May 25, 2024  
The University of North Carolina at Pembroke 2019-2020 Catalog 
    
The University of North Carolina at Pembroke 2019-2020 Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Economics

  
  • ECN 3070. Internet Economics (3 credits)


    Applying basic principles of economics, this course surveys the various ways that economics is applied to the area of electronic commerce and how the e-commerce revolution affects the economy. The course covers relevant applications of electronic commerce to emerging economic concepts such as virtual products, network industries, online pricing and advertising, vertical integration/vertical restraint in the online market, Internet intellectual property rights, anti-trust issues in e-commerce, online financial markets, online banking, digital cash and electronic payments, regulatory issues of online markets, the public sector and the online marketplace, Internet and security. It provides balanced examinations of how basic economic principles apply to the electronic marketplace and of how features of certain products sold in this market place required rethinking some of those principles. PREREQ: ECN 2020 .

  
  • ECN 3080. Environmental Economics (3 credits)


    This course examines the implications of economic theory and how it relates to the environment and environmental activity. The continuing conflict between market forces and environmental integrity will be the centerpiece of discussion, and the course will explain how economic theory views the relationship between economic activity and the natural world. Special emphasis is given to developing and implementing tools to evaluate environmental policies. Other topics include cost-benefit analysis, measurement of the benefits of non-market goods and costs of regulations, and the evaluation of the impact of regulations in areas such as financial markets, workplace health and safety, consumer product safety, and other contexts. PREREQ: ECN 2020 .

  
  • ECN 3090. Economics of Sports (3 credits)


    This course centers around the application of microeconomic theory to the sports industry, both at the professional and amateur sports markets. The topics include market structure, labor relations, labor market discrimination, competitive balance, market value of sports talent, and payments to players. The involvement of the government in the sports business will also be discussed. PREREQ: ECN 1000 or ECN 2020

  
  • ECN 3200. Mathematical Economics (3 credits)


    This course combines two strongly related disciplines, economics and mathematics, and provides the foundations needed for students to excel in future coursework in these disciplines. Multivariable calculus and linear algebra will be taught and applied to the problems of modeling, constrained optimization, and economic dynamics. PREREQ: C or better in MAT 2150 or 2210.

  
  • ECN 3300. Public Finance (3 credits)


    A descriptive and analytical study of government revenues and government expenditures. Includes federal, state, and local levels of government. PREREQ: ECN 2020 or ECN 2030

  
  • ECN 3410. U. S. Economic History (3 credits)


    Crosslisted: Department of History
    A study of the United States economy from colonization to the present.

  
  • ECN 3500. Survey of Ethics in Economics and Finance (3 credits)


    Crosslisted: (FIN 3500)
    A survey of the emerging field of Financial Ethics. This course will provide an overview of ethical theory and decision making, explore some of the possible sources of ethical conflicts in economics and finance, study the practice of ethical decision making in the fields of finance and economics, and employ case studies to practice methods for determining ethical decision making in financial management, investments, and financial institutions.

  
  • ECN 3600. Introduction to Econometrics (3 credits)


    This is a basic course in econometrics. Students will acquire the necessary quantitative skills to conduct applied analyses. Topics will include hypothesis testing, multiple regression, regression diagnostics, time-series analysis and forecasting, and the interpretation of regression results. Students will be taught to use econometrics software. PREREQ: C or better in MAT 2150 or in MAT 2210, and C or better in DSC 3180 or in MAT 2100.

  
  • ECN 3740. Health Economics (3 credits)


    This course will present an economic analysis of several aspects of the healthcare industry, including hospital services, physicians’ services, nurses’ services, the pharmaceutical industry, medical insurance, Medicare and Medicaid, HMOs and PPOs, medical tourism, and government healthcare policy. PREREQ: ECN 1000 or ECN 2020

  
  • ECN 4020. Industrial Organization (3 credits)


    Industrial organization is the study of industry and firm behavior. Using the basic tools of microeconomic theory and game theory, this course explores the relationships among firms in an industry or across industries by examining the nature of strategic interaction among firms. We will study theoretical models and empirical evidence for a wide variety of market phenomena. We will also introduce contract theory and its application in financial structure. PREREQ: C or better in ECN 2020  and MAT 2150  or MAT 2210 .

  
  • ECN 4060. Comparative Economic Systems (3 credits)


    A comparative study of alternative economic systems, including communism, socialism, and capitalism. PREREQ: ECN 2020 , ECN 2030 .

  
  • ECN 4070. Labor Economics (3 credits)


    Examines the nature of the labor markets and problems dealing with labor groups. Topics include history of the labor movement, union structure, labor law, collective bargaining. PREREQ: ECN 2020 .

  
  • ECN 4080. Development Economics (3 credits)


    Analysis of economic and social problems of underdeveloped regions. Theories and strategies of economic growth and development designed to accelerate solutions to these problems. PREREQ: ECN 2020 or ECN 2030.

  
  • ECN 4110. Development of Economic Thought (3 credits)


    A basic course in the development of economic theories and doctrines, from the ancient Greeks to the present day. PREREQ: ECN 2020 , ECN 2030 .

  
  • ECN 4400. International Trade (3 credits)


    An introductory analysis of international trade relations, the nature of a country’s imports and exports, costs and benefits of trade protectionism, the role of trade in the domestic economy, balance of payments, and the determination of exchange rates. PREREQ: ECN 2020 , ECN 2030 .

  
  • ECN 4800. Economics Internship (3 credits)


    This course entails a work experience in a business firm, a non-profit organization, or a government entity where the student, under academic and employer supervision, participates in the daily operations of the organization and conducts some economic analysis of the operations of the business entity (40 work hours per semester credit hour). Students must keep an extensive diary of work experiences and submit frequent reports to an academic supervisor, who is a UNCP faculty member in the Department of Economics, Finance, and Decision Sciences, who has been approved by the Chair of that department, and who will be responsible for assigning the grade in the course. Pass/Fail. PREREQ: Minimum of 90 semester hours, grades of C or better in ECN 2020  and in ECN 3010 , cumulative GPA of 2.5 or better, a declared academic major in Business Administration or Accounting, a written proposal, and written consent of Department Chair.

  
  • ECN 4990. Directed Studies in Economics (1-3 credits)


    Independent study in an area of economics of particular interest to a student under the direction of one or more faculty members. Students must submit detailed proposals for a directed study, detailing the proposed plan of study, research involved, dates for deliverables, final product to be produced and faculty who will be supervising. Proposals will be reviewed by a faculty committee to determine acceptance of the proposal. PREREQ: ECN 2020 , ECN 2030 , and permission of the Department.

  
  • ECN 5030. Foundations of Microeconomics/Macroeconomics (3 credits)


    This course is an accelerated course designed for students with no economics background or as a refresher course for students who desire to review economic principles before enrolling in required MBA courses. A study of the individual decisions in the market economy and an overall view of the operation of the economy. Specific topics include theories of consumer behavior, behavior of firms in various degrees of competition, and government regulation. Fiscal, monetary, and supply-side policies are discussed. (This course will not count toward the 36 hours required for the MBA degree.)

  
  • ECN 5100. Economics of Information (1 credit)


    This course provides an introduction to informational problems in economic analysis. It introduces basic economic models under asymmetric information and studies the effects of digitization and technology on industry, organizational structure, and business strategy. The course covers topics including the pricing of information goods, open source and innovation, search and competition, targeted advertising, information analytics, social networks, and a variety of other topics. Economic principles are illustrated using case studies and team projects.

  
  • ECN 5150. Managerial Economics (3 credits)


    An overview of methods of economic analysis applied to the modern United States economy. Emphasis on microeconomics and managerial economics such as theory of consumer choice and demand, theory of cost, outputs, and industrial structure, analysis of efficient use of resources within an organization. Also, macroeconomic analyses including a review of monetary institutions, and theory of GNP, inflation, and the rate of unemployment.

  
  • ECN 5420. Industry Structure and Competitive Strategy (3 credits)


    Industry structure and competitive strategy is the study of industry and firm behavior. Using the basic tools of microeconomic theory and game theory, this course explores the relationships among firms in an industry or across industries by examining the nature of strategic interaction among firms. The student will learn theoretical models and empirical evidence for a wide variety of market phenomena. The course will also introduce contract theory and its application in financial structure. PREREQ: A “C” or better in ECN 5030 or equivalent, and a “C” or better in DSC 5010 or equivalent.

  
  • ECN 5450. Global Macroeconomics (3 credits)


    This course builds upon students’ undergraduate knowledge of macroeconomics and international economics. Topics covered include domestic monetary policy, exchanges rates, balance of payments, and balance of trade. PREREQ: A “C” or better in ECN 5030 or equivalent, and a “C” or better in DSC 5010 or equivalent.

  
  • ECN 5740. Health Economics (3 credits)


    This course applies the analytical tools of economics to the markets for health care services, health insurance, and pharmaceuticals.  Some of the issues investigated in this course are the structure of these markets and the degree of competition among health care providers, health insurance and access to health care, and the role of the government in health care markets. PREREQ: ECN 5030 or equivalent

  
  • ECN 5990. Directed Studies (3 credits)


    Independent study in an area of business administration of particular interest to a student under the direction of one or more faculty members. Students must submit detailed proposals for a directed study, detailing the proposed plan of study, research involved, dates for deliverables, final product to be produced and faculty who will be supervising. Proposals will be reviewed by a faculty committee to determine acceptance of the proposal.


Special Topics in Economics

  
  • ECNS 4xxx. Special Topics in Economics (3 credits)


    The study of a particular topic of special importance, relevance, and currency in the field of economics. The content of the special topics course varies with each offering. Course may be repeated as long as topic being studied is different. PREREQ: ECN 2020 , ECN 2030 .

  
  • ECNS 5xxx. Special Topics (3 credits)


    The study of a particular topic of special importance, relevance, and currency to students in the Master of Business Administration program. The content of the special topics course varies with each offering and may be taken twice.


Education

  
  • EDN 2040. Field Experience (0 credit)


    The student will participate in field experiences that support the practical application of theoretical constructs including activities completed outside of the college classroom connecting to course content, assignments and assessments. Students will actively engage with clinical teachers and students to broaden their knowledge bases and engage in school-based professional activities and may include observation, co-teaching and working with students in supervised settings. (Course may be repeated.)  

  
  • EDN 2100. Introduction to Education (3 credits)


    This course provides students with knowledge of the philosophical, historical, sociological, legal, financial and structural foundations of education with opportunities to analyze contemporary issues, problems and trends in the field of education. Course activities and field assignments develop professional dispositions for educators designed to nurture the professional teaching disposition for critical reflection relating to teaching.  Successful completion of this course requires field experience assignments and a course grade of B- or better. Required for admission into the Teacher Education Program.  Field experience required.  PREREQ: 30 semester hours and a 2.7 GPA

  
  • EDN 2310. Race, Culture, and the Lumbee Experience (3 credits)


    Crosslisted: (AIS 2310)
    This course will examine and explore the fundamental psychosocial elements that constitute race, prejudice, and discrimination using Lumbee ethnicity as the model for examination.

  
  • EDN 3130. Content Area Reading (3 credits)


    This course is designed to help K‐12 students understand the roles of language and literacy in the teaching of various content areas. Focus will be given to disciplinary literacy using distinct instructional strategies that can assist 21st century adolescent students in understanding how reading and writing are used in a discipline, as well as how they will apply to this life outside of school.  Field experience required. PREREQ: Admission to Teacher Education Program.

  
  • EDN 3140. Aspects of Human Development and Educational Psychology (Grades 6-12) (3 credits)


    An in‐depth study of the aspects of human development and educational psychology as they apply to students in Grades 6-12. The course is structured around the topics of physical, intellectual, emotional and social development from middle childhood through middle adolescence; and explores the influences of applied educational psychology pertaining to 6th- through 12th-grade students. PREREQ: 2.7 GPA

  
  • EDN 3150. Developmental Perspectives of Educational Psychology (Grades K‐12) (3 credits)


    An in‐depth study of the psychology of education and human development. Centered around the main topics of emotional, cognitive, physical, and social development of children and adolescents, this course explores the influences of education, psychology of learning, motivation and behavior. An emphasis in this course will be on how educational psychology can be applied at various stages of development. PREREQ: 2.7 GPA

  
  • EDN 3400. Philosophy and Curriculum of Middle Grade (3 credits)


    This course examines the contemporary Middle School, including historical antecedents, concepts, philosophy, trends, issues, instructional strategies, and models. Specific attention is focused on the middle school child, the middle school teacher, integrated and interdisciplinary instruction; standards based curriculum, and assessment.  Field experience required. PREREQ: 30 semester hours and 2.7 GPA

  
  • EDN 3900. Research and Writing in Education (3 credits)


    This course is an introduction to writing in education, with an emphasis on formulation and execution of researchable topics within various content area disciplines of education. The course is designed to help students master competencies related to in-depth research, content knowledge, communication and composition including the use of current technologies. PREREQ: ENG 1050  and ENG 1060 ; Admission to Teacher Education Program.

  
  • EDN 4020. Non-Licensure Internship (3 credits)


    A supervised and evaluated practicum experience in an educational setting, e.g., non-profit agency or public entity, supervised by an on‑site supervisor and a UNCP faculty member. Students will actively reflect and use their experiences in writing assignments. Majors must have at least a 2.0 QPA within the major to be eligible for the internship. PREREQ: 2.0 GPA

  
  • EDN 4490. Internship (Full Semester) (9 credits)


    Provides continuous full-time, full-semester teaching experience in off-campus public school settings in the subject area in which the candidate seeks licensure.  Pass/Fail grading. PREREQ: Admission to the Professional Semester.

  
  • EDN 5040. Basics Tenets of Education (3 credits)


    This course is a graduate-level introduction to the foundational fields of education: philosophy and psychology, with an emphasis on the development of an appreciation for the role and responsibility of the teacher as the instructional leader in the educational community. 

    COREQ: EDN 5460 Field Experience required COREQ: EDN 5460

  
  • EDN 5120. Advanced Studies of Exceptional Children (3 credits)


    This course is a graduate-level introduction to the areas of focus addressed within the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act. This course familiarizes students with the practices, philosophies, roles, and responsibilities of educators working with a diverse population of students. Field experience required. COREQ: EDN 5460

  
  • EDN 5260. Advanced Instructional Approaches to Middle School Grades (3 credits)


    This course addresses the unique teaching strategies and specialized materials and resources for the middle grades classroom. Focus on specialized curriculum, and teaching styles which meet these needs, especially interdisciplinary team teaching. Field experience required. COREQ: EDN 5460

  
  • EDN 5450. Introduction to Curriculum Design and Best Practices (3 credits)


    This course examines curriculum design and research-based practices in lesson design and instructional practices, including backward design, instructional strategies such as differentiated instruction and formative and summative assessment.  COREQ:EDN 5460 Field experience reqiured.

  
  • EDN 5460. Field Experience (0 credit)


    The student will participate in field experiences that support the practical application of theoretical constructs including activities completed outside of the college classroom connecting to course content, assignments and assessments. Students will actively engage with clinical teachers and students to broaden their knowledge bases and engage in school-based professional activities and may include observation, co-teaching and working with students in supervised settings. (Course may be repeated.) 

  
  • EDN 5470. Advanced Classroom Management (3 credits)


    This course is designed to develop graduate students’ knowledge base related to the theory and techniques of classroom management. Emphasis is placed on how those understandings can be utilized to establish a positive and respectful learning environment for all students. A variety of classroom management programs are examined and evaluated. Field experience required. COREQ: EDN 5460

  
  • EDN 5480. Advanced Foundations of American Education (3 credits)


    This course focuses on the multicultural 21st-century classroom and its foundations in educational philosophy and educational psychology. Course requirements are designed to nurture the professional disposition for critical self-reflection and to develop the theoretical knowledge base including research-based practices in the classroom. Emphasis is placed on promoting positive learning outcomes for all students. Field experience required. COREQ: EDN 5460

  
  • EDN 5490. Effective Educational Leadership (3 credits)


    This course is designed to nurture and develop practitioners as leaders in their classrooms, in their schools, in their professions, in their communities, and in the broader society. The primary focus is on teachers as leaders in the teaching-learning process. Graduate candidates will begin and may finish their leadership projects in this course. Field experience required. COREQ: EDN 5460

  
  • EDN 5620. Advanced Educational Assessment (3 credits)


    This course is designed to address principles, theories, and techniques of educational measurement and classroom assessment. Topics addressed in this course are assessment techniques; interpreting test results; political, philosophical, and ethical issues in testing and assessment; and applications to classroom, district, and state testing programs.

  
  • EDN 5660. Applied Educational Research (3 credits)


    Emphasis is on understanding research designs and methods in education including an introduction to elementary statistics, interpreting and critiquing professional research literature, using research findings to validate and modify decisions about teaching and learning, and conducting action research in the classroom, school, and community. Graduate candidates will begin and may finish the research project in this course. Field experience required. COREQ: EDN 5460

  
  • EDN 5800. Effective Instructional Practices (3 credits)


    This course explores the development of effective instructional practices designed to significantly improve the academic success of all students. Topics covered in the class include (but are not limited to): responsiveness to students’ needs, reading and writing in the content areas, lesson planning, instructional expectations, technology integration, classroom management, higher-order thinking skills, and diversity. Field experience required.

  
  • EDN 5810. Internship (3 credits)


    Culminating clinical practice for initial teacher licensure. Course requirements include completion of program and licensure requirements, including full-time pre-service student internship or in-service teaching in a public-school setting in the licensure area.

  
  • EDN 5820. Instructional Development (3 credits)


    This course provides students with the knowledge and skills required for designing and evaluating instructional plans, units, and educational programs. Topics will include types of learning, learning hierarchies, task analysis, educational goal and objective formulation, assessing learner entry skills, and evaluation. The course will include a variety of activities with a strong emphasis on group problem solving and individual projects. Field experience required.

  
  • EDN 5990. Independent Study (3 credits)


    An independent study of the problems and issues of education relevant to the student’s major study areas or areas of concentration carried out by the student at the University and in the field under the supervision of the student’s major advisor.

  
  • EDN 6000. Thesis in Education (3-6 credits)


    The student prepares a Master’s Degree thesis in the area of the student’s major under the individual direction of the student’s major advisor and thesis committee. Graded on a Satisfactory (Pass [P]), Unsatisfactory (Fail [F]) basis. PREREQ: Completion of 2I semester hours of graduate work; EDN 5660 ; permission of the student’s major advisor; and permission of the Dean of Graduate Studies.


Special Topics in Education

  
  • EDNS 4xxx. Special Topics (1-3 credits)


    Examination of a special area or topic of special importance and relevance within the field of education. Topics to be considered will be announced prior to registration and may vary. This course may be repeated for different topics. PREREQ: Permission of Instructor.

  
  • EDNS 5xxx. Special Topics (1-3 credits)


    Examination of a special area or topic of special importance and relevance within the field of education. Topics to be considered will be announced prior to registration and may vary. PREREQ: Permission of instructor. This course may be repeated for different topics.


Educational Leadership

  
  • EDNL 5030. Engaging our Families, Schools, and Communities (3 credits)


    This course will combine the latest research in partnership building with practical approaches for identifying and structuring community support. Throughout the semester, the candidate will spend considerable time developing strategies for improved community support of schools. Course projects and assignments will be field-based, collaborative, and reflective best practices in constructivist teaching and learning.

  
  • EDNL 5710. Analyzing Educational Issues (3 credits)


    This course provides students with opportunities to critically analyze current educational issues from a variety of perspectives and disciplines including education, history, philosophy, anthropology, sociology, law, and political science.

  
  • EDNL 5720. Ethical and Societal Aspects of Educational Leadership (3 credits)


    This course examines educational leadership through an analysis of the relationship of personal values and the core values of society to education. There is emphasis on understanding of and sensitivity to the societal dimension of educational decision making.

  
  • EDNL 5730. School Based Management (3 credits)


    The candidate will develop effective management strategies for school operations, understand management complexities that impact decisions related to the use of instructional time, evaluating instruction, fiscal responsibility, and resource management, internal and external communication, and public school law mandates.

  
  • EDNL 5800. Supervision and Instructional Leadership (3 credits)


    In this course, candidates focus on developing an understanding of the essential elements of developmental supervision, quality instruction, and effective learning. Particular attention is focused on knowledge and application of effective leadership models and styles for implementing quality instruction. Candidates develop supervisory skills they can use to strengthen the instructional program in schools by facilitating and supporting the professional development of teachers in order to improve student learning.

  
  • EDNL 5850. Curriculum Leadership (3 credits)


    This course is designed to introduce prospective school executives to the role of curriculum leadership and “best practices” in managing a standards-based curriculum, including local and state assessments. The candidates will demonstrate their understanding of the North Carolina School Executive Standards by creating critical evidences that align activities with specific leadership standards. Strategies for improving curricular delivery and student assessment will be explored throughout the course.

  
  • EDNL 5860. Legal Aspects of Educational Leadership (3 credits)


    Constitutional, statutory, and case law bases of educational administration; a study of legal provisions and principles relating to education at all levels. Includes research and analysis of laws dealing with pertinent educational topics.

  
  • EDNL 5880. Leading School Improvement and Organizational Change (3 credits)


    This course introduces the candidate to the school improvement process with attention to implementing change in the operations, policies, and governance of the school. The candidates will apply their understanding of key concepts that pertain to stakeholder involvement, teacher empowerment, and strategic planning for increased student achievement.

  
  • EDNL 5900. Internship and Seminar in Educational Leadership I (3 credits)


    These two courses are composed of a two-semester internship in a public school setting in order to give the candidates the opportunity to apply, practice and refine the knowledge and skills acquired from course work. During this experience the candidates will play an active role in identifying and solving a school-related problem and will also engage in the assigned duties of administering the school. The candidate will be required to develop an educational leadership internship portfolio in accordance with the specifications provided. The candidate’s internship participation will be supervised jointly by school-based administrators and university personnel and will include a reflective evaluation and an oral comprehensive exam. PREREQ: Completion of 15 hours of graduate work and permission of program director.

  
  • EDNL 5950. Internship and Seminar in Educational Leadership II (3 credits)


    These two courses are composed of a two-semester internship in a public school setting in order to give the candidates the opportunity to apply, practice and refine the knowledge and skills acquired from course work. During this experience the candidates will play an active role in identifying and solving a school-related problem and will also engage in the assigned duties of administering the school. The candidate will be required to develop an educational leadership internship portfolio in accordance with the specifications provided. The candidate’s internship participation will be supervised jointly by school-based administrators and university personnel and will include a reflective evaluation and an oral comprehensive exam. PREREQ: Completion of 15 hours of graduate work and permission of program director.


English Education

  
  • EED 3840. Literature and Reading for Adolescents (6-12): Methods and Materials (3 credits)


    A survey of literature and reading for adolescents, grades 6‑12, incorporating varied methods of approaching and assessing the study of literature and managing the reading program within pluralistic classrooms. Experiences include classroom presentations in various literary genres, activities appropriate for students with advanced or deficient reading skills, and classroom observations (10 hours). PREREQ: 2.7 GPA and C or better in EDN 2100.

  
  • EED 3890. The Teaching of Writing and Speech (6-12): Methods and Materials (3 credits)


    Preparation for teaching oral and written communications skills in the middle and secondary schools. Study and application of principles, terminology, materials, and strategies for teaching and assessing writing and speech within an integrated language arts curriculum. Experiences include writing workshops, unit and lesson planning, oral presentations, technology applications, and observing and assisting in the Writing Center and in writing and speech classrooms (15 hours). PREREQ: 2.7 GPA and C or better in EDN 2100.

  
  • EED 4020. Methods of Teaching Dramatic Literature and Performance (3 credits)


    Purposes, methods, materials, and evaluation procedures in the area; directed observation in the secondary school; preparation of teaching plans and materials. PREREQ: THE 3040  recommended.

  
  • EED 4490. Internship for English/Language Arts in Secondary/Middle Schools (9 credits)


    Provides relevant intensive full-semester internship experiences in off-campus public school setting or settings Requires a continuous full-time teaching experience in secondary English. Pass/Fail grading. PREREQ: admission to professional semester.

  
  • EED 4750. Professional Seminar in Secondary/Middle Grades English/Language Arts (3 credits)


    Philosophy of English curricula and purposes of Standard Course of Study; applications in concrete teaching situations of appropriate methods and materials of instruction and assessment procedures; reflection on teaching practice. Seminar designed to parallel the full-semester internship/teaching experience in English Education (EED 4490 ). PREREQ: Admission to professional semester.

  
  • EED 5010. The Teaching of English, Methods and Materials 6-12 (3 credits)


    Incorporates methods of approaching and assessing the study of literature and managing the reading program within pluralistic classrooms. Course activities, readings, and assignments emphasize contemporary issues and state-of-the-art approaches to curriculum design and methodology in the teaching of English. Course experiences are designed to support the development of professional, reflective, and research-based practitioners in the field of English teaching

  
  • EED 5510. The Teaching of Writing: Theory and Practice (3 credits)


    Study and classroom application of composition theories (current-traditional, expressive, cognitive, social epistemic) and scholarship on writing. Study and application of types of writing, writing assignments, writing curricula and units, and strategies for teaching and assessing writing in English and Language Arts classes (6-12) and college composition courses. Specific topics may include process writing, writing across the curriculum, integrated language arts, adapting to diverse learners, technology applications, and alignment with the N.C. Standard Course of Study.

  
  • EED 5520. The Teaching of Literature: Theories, Issues, and Practices (3 credits)


    Theories of literary interpretation and their application to curricula and pedagogy for students with diverse learning styles, cultural backgrounds, and developmental needs; assessment of reading and literature; applications of technology, multidisciplinary approaches, and scholarly research through clinical experiences in literature classes; understanding purposes, genres, and conventions of written, spoken, media texts.

  
  • EED 5810. Internship in English Education (3 credits)


    Culminating clinical practice for Secondary (9-12) English or Middle Grades (6-9) Language Arts initial teacher licensure. Course requirements include completion of program and licensure requirements, including full-time pre-service student internship or in-service teaching in a public-school setting in the licensure area. 3 credit hours 

      PREREQ: Approval of the English Education Program Director.


Engineering

  
  • EGR 2000. Engineering Statics (3 credits)


    The study of engineering statics using vector calculus. Basic concepts, forces, and equilibrium analysis, distributed forces, centroids, moments of inertia, virtual work, applications to machines, structures, and systems. PREREQ/COREQ: PHY 2000 , MAT 2210 .

  
  • EGR 2010. Engineering Dynamics (3 credits)


    The study of engineering dynamics using vector calculus. Equations of motion, kinematics, kinetics of mass points and systems of mass points, kinetics, and kinematics of rigid bodies. PREREQ: EGR 2000 .

  
  • EGR 2050. Engineering Graphics (2 credits)


    Introduction to graphical representation and engineering drawing. Instrument and freehand drawing of structures and machine parts, including isometric, oblique, and perspective drawings, sectional and auxiliary views, and orthographic projections. (Laboratory)


Elementary Education

  
  • ELE 2010. Child Development and Cultural Dynamics (3 credits)


    This course focuses on conceptualizing the profession of teaching through the specific development, nurturing relationships and shared responsibility of educating children at the elementary school. Establishing ways in which learning takes place in elementary settings for the appropriate levels of intellectual, physical, social, and emotional development of elementary students. Through this course, students will prepare to build partnerships with all segments of the school culture including parents, school and the community with effective family and community involvement. PREREQ: Must have no less than a 2.7 Grade Point Average

  
  • ELE 2040. Teaching Practices and Curriculum in Elementary Education (3 credits)


    This course is an exploration of traditional and contemporary perspectives on teaching and learning and how they apply to individual differences through the analysis of contemporary educational issues from teachers’ perspectives; exploration of personal needs and goals in relation to teaching the understanding of diversity and communication with students from different cultural backgrounds, abilities, and values. Field Experience Required.  PREREQ: Completion of 30 semester hours and 2.7 GPA

  
  • ELE 3000. Arts Integration in the Elementary School (3 credits)


    This course involves methods, media, materials and techniques for integrating the arts in daily classroom instruction, investigated through the 21st century teaching and learning skills including discovery, imagination, innovation, exploration, reflection, and evaluation. Collaborative techniques are examined, connected to elementary teaching through Music, Visual Arts, Theatre Arts, Movement and Dance. Field experience required. PREREQ: Admission to Teacher Education

  
  • ELE 3010. Differentiated Instruction for Today’s Learners (3 credits)


    Classroom content area design and management strategies for individual differences and exceptionalities that focus on ways teachers use ongoing differentiated instruction to create a responsive classroom learning community. Course emphasis will be engaging students in multisensory approaches to promote skills and strategies for self-directed life-long learning. PREREQ: Admission to Teacher Education

  
  • ELE 3020. Classroom Design and Management (3 credits)


    This course explores best practices of effective classroom design and management, organization and time management, and how to establish a productive classroom climate. There is an emphasis on increasing student motivation in diverse classroom settings, building positive student-teacher relationships, behavior management, and effective parent and community partnerships. Field Experience Required. PREREQ: Admission to Teacher Education.

  
  • ELE 3030. Purposeful Assessment for Learning (3 credits)


    This course is designed to introduce students to current national, state, and local classroom assessment data practices and alignment of practices with desired classroom and student outcomes. Teacher candidates learn how to make data-driven decisions through selection of appropriate assessment instruments, observing and recording data, analyzing test scores and performance, interpreting data, and creating accommodations and plans for remediation of diverse learners. Field experience required.

      PREREQ: Admission to Teacher Education.

  
  • ELE 3040. Teaching Mathematics in the Elementary School I (3 credits)


    This course is designed to provide an in-depth study of mathematics processes and pedagogies that support developmentally appropriate mathematics instruction in grades K-2. Current standards, research, educational practice, and instructional materials are analyzed in relation to a comprehensive, balanced approach to planning, instruction, and assessment. Teacher candidates critically examine research-based theories and best practices that support children’s developing mathematics skills and reasoning. Field Experience Required.  PREREQ: Admission to Teacher Education.

  
  • ELE 3060. Literacy and Language Arts: Developing Readers and Writers (3 credits)


    This course explores key factors influencing children’s literacy development. Teacher candidates critically examine and select appropriate and effective instructional materials and best practices that support children’s developing literacy and language learning, including the role of phonics, diagnostic and formative assessments, and strategies for supporting developing readers and writers. Field Experience Required. PREREQ: Admission to Teacher Education.

  
  • ELE 4030. Living in a Global Society (3 credits)


    This course is designed to reinforce the sociocultural context in which K-6 social studies are taught with an emphasis on ways to engage diverse learners with the social studies in ways that are meaningful and authentic. Emphasis includes our multicultural and global society and exploring differentiated teaching strategies that fit a variety learning environments. Field experience required.  PREREQ: Admission to Teacher Education Program.

  
  • ELE 4060. Internship in Elementary Education (9 credits)


    This course entails a highly interactive semester-long, full-time internship experience in a public school elementary K-6 classroom. Pass/Fail grading. PREREQ: Admission to the Professional Semester

  
  • ELE 4070. Professional Seminar in Elementary Education (3 credits)


    This course is designed to parallel the full-semester internship experience involving candidates in a professional learning community. Teacher candidates will complete portfolio assessments supporting the internship. Pass/Fail grading.   PREREQ: Admission to the Professional Semester.

  
  • ELE 4110. Teaching Mathematics in the Elementary School II (3 credits)


    This course is designed to provide an in-depth study of mathematics processes and pedagogies that support developmentally appropriate mathematics instruction in grades 3-6. Current standards, research, educational practice, and instructional materials are analyzed in relation to a comprehensive, balanced approach to planning instruction and assessment. Teacher candidates critically examine research‐based theories and best practices that support children’s developing mathematics skills and reasoning. Field Experience Required. PREREQ: Admission to Teacher Education.

  
  • ELE 4120. Teaching Science in the Elementary School (3 credits)


    This course is designed to provide an in-depth study of science processes and pedagogies that support developmentally appropriate instruction in process skills and science concept understanding in the elementary school classroom. Current standards, research, educational practices, and instructional materials are analyzed in relation to a comprehensive, balanced approach to science instruction. Teacher candidates critically examine research‐based theories and best practices that support children’s developing science skills and understanding of concepts in life, physical, earth/space science, and health/wellness. Field Experience Required.

      PREREQ: Admission to Teacher Education.

  
  • ELE 4150. Literacy and Language Arts: Fluent Readers and Writers (3 credits)


    This course highlights methods for incorporating reading and writing across the curriculum with a focus on inquiry learning. Candidates explore methods for helping students develop the knowledge skills and dispositions that lead to deeper understandings in the content areas. Emphasis includes comprehension strategies, study skills, uses of technology in the elementary classroom, questioning, discussion skills and integrating writing and literature across the curriculum. Field Experience Required. PREREQ: Admission to Teacher Education

  
  • ELE 5700. Language, Literacy, and Diversity (3 credits)


    The purpose of this course is to provide a focus on contexts and processes through which language develops including attainment of second languages, and the cognitive, social/emotional, and cultural aspects of language. This foundation provides the framework to differentiate curricula, instruction and assessment in listening, speaking, reading, writing, and viewing through the use of culturally diverse and appropriate literature. Candidates will demonstrate collaboration skills with families and specialists within the school settings.

  
  • ELE 5750. Curricula Design and Choices (3 credits)


    The purpose of this course is to assist teachers in developing a comprehensive understanding and ability to implement curriculum frameworks in the 21st century classroom. Candidates will use philosophical viewpoints to inform decisions related to organization, structure, and sequence of curriculum, selection of resources, approaches to engaging learners in inclusive, supportive environments and assessment of learner outcomes.

  
  • ELE 5775. Development, Diversity, and Differentiated Instruction (3 credits)


    The purpose of this course is to assist candidates in developing a contextual perception of diverse learners and their educational needs based on information about children’s family life, culture, and stages of development. Candidates will assess children’s development, align curriculum, design instruction to accommodate developmental and cultural differences, and establish respectful learning environments. Candidates will also explore ways to nurture and motivate family involvement in the education process

  
  • ELE 5800. Advanced Elementary Mathematics and Science (3 credits)


    The purpose of this course is to assist candidates in deepening their understanding of mathematics and science in facilitating student learning. Emphasis placed on a constructivist approach to learning and incorporating research as it translates to instructional practices.

  
  • ELE 5850. Advanced Elementary Social Studies and Language Arts (3 credits)


    The purpose of this course is to provide an opportunity for candidates to improve student learning in social studies and language arts through systematic analysis and reflection on the cycles of teaching and learning. A primary focus is placed on connecting curriculum and instructional design, desired learning outcomes, content, diverse learners, instructional resources and assessment measures, in the context of developing global understandings and multiple literacies.

  
  • ELE 5900. Professional Development and Leadership Seminar (3 credits)


    The purpose of this course is to provide a capstone experience for candidates to integrate the knowledge and insights gained from experiences in previous courses into final revisions of their professional portfolio. Based on updated self‐assessment, candidates develop goals for future professional development and complete data analysis and conclusions to finalize leadership and action research projects.


Emergency Management

  
  • EMG 5150. Introduction to Emergency Management (3 credits)


    This course will introduce students to the fundamental elements of emergency management: its evolution, the history and growth of emergency management, and the contemporary practice of strategic emergency management. The multidisciplinary origins of emergency management will be explored along with its evolving status as a profession. The significance of emergency management to modern government will be addressed. The course will present the development of integrative concepts and phases in emergency management: preparedness, response, recovery, and mitigation. The concept of comprehensive emergency management will be examined along with its multi-sector institutional base. Cases scenarios, and similar techniques will be employed throughout the course.

  
  • EMG 5160. Sustainability and Hazard Resilience (3 credits)


    This course will address the issues, strategies, and techniques related to sustainable disaster planning and hazard mitigation. Of special interest will be the linkages between planning, mitigation, and the building of hazard resilient communities. Federal policy initiatives, local initiatives, and the planning tools and techniques in relation to these will be explored.

  
  • EMG 5170. Crisis Leadership and Sustainability (3 credits)


    The course explores the concept of crisis, crisis leadership, and the political and administrative challenges to those with leadership roles and responsibilities in crisis environments and situations. Special emphasis is given to the need to create conditions of political, social, economic, and cultural sustainability in crisis environments and situations. Crisis is presented through a series of cases and research results. Leadership actions and behaviors are learned and reinforced by guided participation in research projects, scenario construction, realistic exercises and other applications.

  
  • EMG 5180. Social Equity in Emergency Management (3 credits)


    The importance of social and cultural factors has long been embraced in the field of public management. It is a fact that attention to special needs, regional, and cultural differences will improve both the equity and efficiency of operations in emergency management. This course focuses on the role of social, cultural, and physical differences among the many populations in the United States in emergency response and individual resilience.

  
  • EMG 5190. Technological Applications in Emergency Management (3 credits)


    This course will explore the emerging role of technology in effective emergency management. Specific applications and usages of modern technology, with an emphasis on information technology, will be addressed. Various software packages applicable to emergency management for modeling the effects of a disaster will be addressed. Among the topics covered: modeling the effects of disaster, risk analysis, the practical applications of Geographic Information Systems (GIS), and the uses of information technology in the four phases (preparedness, response, recovery, mitigation) of emergency management.

 

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