May 19, 2024  
The University of North Carolina at Pembroke 2017-2018 Catalog 
    
The University of North Carolina at Pembroke 2017-2018 Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Biology

  
  • BIO 4310. Biometrics (4 credits)


    This course covers the nature of the scientific method, hypothesis formulation, experimental protocols, and hypothesis testing. An emphasis is placed on the concepts of experimental design in biological systems, and on current methods of standard data analysis. During the semester, students will design a research project, collect data, analyze this data in an appropriate way, and write a research paper that conforms to standards of current biological journals. The course is recommended for students planning a research career in biology. Student understanding of basic statistics and familiarity with microcomputer data bases and word processing programs are assumed. Lecture. PREREQ: BIO 1000 .

  
  • BIO 4320. Conservation Biology (4 credits)


    The science of conserving the Earth’s biodiversity. This course will examine mankind’s impact on species, populations, and habitats. The role of government and the private sector in conservation will be discussed. Emphasis will be placed on defining the problems and identifying scientific solutions, based on ecological principles and case studies. Lecture and Laboratory. PREREQ: BIO 1000 , BIO 1010 , BIO 1020 .

  
  • BIO 4610. Animal Physiology (4 credits)


    Physiological principles study as they occur throughout the animal kingdom with special emphasis on mammals. A detailed study of the mechanisms involved in the maintenance of the homeostatic condition. Lecture and Laboratory. PREREQ: BIO 1000 , BIO 1020  required; CHM 2500 , CHM 2510 , and BIO 3710  recommended.

  
  • BIO 4700. Reading and Writing in the Natural Sciences (3 credits)


    This course will utilize science books, essays, and journal articles intended for various audiences to provide practice in reading and thinking critically about the connections among various disciplines of science. The skill of writing will be addressed as a process with a chance for multiple drafts and peer review. This course is intended for senior majors in the Natural Sciences.

  
  • BIO 4950. Biology Seminar (1 credit per semester)


    A seminar series in which current biology research projects are presented and discussed. Most seminars will be presented by visiting scientists recruited from research laboratories in industry and universities. Lecture. (repeatable up to 4 credits) PREREQ: BIO 1000 , Consent of Instructor.

  
  • BIO 4990. Research in Biology (1-3 credits per semester)


    Designed to provide the student with experience in the analysis and solution of problems in an areas of biological interest. Students should approach appropriate departmental faculty and discuss the possibility of collaboration on BIO 4990 hours prior to registration. Faculty approval is required for registration. (repeatable up to 12 credits) PREREQ: Consent of mentoring faculty member.

  
  • BIO 5100. Marine Biology (3 credits)


    A survey of the common organisms associated with tropical marine habitats. Emphasis will be on fish, invertebrates, algae, and birds. Coverage will include discussions of the coral reef and mangrove communities, ocean currents, and physical and geological factors. The course includes a one-week on-campus study followed by a one-week field, lab work at the Bermuda Biological Station for Research. There are additional costs involved in the trip.

  
  • BIO 5120. Topics in Ecology and Environmental Biology (3 credits)


    Students will become cognizant of the principles of ecology and environmental biology through analysis of the interactions of organisms with each other and their interactions with the physical environment. The impact of humans and human systems on the natural world will be examined The interaction of ecological, geological and human processes is examined at regional, national, and global scales. Human management of fragmented landscapes will be discussed. Certain topics may be emphasized according to the expertise of the instructor.

  
  • BIO 5140. Biogeography (3 credits)


    Students will become cognizant of the principles of biogeography through an analysis of the interactions of organisms with each other and with the physical environment through time. Biogeographic processes are examined at individual, community, and ecosystem levels. The effects of evolution and a changing earth on species distribution and extinction will be assessed. Causes of modern and historical distributions of taxa will be examined.

  
  • BIO 5150. Advanced Microbiology (3 credits)


    A survey of modern developments emphasizing the application of the knowledge of fundamental microbiology to address problems which exist in today’s environment. Topics will be discussed using case studies and problem -based learning and will include comparative genomics, emerging infectious diseases, antibiotic resistance, bioterrorism, microbial biotechnology and archaeal, viral, and prion biology.

  
  • BIO 5200. Current Trends in Molecular and Cellular Biology (3 credits)


    This course is designed to provide the student with an awareness and appreciation of the rapidly changing trends in molecular and cellular biology. Discussion will include the medical potential and ethical issues raised by developments in these areas. Topics of discussion will include cloning, gene therapy, etc.

  
  • BIO 5250. Evolutionary Botany (3 credits)


    A survey of all photosynthetic organisms with emphasis on phylogenetic relationships. Topics covered will include early evolution of life and the part photosynthesis played, three billion years of evolution restricted to the aquatic habitat, and evolution of terrestrial plants over the last half billion years.

  
  • BIO 5280. Teaching Practicum in Biology (3 credits)


    Experience in some aspects of the teaching of biology with formal evaluation, supervision, and direction determined by the supervisory professor and student. PREREQ: Permission of coordinating professor and graduate director of science education. Application must be approved in the semester preceding the one in which the practicum is to be undertaken.

  
  • BIO 5350. Evolutionary Zoology (3 credits)


    A review of the basic workings of science, evolutionary concepts, and the animal kingdom. Topics will also include animal fossils, morphological & behavioral phylogeny, and human evolution.

  
  • BIO 5400. Natural History of Costa Rica (3 credits)


    An introduction to different ecosystems within Costa Rica. Students participate in field trips and excursions to study first-hand the biological complexities of the tropics. Students will experience cultural aspects of Costa Rica, discuss Costa Rica’s conservation ethic and the impact of humans on the environment. Offered in the summer of odd-numbered years; students spend two full weeks in Costa Rica.

  
  • BIO 5550. Independent Biology Research (3 credits)


    Advanced students carry out independent research activity relating to a significant problem in a major field of study in biology based on their interests. Supervised by a faculty member. Formal report and preparation required. PREREQ: Permission of the supervising professor and the graduate director of science education. Application must be approved in the semester preceding the one in which the independent research is to take place.

  
  • BIO 5770. Science in the Natural Environment (3 credits)


    An overview of the study of the natural environment and environmental education methods for science professionals and science educators, including design of and participation in experiential learning programs that emphasize environmental and nature studies. The use of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) for the biological and environmental sciences is emphasized as students create maps, analyze spatial data, and create their own data from field observations. An emphasis is placed on wetland-related topics.


Biology Laboratory

  
  • BIOL 1000. Laboratory Investigations and Experiences in General Biology (1 credit)


    Introductory laboratory experiments in which basic principles of biology will be investigated. Laboratory. PREREQ: Enrollment in or credit for BIO 1000 .


Special Topics in Biology

  
  • BIOS 3xxx. Special Topics in Biology (1-4 credits)


    A course designed to meet the unusual needs of individuals in special programs such as the Science Institute for school teachers and those working toward licensure. The specific contents and credit for the course will be determined by the needs of the students and is subject to departmental approval. Lecture. PREREQ: BIO 1000 .

  
  • BIOS 5xxx. Special Topics in Biology (1-4 credits)


    The course content will vary from offering to offering. It will meet the special needs of individuals within the master’s program at UNCP and of students who seek credit by enrolling in special departmental offerings such as short courses, seminars, and special, intense summer experiences which focus on concepts within the discipline of biology. Offerings will be on an announced basis.


Business Law

  
  • BLAW 2150. Business Law and Ethics (3 credits)


    The legal environment of business, contracts, personal property, commercial transactions, and forms of business organization.

  
  • BLAW 3160. International Business Law (3 credits)


    This course will introduce students to the legal mechanics of international business transactions and to the commercial law environment within which those transactions are negotiated and executed. The course will focus on the trade and investment activities of business entities, examining in a practical way the legal documentation necessary to execute various types of transactions and issues that the international lawyer and business person are likely to confront. PREREQ: MGT 2150.

  
  • BLAW 3180. Commercial Law (3 credits)


    Study of the commercial legal environment in which business enterprises operate. Examines the law of contracts, sales and warranties, security interests, commercial paper, and debtor and creditor rights. PREREQ: BLAW 2150 .

  
  • BLAW 5280. Legal Issues for Managers (3 credits)


    The goal of this course is to help graduate students develop a deeper appreciation and understanding of the legal mechanics of various types of business transactions and of the commercial law environment within which those transactions are negotiated and executed. The course is designed to enhance the student’s analytical, communication, and negotiation skills while developing knowledge of several areas of law that play an integral part in management decisions.

  
  • BLAW 5320. Law for Entrepreneurs (3 credits)


    This course will help students develop a deeper appreciation and understanding of the legal issues faced in establishing, operating and maximizing a business. The course is designed to enhance the student’s analytical and communication skills while developing knowledge of the legal decisions made by entrepreneurs.


Special Topics in Business Law

  
  • BLWS 5xxx. Special Topics (3 credits)


    The study of a particular topic of special importance, relevance, and currency to students in the Master of Business Administration program. The content of the special topics course varies with each offering and may be taken twice.


Broadcasting

  
  • BRD 1600. Television Production (3 credits)


    Basic theory and practice of studio operations in television, with a laboratory experience in the use of microphones, cameras, switchers, and related equipment.

  
  • BRD 1610. Broadcast Practicum (1 credit)


    A vehicle for students to learn broadcasting or webcasting operations while participating in the department’s campus/community productions and earning progressively responsible positions in videography, reporting, directing, producing, audio, on-air presentation, etc. Pass/Fail grading.

  
  • BRD 1620. Broadcast Practicum (1 credit)


    A vehicle for students to learn broadcasting or webcasting operations while participating in the department’s campus/community productions and earning progressively responsible positions in videography, reporting, directing, producing, audio, on-air presentation, etc. Pass/Fail grading.

  
  • BRD 2600. Basic Videography and Editing (3 credits)


    This course provides a foundation in single-camera field production and editing in traditional or new media formats. Fundamental aesthetics, technology, and techniques for camera, lighting, sound, and editing will be emphasized, and students will be introduced to preproduction planning, including storyboards and scripts. PREREQ: C or better in BRD 1600 .

  
  • BRD 2610. Broadcast Practicum (1 credit)


    A vehicle for students to learn broadcasting or webcasting operations while participating in the department’s campus/community productions and earning progressively responsible positions in videography, reporting, directing, producing, audio, on-air presentation, etc. Pass/Fail grading.

  
  • BRD 2620. Broadcast Practicum (1 credit)


    A vehicle for students to learn broadcasting or webcasting operations while participating in the department’s campus/community productions and earning progressively responsible positions in videography, reporting, directing, producing, audio, on-air presentation, etc. Pass/Fail grading.

  
  • BRD 3130. Broadcast Advertising (3 credits)


    Theory and technique of writing persuasive commercial copy for audiovisual media. Emphasis on script formats, writing style, media buys, and other creative, practical solutions to problems in targeting and persuading audiences. PREREQ: MCM 2400 .

  
  • BRD 3140. Broadcast Journalism (3 credits)


    The theory and practice of broadcast news, to include covering local and national news and public affairs for radio and televisions. Emphasis will be on writing and reporting. PREREQ: MCM 2400 , C or better in BRD 2600 .

  
  • BRD 3150. Broadcast Programming and Management (3 credits)


    Fiscal and administrative responsibilities in broadcast operations, including contemporary strategies in TV and radio programming, audience measurement, sales, labor, and promotions. PREREQ: BRD 1600  and MCM 2100 .

  
  • BRD 3170. Screenwriting (3 credits)


    Students will develop skills in writing scripts for long and short form TV and film genres such as sitcoms, dramas, documentaries, and screenplays. Forms, styles, and conventions of writing for motion media will be explored.

  
  • BRD 3600. Advanced Videography and Editing (3 credits)


    Advanced instruction in the art and science of digital videography and postproduction, using professional- grade video cameras and nonlinear editing systems. Students will produce video projects and may participate in WNCP broadcast or webcast activities. PREREQ: C or better in BRD 2600 .

  
  • BRD 3610. Broadcast Practicum (1 credit)


    A vehicle for students to learn broadcasting or webcasting operations while participating in the department’s campus/community productions and earning progressively responsible positions in videography, reporting, directing, producing, audio, on-air presentation, etc. Pass/Fail grading.

  
  • BRD 3620. Broadcast Practicum (1 credit)


    A vehicle for students to learn broadcasting or webcasting operations while participating in the department’s campus/community productions and earning progressively responsible positions in videography, reporting, directing, producing, audio, on-air presentation, etc. Pass/Fail grading.

  
  • BRD 3700. Visual Effects and Post (3 credits)


    A hands-on approach to tackling complex problems in post-production and digital editing. Concepts such as rotoscoping, color-correction, animation, and special effects will be explored. PREREQ: C or better in BRD 2600 .

  
  • BRD 4200. Advanced Broadcast Journalism (3 credits)


    Emphasizes integration of television news and television studio production, plus localizing national and international news and reworking public relations material for TV newscasts. PREREQ: BRD 3140 .

  
  • BRD 4600. Advanced Television Production (3 credits)


    A capstone course that builds on concepts and skills from earlier coursework, including preproduction planning, scripting, videography, and postproduction. Students will work with studio or field techniques to manage complex productions and to produce an original TV series or long-form video. PREREQ: C or better in BRD 3600 .

  
  • BRD 4610. Broadcast Practicum (1 credit)


    A vehicle for students to learn broadcasting or webcasting operations while participating in the department’s campus/community productions and earning progressively responsible positions in videography, reporting, directing, producing, audio, on-air presentation, etc. Pass/Fail grading.

  
  • BRD 4620. Broadcast Practicum (1 credit)


    A vehicle for students to learn broadcasting or webcasting operations while participating in the department’s campus/community productions and earning progressively responsible positions in videography, reporting, directing, producing, audio, on-air presentation, etc. Pass/Fail grading.


Biotechnology

  
  • BTEC 3220. Biotechnology I (4 credits)


    A laboratory-oriented course with lecture and laboratory components. Its purpose is to familiarize students with DNA science techniques in biotechnology and with scientific write-up of laboratory reports and to encourage their interest in graduate research and careers in this area. The course is open to Biology and Chemistry majors and is especially recommended to students that want to gain laboratory experience and dexterity before taking other higher level required courses. Lecture and Laboratory. PREREQ: BIO 1000 , BIO 3180 .

  
  • BTEC 3230. Biotechnology II (4 credits)


    A laboratory-oriented course to familiarize students with more advanced techniques in biotechnology, molecular genetics, and cell biology. The lecture portion of the course will cover concepts on which the techniques are based along with current and future applications. Students will gain experience with tissue and cell cultures, will learn techniques not covered in other required biology courses, and will become familiar with scientific write-up of laboratory reports. Lecture and Laboratory. PREREQ: BTEC 3220 .

  
  • BTEC 3510. Bioprocessing (3 credits)


    A laboratory intensive course designed to train students in selected aspects of fermentation for the production of biochemicals and macromolecules. Students will learn theory and practical application for important techniques in projects related to fermentation and bioconversion. PREREQ: BIO 3150  or BIO 3710  and CHM 3110 .

  
  • BTEC 3610. Bioseparations Technology (3 credits)


    A laboratory intensive course designed to train students in selected aspects of the separation and downstream processing of biomolecules. The specific objectives include the application of: (1) product recovery methods, (2) product purification technology to biomanufacturing. The technologies will be explored in view of bench scale, pilot and commercial scale processes. PREREQ: CHM 2510 .

  
  • BTEC 4300. Principles of Medical Biotechnology (3 credits)


    A broad overview of methods, strategies, and applications used in medical biotechnology with emphasis on therapeutic concepts including discovery of target molecules, disease models, and testing of pharmaceutical agents. Will also cover analytical methods as applied to experimental design, drug safety, and the analysis of data. FDA drug regulation, product development, and patient procedures will also be covered. Lecture. PREREQ: BIO 1000  and CHM 1310 .

  
  • BTEC 4900. Internship/Co-op (3 credits)


    A course designed to give students first-hand experience working with a biotechnology host organization. Internships are arranged on an individual basis and must involve supervision by both the host organization’s staff and the Biotechnology Program Director or Coordinator. Three hours of academic credit will be awarded for a minimum of 320 contact hours (8 weeks at 40 hours per week) of work with the host organization. Pass/Fail grading. PREREQ: Consent of the Biotechnology Program Director or Coordinator.

  
  • BTEC 5300. Principles of Medical Biotechnology (3 credits)


    The purpose of this course is to provide a broad overview of the methods and strategies of biotechnology for medicinal applications including drug discovery. Major emphasis will be placed on describing therapeutic concepts and how they are developed from the discovery of a molecular target for drugs to the use of disease models to test new pharmaceutical agents. The course covers many aspects of biotechnology, including aspects of molecular pharmacology, gene therapy, and drug safety evaluation. This course also introduces analytical methods as applied to experimental design and quantitative analysis of data encountered in biotechnology and biomedical sciences. Graduate students will also take part in assembling specific components of a manuscript in the drug discovery field. PREREQ: BIO 1000 , CHM 1300 , and graduate status.


Special Topics in Biotechnology

  
  • BTES 4xxx. Special Topics in Biotechnology (3 credits)


    A course designed to offer special and advanced topics in Biotechnology. PREREQ: Consent of the instructor. Title and topic will vary from year to year


Business

  
  • BUS 1001. Passport for Professional Success-Awareness 1 (0 credits)


    The Passport for Professional Success Program Awareness 1 cluster requires students to attend an Introduction to the Passport Program, attend a Study Abroad information session, and attend a Student Involvement and Leadership Session. This course will be graded on a Complete/Incomplete basis.

  
  • BUS 1002. Passport for Professional Success-Awareness 2 (0 credits)


    The Passport for Professional Success Awareness 2 cluster requires students to participate in engagement activities with School of Business Faculty and / or Alumni and attend a Student Internship Information Session. This course will be graded on a Complete/Incomplete basis.

  
  • BUS 1003. Passport for Professional Success-Fundamentals 1 (0 credits)


    The Passport for Professional Success Program Fundamentals 1 cluster requires students to attend a Career Center Resume Workshop and attend at least two sessions at the Professional and Career Development Institute (PCDI). This course will be graded on a Complete/Incomplete basis.

  
  • BUS 1004. Passport for Professional Success-Transition (0 credits)


    The Passport for Professional Success Program Transition cluster requires students to attend a Career Expo (or Fair), complete a Career Center mock interview, and complete a Senior Exit Interview. This course will be graded on a Complete/Incomplete basis.

  
  • BUS 1005. Passport for Professional Success-Extended Engagement (0 credits)


    Passport for Professional Success Extended Engagement activities are long-term in nature and revolve around a core area engaging utilization of student skills in an extended activity of the School of Business. Each student must complete one of the following engagement activities: (1) participate in an approved student organization, (2) participate in an approved study abroad experience, (3) participate in approved civic and community activities, or (4) participate in and complete an approved internship. This course will be graded on a Complete/Incomplete basis.

  
  • BUS 1006. Passport for Professional Success-Fundamentals 2 (0 credits)


    The Passport for Professional Success Fundamentals 2 cluster requires students to complete a series of verbal presentations requiring professional attire and to attend the following: University-sponsored formal dinners, professional networking events, School of Business-approved seminars, special speaker presentations, or other approved presentations. This course will be graded on a Complete/Incomplete basis.

  
  • BUS 2000. Introduction to Business (3 credits)


    This course introduces the student to the terminology and concepts used in the world of business through a comprehensive approach designed around the functional areas of business administration. The course will focuses on how the business entity interacts with its employees (management), customers (economics and marketing), and lenders and creditors (accounting and finance). An emphasis is placed on understanding the global business environment (international business). Topics include the components and actions needed to start a business (entrepreneurship), the skills needed to manage the firm, how products and services of the business are effectively priced and marketed, sources of funds to start and grow the company, and the accounting tools that are used to track income and expenses. Business ethics and social responsibility will be emphasized, as well the use of technology within each of the functional areas mentioned above, and effective business communication skills.


Chemistry

  
  • CHM 1100. General Chemistry Laboratory I (1 credit)


    Laboratory exercises correlated with topics of Chemistry 1300. PREREQ: Enrollment in or completion of CHM 1300 .

  
  • CHM 1110. General Chemistry Laboratory II (1 credit)


    Laboratory exercises correlated with topics of Chemistry 1310. PREREQ: CHM 1100  and enrollment in or completion of CHM 1310 .

  
  • CHM 1120. Chemistry for Health Sciences Laboratory I (1 credit)


    Laboratory exercises correlated with topics of Chemistry 1400. PREREQ: Enrollment in or completion of CHM 1400 .

  
  • CHM 1130. Chemistry for Health Sciences Laboratory II (1 credit)


    Laboratory exercises correlated with topics of Chemistry 1410. PREREQ: CHM 1120  and enrollment in or completion of CHM 1410 .

  
  • CHM 1300. General Chemistry I (3 credits)


    Composition, structure, and properties of matter, including stoichiometry, atomic and molecular structure and theory, chemical periodicity, thermochemistry, and gases. PREREQ: Completion of or enrollment in MAT 1070 , 1080, 1090, 1180, 2100, 2110, 2150, 2210, 2220, or 2300.

  
  • CHM 1310. General Chemistry II (3 credits)


    Chemical reactivity, including properties of solutions, kinetics and equilibrium, acids and bases, and electrochemistry. Basic chemical principles applied to organic, inorganic, and nuclear systems. PREREQ: C- or better in Chemistry CHM 1300 .

  
  • CHM 1400. Chemistry for Health Sciences I (3 credits)


    A broad survey of general chemistry topics relevant to the allied health fields, including composition, structure and properties of matter, equilibrium, and acids and bases. This course is intended for students interested in allied health specializations and may not serve as a prerequisite for upper level chemistry courses.

  
  • CHM 1410. Chemistry for Health Sciences II (3 credits)


    A broad survey of organic and biochemical topics relevant to the allied health fields, including compound classes, major reactions, and metabolism. This course is intended for students interested in allied health specializations and may not serve as prerequisite for upper level chemistry courses. PREREQ: CHM 1400 .

  
  • CHM 1990. Introduction to Research in Chemistry (1 credit)


    Intended for a student’s first research experience, this course involves close faculty supervision and guidance on literature and laboratory work directed towards a common research objective. A detailed laboratory notebook will be maintained and submitted to the supervising faculty member at the conclusion of the course. Pass/Fail grading. PREREQ: Consent of Department Chair.

  
  • CHM 2260. Elementary Inorganic Chemistry (4 credits)


    Fundamental principles of inorganic chemistry, including coordination and nuclear chemistry, will be examined through a study of the descriptive chemistry of metallic and nonmetallic elements. Laboratories will involve the preparation and characterization of technologically important chemical substances. PREREQ: CHM 1310 , CHM 1110 .

  
  • CHM 2270. Analytical Chemistry (4 credits)


    The principles and techniques of classical and simple instrumental methods of chemical analysis will be examined with an emphasis on quality assurance and method validation concepts. Laboratories will involve the use of these analytical techniques in the determination of substances in a variety of sample matrices. PREREQ: CHM 1310 , CHM 1110 .

  
  • CHM 2300. Basic Environmental Chemistry (4 credits)


    A study of chemical processes of the earth’s lithosphere, hydrosphere and atmosphere, emphasizing environmental issues associated with human activity. Laboratory projects will include the collection, processing, and analysis of soil, water, and air samples. PREREQ: CHM 1310 , CHM 1110 .

  
  • CHM 2500. Organic Chemistry I (4 credits)


    The aliphatic and aromatic carbon compounds with special emphasis on structure, major reactions, and reaction mechanisms. A laboratory is included. PREREQ: CHM 1310 , CHM 1110 .

  
  • CHM 2510. Organic Chemistry II (4 credits)


    A continuation of CHM 2500 . A laboratory is included. PREREQ: CHM 2500 .

  
  • CHM 3110. Biochemistry (3 credits)


    A study of the chemical constitution of living matter and the biochemical build‑up and breakdown of molecules in living organisms. PREREQ: One semester of Organic Chemistry.

  
  • CHM 3120. Experimental Methods in Biochemistry (1 credit)


    A student laboratory that deals with the experimental methods used in biochemistry. PREREQ: Enrollment in, or completion of, CHM 3110 .

  
  • CHM 3210. Biochemistry II (3 credits)


    A continuation and more thorough treatment of biochemical principles considered in CHM 3110 . Topics include (1) enzyme mechanisms (2) bioenergetics and metabolism (3) biological membranes (4) regulation of gene expression. PREREQ: CHM 3110 .

  
  • CHM 3240. DNA Analysis Laboratory (1 credit)


    A student laboratory involving experiments focused on the isolation, manipulation, and analysis of DNA from various sources. PREREQ: Enrollment in, or completion of, CHM 3210 .

  
  • CHM 3520. Organic Chemistry III (3 credits)


    A study of organic chemistry emphasizing the major spectroscopic methods, including NMR, IR, UV/Visible, and mass spectrometry, and how data from these sources are used to determine the molecular structure of organic compounds. Laboratory projects are included. PREREQ: Consent of instructor and concurrent registration in either CHM 3990  or CHM 4990  for 1-3 semester hours.

  
  • CHM 3980. Scientific Literature (2 credits)


    Introduction to methodology of researching topics in the chemical literature and to the writing conventions used in the chemical literature. PREREQ: CHM 2500 .

  
  • CHM 3990. Research in Chemistry (1-3 credits)


    This course involves student research on projects supervised by departmental faculty. Both laboratory and literature research are typically included, and a detailed lab notebook and formal report of results will be submitted to the supervising faculty member at the conclusion of the course. Pass/Fail grading. (repeatable for up to 6 credits) PREREQ: Completion of or enrollment in at least one 2000-level chemistry lab course and consent of Department Chair.

  
  • CHM 4100. Physical Chemistry I (4 credits)


    A theoretical and mathematical treatment of the fundamental laws and theories underlying the science of chemistry. Included is a student laboratory that deals with experimental methods used in physical chemistry. PREREQ: MAT 2210  and MAT 2220 , either PHY 1500  or PHY 2000 , and at least 16 hours of CHM coursework at or above the 2000 level and CHM 3980 .

  
  • CHM 4110. Physical Chemistry II (4 credits)


    A continuation of CHM 4100 . Included is a student laboratory that deals with experimental methods used in physical chemistry. PREREQ: CHM 4100 .

  
  • CHM 4200. Forensic Chemistry (4 credits)


    An examination of chemical theories and practices related to the analysis of physical evidence in criminal investigations. Included laboratory work will emphasize the use of analytical instrumentation commonly encountered in modern crime labs. PREREQ: CHM 2270  and CHM 3110 .

  
  • CHM 4260. Advanced Inorganic Chemistry (4 credits)


    The bonding, structure, and reactions of inorganic substances will be explored through applications of appropriate physico‑chemical theories. Laboratory projects are included which employ a variety of instrumental methods to examine thermodynamic and kinetic properties of inorganic systems. PREREQ: CHM 2260 , CHM 4100 .

  
  • CHM 4270. Instrumental Analysis (4 credits)


    Advanced topics related to instrumental methods of chemical analysis will be examined. Laboratory projects will focus on the finer points of data acquisition, analysis, and evaluation. PREREQ: CHM 2270 , CHM 4100 ; PHY 1510 /PHY 1570  or PHY 2010 /PHY 2070 .

  
  • CHM 4800. Internship in Chemistry (1-4 credits)


    Experiential learning through work with an external agency. Internships are arranged on an individual basis and must involve chemistry-related work and supervision by both the agency’s staff and a University faculty member. An internship application must be approved by the Department Chair prior to registration. Academic credit will be awarded at a maximum rate of 1 semester hour for each 40 clock hours of work with the agency. Pass/Fail grading. PREREQ: 24 semester hours of CHM course work and consent of the Department Chair.

  
  • CHM 4990. Independent Study in Chemistry (1-3 credits)


    Individual study in advanced areas of chemistry. Offered for chemistry majors only. PREREQ: Consent of Department Chair.

  
  • CHM 5200. Current Trends in Chemistry (3 credits)


    A survey of current developments and trends in the various fields of chemistry. PREREQ: At least 24 credit hours of undergraduate coursework in chemistry or consent of the instructor and the department chair.

  
  • CHM 5200. Current Trends in Chemistry (3 credits)


    A survey of current developments and trends in the various fields of chemistry. PREREQ: At least 24 credit hours of undergraduate coursework in chemistry or consent of the instructor and the department chair.

  
  • CHM 5420. Environmental Chemistry: Water Chemistry (3 credits)


    A study of water in our environment and our daily lives focusing on human interactions with water. Field trips allow first-hand experience with some of the issues covered. PREREQ: General Chemistry (CHM 1300  or equivalent); one semester of Organic Chemistry and General Biology recommended.

  
  • CHM 5480. Historical Perspectives of Chemistry (3 credits)


    This course emphasizes the development of physical concepts in the discipline of chemistry from the earliest records through Aristotle, the alchemist and beyond, to the present. Topics include contributions of such scientists as Boyle, Lavoisier, Dalton, Mendeleev, Rutherford, and others. Discussions concerning their methods, motives, and the mental and social climate of their time are also included.

  
  • CHM 5500. Spectroscopic Methods of Structure Determination (3 credits)


    The student will be introduced to the process by which the modern organic chemist determines the atom-to-atom structure of organic molecules. A review of empirical and molecular formulas, and what can be learned from them, is included. However, the major focus of the course will be teaching the student about the use of a number of instrumental techniques that is used in the elucidation of individual molecular structures. The specific techniques, and how they relate to molecular structure determination, include: UV-VIS (ultra violet-visible spectroscopy), IR (infrared spectroscopy), mass spectrometry (simulated data only), and various introductory and advanced NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy) techniques, including Proton and Carbon-13, COSY, DEPT, and HETCOR. PREREQ: At least 24 credit hours of undergraduate coursework in chemistry or consent of the instructor and the department chair.

  
  • CHM 5600. Instruments for Chemical Analysis (3 credits)


    A course examining the theory and operation of instrumentation used for quantitative and qualitative analyses of matter. A combination of lecture and laboratory activities will develop both student knowledge of and skills in a variety of modern spectroscopic, electrochemical and chromatographic techniques. PREREQ: At least 24 credit hours of undergraduate coursework in chemistry or consent of the instructor and the department chair.


Special Topics in Chemistry

  
  • CHMS 5xxx. Special Topics in Chemistry (3 credits)


    Course content will focus on topics in chemistry and will vary from offering to offering, with prerequisites appropriate to content. It will meet the special needs of individuals within the master’s program at UNCP and of students who seek credit by enrolling in special departmental offerings such as short courses, seminars, and special, intense summer experiences which focus on concepts within the discipline of chemistry.

  
  • CHMS 44xx.. Special Topics in Chemistry (1-3 credits)


    Advanced class study in selected areas of chemistry. PREREQ: Consent of the Instructor.

  
  • CHMS 49xx.. Seminar (1 credit)


    A seminar series in which current research projects are presented and discussed. Most seminars will be presented by visiting scientists recruited from research laboratories in industry and universities. (repeatable up to 4 credits) PREREQ: Consent of instructor.


Counseling

  
  • CNS 5000. Professional and Ethical Issues in Counseling (3 credits)


    This course is an introduction to the profession of counseling and includes a study of the history, philosophy, ethical and legal considerations, and professional organizations related to the delivery of counseling, consultation, and advocacy. Students will learn about the ethics, credentialing practices and standards of the counseling profession, the suggested disposition and self-care practices of counselors, and the administrative procedures of counseling, consulting, and referral services in multiple settings. Students will also receive an introduction to the supervision processes and practices in the role of the professional development of counselors. PREREQ: Admission to the Clinical Mental Health Counseling program or the Professional School Counseling program.

  
  • CNS 5025. Lifespan Development (3 credits)


    This course is designed to help counselors address the needs of clients at all developmental levels in multicultural contexts. The course focus emphasizes strategies for facilitating optimal development. Theories and models of growth and learning, personality development, wellness, and resilience for individuals and families are presented. The course addresses contextual factors that influence normal and abnormal behavior. Students are encouraged to apply the theories and models of development in intervention selection and conceptualization of problems in living. PREREQ: Admission to the Clinical Mental Health Counseling program or the Professional School Counseling program.

  
  • CNS 5050. Counseling Skills and Techniques (3 credits)


    Students will learn counseling skills and techniques through classroom instruction and experiential activities. Counselor characteristics and behaviors that influence the counseling process will be addressed. This course focuses on the use of empathic listening and interviewing skills in developing therapeutic relationships with diverse clients in a multicultural society. The course also includes an orientation to wellness and prevention in the counseling process. PREREQ: Admission to the Clinical Mental Health Counseling program or the Professional School Counseling program.

  
  • CNS 5060. Crisis Intervention (3 credits)


    This course will explore the role, function, and responsibilities of professional counselors in periods of crisis and disaster. Crisis intervention theory will be studied in an effort to inform professional practice in clinical and educational settings during emergencies and disasters. The effects of crises, disasters, and other trauma-causing events will be addressed. Suicide prevention and intervention models, including the use of psychological first aid strategies are included in the course content. Ethical and cultural considerations in the delivery of crisis services will be examined. PREREQ: Completion of all core counseling courses or permission of the instructor.

 

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