for a directed study, detailing the proposed plan of study, research involved, dates for deliverables, final product to be produced and faculty who will be supervising. Proposals will be reviewed by a faculty committee to determine acceptance of the proposal.


Special Topics in Economics

  
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    ECNS 4xxx. Special Topics in Economics (3 credits)


    The study of a particular topic of special importance, relevance, and currency in the field of economics. The content of the special topics course varies with each offering. Course may be repeated as long as topic being studied is different. PREREQ: ECN 2020 , ECN 2030 .

  
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    ECNS 5xxx. Special Topics (3 credits)


    The study of a particular topic of special importance, relevance, and currency to students in the Master of Business Administration program. The content of the special topics course varies with each offering and may be taken twice.


Education

  
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    EDN 104. College Reading (3 credits)


    This course is designed to foster effective and efficient reading. Vocabulary, comprehension, and strategies for reading college texts are addressed. (Will not count toward graduation requirements.) Open to all students.

  
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    EDN 2100. Introduction to Education (3 credits)


    This course provides students with knowledge of the philosophical, historical, sociological, legal, financial and structural foundations of education with opportunities to analyze contemporary issues, problems and trends in the field of education. Course activities and field assignments are designed to nurture the professional disposition for critical reflection. All teacher education majors will be required to enroll in and earn a grade of "C" or better. PREREQ: 30 semester hours and 2.5 GPA. Required for admission into the Teacher Education Program. Field experience is required

  
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    EDN 2310. Race, Culture, and the Lumbee Experience (3 credits)


    Crosslisted: (AIS 2310)
    This course will examine and explore the fundamental psychosocial elements that constitute race, prejudice, and discrimination using Lumbee ethnicity as the model for examination.

  
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    EDN 3020. Foundations of Education (3 credits)


    This course provides students with knowledge of the philosophical, historical, sociological, legal, financial, and structural foundations of education and with opportunities to analyze contemporary issues, problems, and trends in the field of education. As students develop their professional knowledge base, they begin to construct their own conceptual frameworks for teaching and learning. Course activities and field assignments are designed to nurture the professional disposition for critical reflection. A field experience is required. PREREQ: Must have completed at least 30 semester hours of college/university work and have no less than a 2.0 overall QPA.

  
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    EDN 3130. Content Area Reading (3 credits)


    This course is designed to help K‐12 students understand the roles of language and literacy in the teaching of various content areas. Focus will be given to disciplinary literacy using distinct instructional strategies that can assist 21st century adolescent students in understanding how reading and writing are used in a discipline, as well as how they will apply to this life outside of school. PREREQ: Admission to Teacher Education Program.

  
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    EDN 3140. Aspects of Human Development and Educational Psychology (Grades 6-12) (3 credits)


    An in‐depth study of the aspects of human development and educational psychology as they apply to students in Grades 6-12. The course is structured around the topics of physical, intellectual, emotional and social development from middle childhood through middle adolescence; and explores the influences of applied educational psychology pertaining to 6th- through 12th-grade students.

  
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    EDN 3150. Developmental Perspectives of Educational Psychology (Grades K‐12) (3 credits)


    An in‐depth study of the psychology of education and human development. Centered around the main topics of emotional, cognitive, physical, and social development of children and adolescents, this course explores the influences of education, psychology of learning, motivation and behavior. An emphasis in this course will be on how educational psychology can be applied at various stages of development.

  
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    EDN 3400. Philosophy and Curriculum of Middle Grade (3 credits)


    This course examines the contemporary Middle School, including historical antecedents, concepts, philosophy, trends, issues, instructional strategies, and models. Specific attention is focused on the middle school child, the middle school teacher, integrated and interdisciplinary instruction; standards based curriculum, and assessment. PREREQ: 30 semester hours and 2.5 GPA.

 

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