May 25, 2024  
The University of North Carolina at Pembroke 2019-2020 Catalog 
    
The University of North Carolina at Pembroke 2019-2020 Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Emergency Management

  
  • EMG 5620. Professional Paper (3 credits)


    Crosslisted: (CRJ 5620, HAD 5620, PAD 5620)
    A directed, supervised activity in which the student develops and analyzes a suitable topic, issue, or problem in leadership or management. The research subject must be one which can be addressed through the application of the knowledge and the research skill gained from course work (see Overview).

  
  • EMG 5750. Capstone in Emergency Management (3 credits)


    This course serves to coalesce the knowledge and tools acquired in the EM concentration by assigning teams of students actual projects in Emergency Management. Faculty will guide students through projects applying state of the art knowledge, tools, and technology aimed at solving real problems at the local, state, regional, and national level.

  
  • EMG 5800. Disaster Recovery and Sustainability (3 credits)


    This course deals with the complex political, social, and administrative process of disaster recovery. The emergent concept of sustainable recovery will be explored in the context of the other components of emergency management, federal and state recovery assistance processes, pre-event recovery planning, and other forms of community planning, long-term restoration planning, and hazard mitigation planning. The course will employ a variety of instructional approaches using existing cases, scenarios, and recovery exercises.


Special Topics in Emergency Management

  
  • EMGS 5900. Special Topics in Emergency Management (3 credits)


    This is a variable content course in emergency management in which students will have an opportunity to pursue issues and advanced study of topics that are not a part of the regular curriculum. Special topics courses will be of variable credit hours (1-3) and students may take up to three hours of special topics credit.


English

  
  • ENG 0104. Written Communication Skills (3 credits)


    Introduces students to academic ways of reading, writing, and thinking. Students cultivate reading and writing strategies in order to understand, paraphrase, and summarize, producing several short texts. (Will not count toward earned hours or graduation requirements.) Required for students placed into ENG 0104 and for students in the College Opportunity Program.

  
  • ENG 1020. Laboratory in Writing I (1 credit)


    In a writing laboratory environment designed to support ENG 1050 , students will participate in activities and small group workshops in the practice of written communication and composition. (repeatable up to 2 credits) PREREQ: Permission of instructor.

  
  • ENG 1030. Laboratory in Writing II (1 credit)


    In a writing laboratory environment designed to support ENG 1060 , students will participate in activities and small group workshops in the practice of written communication and composition. (repeatable up to 2 credits) PREREQ: Permission of instructor.

  
  • ENG 1050. Composition I (3 credits)


    Provides students with a foundation in critical reading and writing practices by introducing different types of texts and ways of working with them; students will recognize and interpret differing perspectives and will analyze and synthesize others’ work, producing several texts of moderate length. PREREQ:  Placement into ENG 1050 or “C” grade or better in ENG 0104 .

  
  • ENG 1060. Composition II (3 credits)


    Builds upon the critical reading and writing practices developed in ENG 1050 and focuses on research principles and practices. Students will locate and evaluate sources; negotiate differing perspectives; synthesize and integrate sources ethically; arrive at a claim through logical reasoning; and argue the claim in rhetorically effective forms, producing several sophisticated texts. PREREQ: “C” grade or better in ENG 1050 .

  
  • ENG 1910. Spelling (1 credit)


    A review of major spelling rules in English, with special attention to particular words that often give difficulty. Attention to techniques to aid memorization of particular problem words.

  
  • ENG 1920. Vocabulary Building (1 credit)


    A study of methods of vocabulary enrichment (such as association by sound, appearance, meaning, and knowledge of common root, prefix/suffix meanings). Specific words are studied.

  
  • ENG 1930. Pronunciation (1 credit)


    An intensive course to improve students’ competence and confidence in oral use of language. Overviews of English phonology and the International Phonetic Alphabet and specific problem words included.

  
  • ENG 1940. English Usage (1 credit)


    Intensive review of parts of speech and their use in the sentence. Study of punctuation forms. Analysis of verb problems and errors that obscure meaning or distract readers.

  
  • ENG 1950. Sentence Mastery (1 credit)


    Practice in imitating various sentence structures to add variety and impact to writing.

  
  • ENG 1960. Punctuation (1 credit)


    Study of specific punctuation rules and their application, with particular emphasis on commas, semicolons, and apostrophes.

  
  • ENG 2010. Southern Literature (3 credits)


    A survey of literature by writers from the Southern part of the United States. Readings may include novels, short fiction, and poetry by authors such as Faulkner, O’Connor, Welty, Hurston, and McCarthy. PREREQ: “C” grade or better in ENG 1050 .

  
  • ENG 2020. Contemporary Literature (3 credits)


    A survey of literature from 1945 to the present, introducing students to trends and major developments in fiction, poetry, and drama. Authors may include Ginsberg, Atwood, Beckett, Stoppard, Walcott, Mahfouz, Oe, and Fuentes. PREREQ: “C” grade or better in ENG 1050 .

  
  • ENG 2030. Literary Genres (3 credits)


    Study of basic structure or elements of the various genres of literature including poetry, prose fiction, and drama. Readings include works of major British, American, and world literature authors. PREREQ: “C” grade or better in ENG 1050 .

  
  • ENG 2050. World Literature Before 1660 (3 credits)


    A survey of western and non-western literature from the beginnings through the Renaissance considered within the cultural epochs of their creation, including the Classical Period, the Middle Ages, and the Renaissance. Readings may include Gilgamesh, The Ramayana, and selections from authors such as Homer, Ovid, Confucius, Dante, Montaigne, and Cervantes. PREREQ: “C” grade or better in ENG 1050 .

  
  • ENG 2060. World Literature After 1660 (3 credits)


    A survey of western and non-western literature from the Enlightenment through the Twentieth Century considered within the cultural epochs of their creation, including the Enlightenment, Romanticism, Realism, Modernism, and the contemporary world. Authors may include Moliere, Goethe, Kafka, Camus, Achebe, and Garcia Marquez. PREREQ: “C” grade or better in ENG 1050 .

  
  • ENG 2080. Women’s Literature (3 credits)


    A survey of literature written by women of diverse periods and backgrounds, introducing students to a variety of genres and trends in women’s literature. Authors may include Wollstonecraft, Fuller, Woolf, Brooks, Rich, Kingston, and Kincaid. PREREQ: “C” grade or better in ENG 1050 .

  
  • ENG 2090. Literature and Film (3 credits)


    A survey of the relationships between literary texts and films with emphasis on film adaptations; includes methods of analysis, discussion of theory, process, reception, and the cultural contexts of the works considered. PREREQ: “C” grade or better in ENG 1050 .

  
  • ENG 2100. African American Literature (3 credits)


    A survey of African American literature, introducing students to genres, trends, and major periods of African American literature, ranging from 18th- and 19th-century autobiographies and narratives to 20th-century works. Authors may include Douglass, Morrison, Wright, and Toomer. PREREQ: “C” grade or better in ENG 1050 .

  
  • ENG 2180. Asian American Literature (3 credits)


    A survey of literature written by Asian American writers introducing a variety of genres and trends in Asian American literature. Readings include short stories, novels, plays, and critical essays produced by Asian American writers, and discussions examine the formation of Asian American subjectivities within socioeconomic, cultural, and political contexts. PREREQ: “C” grade or better in ENG 1050 .

  
  • ENG 2190. Latino Literature (3 credits)


    A survey of literature by writers of Latin American heritage writing in English. This course examines the experience and dilemmas of Mexicans, Cubans, Puerto Ricans, Dominicans, and other established and immigrant US Hispanic/Latino groups by studying recent writers and filmmakers, including an examination of the media images of Latinos. Topics include essentialism, biculturalism, marginality, transculturation, and acculturation. PREREQ: “C” grade or better in ENG 1050 .

  
  • ENG 2200. Native American Literature (3 credits)


    Crosslisted: (AIS 2200)
    A survey of literature produced by Native Americans. The course will cover fiction and poetry, and close attention will be paid to historical contexts and themes central to the understanding of Native American literature. Authors may include Momaday, Silko, Hogan, Vizenor, Welch, and Erdrich. PREREQ: “C” grade or better in ENG 1050 .

  
  • ENG 2230. American Literature Before 1865 (3 credits)


    A survey of notable authors and literary movements from the period preceding and including the Civil War. Readings may include nonfiction, poetry, short fiction, and at least one novel. Authors may include Bradstreet, Poe, Emerson, Douglass, and Dickinson. PREREQ: “C” grade or better in ENG 1050 .

  
  • ENG 2240. American Literature Since 1865 (3 credits)


    A survey of notable authors and literary movements between the end of the Civil War and the present. Readings may include nonfiction, poetry, drama, short fiction, and at least one novel. Authors may include Twain, Chopin, Faulkner, Hughes, and Walker. PREREQ: “C” grade or better in ENG 1050 .

  
  • ENG 2410. Environmental Literature (3 credits)


    Crosslisted: (AIS 2410)
    Survey of Indigenous and multinational environmental literature and its relationship to race, class, gender, sexuality, and/or dis/ability, attentive to local human and ecological communities. Variety of authors and genres. PREREQ: “C” grade or better in ENG 1050 .

  
  • ENG 2450. Introduction to Rhetoric (3 credits)


    Study of principles fundamental to persuasion and argument, including audience, purpose, rhetorical situation, genre, rhetorical appeals, commonplaces, and methods of reasoning. PREREQ: “C” or better in ENG 1050  and ENG 1060 .

  
  • ENG 2470. British Literature Before 1790 (3 credits)


    A survey of British literature from the Anglo-Saxon through the Neo-Classical in several genres. Readings may include Beowulf and works by authors such as Chaucer, More, Spenser, Shakespeare, Jonson, Milton, Swift, Defoe, and Behn. PREREQ: “C” grade or better in ENG 1050 .

  
  • ENG 2480. British Literature After 1790 (3 credits)


    A survey of British literature from the Romantics to the contemporary, including Colonial and Post- Colonial literatures in several genres. Authors may include Blake, Wordsworth, Shelley, the Brontes, Hopkins, Yeats,

  
  • ENG 2760. Writing Creative Nonfiction I (3 credits)


    An introduction to the principles and techniques of writing creative nonfiction. Workshop format.

  
  • ENG 2780. Writing Poetry I (3 credits)


    An introduction to the principles and techniques of writing poetry. Workshop format.

  
  • ENG 2790. Writing Fiction I (3 credits)


    An introduction to the principles and techniques of writing fiction. Workshop format.

  
  • ENG 2860. Literary Magazine Production (1 credit)


    This course provides experience in the details of producing a literary publication and in using desktop publishing software through work on the UNCP student literary magazine, The Aurochs. Activities will include layout design, artwork selection and cropping, editing, typesetting, and general production work. Pass/Fail grading.

  
  • ENG 2870. Literary Magazine Production (1 credit)


    This course provides experience in the details of producing a literary publication and in using desktop publishing software through work on the UNCP student literary magazine, The Aurochs. Activities will include layout design, artwork selection and cropping, editing, typesetting, and general production work. Pass/Fail grading.

  
  • ENG 2900. Film and New Media Criticism (3 credits)


    A study of film history and theory focusing on the development of New Media. Topics include theory in early Russian cinema, avant-garde and surrealist film of the 1920s, cinema vérité of the 1960s, the Dogma 95 group, the uses of digital film, computer-generated imagery (CGI), and a discussion of nonsequential, multilinear, and interactive narratives. The emphasis in the course will be on defining and responding critically to New Media.

  
  • ENG 2990. Writing Center Theory and Practice (3 credits)


    An introduction to Writing Center theory and practice using readings, classroom discussion, observation, role-playing, and supervised tutoring practice. PREREQ: “C” or better in ENG 1050 .

  
  • ENG 3040. Principles of Literary Study (3 credits)


    Required of all English majors. Preparation for the study of literature, including methods of literary research, writing about literature, and overview of literary theories. In a workshop environment, students in each section will read at least one common assigned literary text and will gain an advanced understanding of the conventions of scholarly writing in literary studies. PREREQ: “C” or better in ENG 1060  and “C” or better in one 2000-level literature course. Highly recommended during the first term of English major, minor, or concentration study.

  
  • ENG 3070. Professional Editing (3 credits)


    Introduces students to professional editing practices. Students will learn skills needed to become a professional editor and will explore legal and ethical responsibilities inherent in professional editing. Students will be introduced to different kinds of editing (including comprehensive editing, copy editing, and proofreading), and they will edit manuscripts from different genres and disciplines for a professional client. PREREQ: “C” or better in ENG 1050 and ENG 1060

  
  • ENG 3100. The Harlem Renaissance (3 credits)


    In-depth study of major writers and genres of the Harlem Renaissance in its intellectual, cultural, and historical contexts. PREREQ: ENG 3040  or permission of the instructor.

  
  • ENG 3110. Medieval British Literature (3 credits)


    A critical study of selected British Literature from the Anglo-Saxon period through the early Tudor era. May include such genres as heroic, courtly, hagiographical, and mystical literature. PREREQ: ENG 3040  or permission of the instructor.

  
  • ENG 3120. Early Modern British Literature (3 credits)


    A critical study of British Literature from Skelton to Milton; particular focus on the Elizabethan era. May include such genres as the lyric, the sonnet sequence, the romantic epic, prose fiction, drama, and poetic theory. PREREQ: ENG 3040  or permission of the instructor.

  
  • ENG 3130. The American Renaissance (3 credits)


    A critical study of the literary movements that flourished in America during the mid-nineteenth century. May include a discussion of American Gothicism, Sentimentalism, Romanticism, Realism, Transcendentalism, and Slave Narratives. PREREQ: ENG 3040  or permission of the instructor.

  
  • ENG 3140. American Literature in Transition, 1870-1914 (3 credits)


    A critical study of American literature from Post-Reconstruction to WWI in relation to social and cultural influences and the struggle for an American literary identity. May include a discussion of Realism, Naturalism, Late Sentimentalism, Regionalism, New (Race) Woman, Imagism, and Modernism. PREREQ: ENG 3040  or permission of the instructor.

  
  • ENG 3150. British Romantic Literature (3 credits)


    A critical study of selected literature of the Romantic period in Britain, covering representative authors and texts of fiction, poetry, and nonfiction prose, with an emphasis on poetry. The course examines Romantic literature in relation to social and cultural contexts, including political theory and revolutions, the Romantic hero, aesthetic and poetic theories, and artistic representations of nature and the imagination. PREREQ: ENG 3040  or permission of the instructor.

  
  • ENG 3160. Victorian Literature (3 credits)


    A critical study of selected literature of the Victorian period, covering representative authors and texts of fiction, poetry, and non-fiction prose. The course examines Victorian literature in relation to social and cultural contexts, including industrialization, social class and social reform, roles of women and children, religion, and science, monarchy and empire, and conditions of literary publication. PREREQ: ENG 3040  or permission of the instructor.

  
  • ENG 3170. Post-Colonial Literature (3 credits)


    A critical study of selected literature written in English from regions in the former British empire, such as Africa, the Caribbean, the Indian Subcontinent, and South-East Asia,, covering representative authors and texts of fiction, poetry, and non-fiction prose. The course examines the literature in relation to historical, cultural, and social contexts especially those concerning British colonialism and the fall of empire in the last century, the establishment of new national identities, and issues such as hybridity, transnationalism, ethnicity and indigeneity, and feminism. PREREQ: ENG 3040  or permission of the instructor.

  
  • ENG 3250. Language in Society (3 credits)


    A sociolinguistic study of language including the nature of variation in language (varieties, dialects, and registers), language and gender, language and culture, and the politics of language.

  
  • ENG 3420. The British Novel (3 credits)


    A critical study of the English novel from the eighteenth century to the present, with emphasis on social history and narrative technique. PREREQ: ENG 3040  or permission of instructor; ENG 2470  or ENG 2480  recommended.

  
  • ENG 3430. The American Novel (3 credits)


    A critical study of the American novel from its inception to the present, with emphasis on social history and narrative technique. PREREQ: ENG 3040  or permission of instructor; ENG 2230  or ENG 2240  recommended.

  
  • ENG 3440. The Native American Novel (3 credits)


    Crosslisted: (AIS 3440)
    A critical study of the Native American Novel from its inception to the present, with emphasis on social, political, and cultural history. Particular attention will be paid to the narrative techniques of these authors with a focus on the relationship between oral traditions and the form of the novel. PREREQ: ENG 3040  or permission of instructor.

  
  • ENG 3460. Aspects of the English Language (3 credits)


    An introduction to the English language including applied study of such topics as the history of the language and its acquisition, dialects, semantics, lexicography, phonology, orthography, grammatical systems, and standards of modern English usage.

  
  • ENG 3470. Native American Poetry (3 credits)


    Crosslisted: (AIS 3470)
    A critical study of Native American poetry and poetics, with emphasis on social, political, cultural, and Native national histories. Particular attention will be paid to the techniques of these authors with a focus on the relationship between oral traditions and contemporary poetry. PREREQ: ENG 3040 , or permission of instructor.

  
  • ENG 3540. Modern Drama (3 credits)


    A study of selections from the drama of the Western world of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. PREREQ: ENG 3040  or permission of instructor; six semester hours of 2000‑level literature.

  
  • ENG 3560. Modernist Fiction (3 credits)


    A critical study of selected works of fiction from the first half of the twentieth century, covering representative authors of the short story, novella, and novel. The course examines modernist fiction in relation to social and cultural contexts, with particular attention to experimentation, the avant garde, and narrative technique. PREREQ: ENG 3040  or permission of instructor.

  
  • ENG 3570. History of Rhetoric (3 credits)


    Study of the history and theory of rhetoric from classical to modern periods. PREREQ: “C” or better in ENG 1050  and ENG 1060 .

  
  • ENG 3580. Professional Writing (3 credits)


    Study of the history, theory, and practice of professional and technical writing. Topics might include audience analysis, research methods, visual rhetoric, culture of the workplace, and collaboration. Writing genres might include resumes, application letters, memoranda, proposals, formal reports, manuals, and others. PREREQ: “C” or better in ENG 1050  and ENG 1060 .

  
  • ENG 3650. Writing in Digital Environments (3 credits)


    The study of the relation of rhetorical theory to digital writing and web design, focusing on both written and visual awareness when creating and developing digital writing projects. PREREQ: “C” or better in ENG 1050  and ENG 1060 .

  
  • ENG 3660. Modernist Poetry (3 credits)


    A critical study of selected works of poetry from the first half of the twentieth century. The course examines modernist poetry in relation to social and cultural contexts, with particular attention to experimentation and avant-garde poetics. PREREQ: ENG 3040  or permission of instructor.

  
  • ENG 3670. Contemporary Fiction (3 credits)


    A critical study of selected works of fiction from post-World War II to the present, covering representative authors of the short story, novella, and novel. The course examines contemporary fiction in relation to social and cultural contexts, with particular attention to modernism, postmodernism, and narrative technique. PREREQ: ENG 3040  or permission of instructor.

  
  • ENG 3680. Contemporary Poetry (3 credits)


    A critical study of selected works of poetry from post-World War II to the present, representing the stylistic, thematic, and cultural diversity so apparent in late twentieth-century and early twenty-first century poetry. The course examines contemporary poetry in relation to social and cultural contexts, with particular attention to modernism, postmodernism, and new forms and modes of expression. PREREQ: ENG 3040  or permission of instructor.

  
  • ENG 3700. Advanced Composition (3 credits)


    An upper‑division academic writing course for students majoring in the arts, humanities, and sciences, especially those anticipating graduate level and professional writing demands. PREREQ: “C” grade or better in ENG 1050  and ENG 1060 .

  
  • ENG 3710. English Grammar (3 credits)


    A thorough review of traditional grammar, discussions of sentence patterns, transformations, and both old and new diagram forms included.

  
  • ENG 3720. Civic Writing (3 credits)


    Study and practice of argumentation that situates rhetoric as an art of civic discourse. Students will learn how writers identify and define public audiences rhetorically by analyzing and evaluating the various positions held in any public debate and will develop skills to advocate their own position effectively. PREREQ: “C” or better in ENG 1050 and ENG 1060

  
  • ENG 3740. Writing Poetry II (3 credits)


    An advanced workshop in writing poetry, building on fundamentals covered in the introductory course and emphasizing manuscript preparation and submission. PREREQ: ENG 2780  or permission of instructor.

  
  • ENG 3750. Writing Fiction II (3 credits)


    An advanced workshop in writing fiction, building on fundamentals covered in the introductory course and emphasizing manuscript preparation and submission. PREREQ: ENG 2790  or permission of instructor.

  
  • ENG 3760. Writing Creative Nonfiction II (3 credits)


    An advanced workshop in writing creative nonfiction, building on fundamentals covered in the introductory course and emphasizing manuscript preparation and submission. PREREQ: ENG 2760  or permission of instructor.

  
  • ENG 3860. Literary Magazine Production (1 credit)


    This course provides experience in the details of producing a literary publication and in using desktop publishing software through work on the UNCP student literary magazine, The Aurochs. Activities will include layout design, artwork selection and cropping, editing, typesetting, and general production work. Pass/Fail grading.

  
  • ENG 3870. Literary Magazine Production (1 credit)


    This course provides experience in the details of producing a literary publication and in using desktop publishing software through work on the UNCP student literary magazine, The Aurochs. Activities will include layout design, artwork selection and cropping, editing, typesetting, and general production work. Pass/Fail grading.

  
  • ENG 3900. Study Abroad (3 credits)


    An international experience designed to cultivate global understandings of literary texts and movements in English, foster deeper understandings of other cultures, and enhance skills of critical thinking and intercultural communication. May be repeated for credit when offered under a different topic. PREREQ: ENG 3040  and/or permission of instructor.

  
  • ENG 3990. Practicum in Composition Tutoring (1-2 credits)


    A supervised practicum of working as a writing assistant in an appropriate University setting or with students from area schools. (repeatable up to 4 credits)

  
  • ENG 4020. Literary Criticism (3 credits)


    Study of important texts from major schools of literary theory and contemporary critical approaches to analyzing literature, which may include structuralism, deconstruction, Marxism, psychoanalysis, identity theories, new historicism, and ecocriticism, among others. PREREQ: ENG 3040 or permission of instructor.

  
  • ENG 4210. Grant Writing (3 credits)


    An introduction to writing grants, including searching for grants, aligning grants with projects, analyzing the rhetoric of grants, conducting research, and producing drafts of grants through collaborative writing, reviewing, and editing. PREREQ: “C” or better in ENG 1050  and ENG 1060 .

  
  • ENG 4230. Special Topics in American English (3 credits)


    A study of announced topics in American English. Possible topics include issues in linguistics, grammar, literacy, varieties of English, media and language, Literary Journalism and American English as a global force.

  
  • ENG 4240. Special Topics in American English (3 credits)


    A study of announced topics in American English. Possible topics include issues in linguistics, grammar, literacy, varieties of English, media and language, Literary Journalism and American English as a global force.

  
  • ENG 4250. African American Rhetorics (3 credits)


    An in-depth study of African American political speeches, letters, sermons, essays, and book-length texts that examines the debates, strategies, styles, and persuasive practices employed by African Americans in dialogue with the larger nation and among themselves.

  
  • ENG 4260. Creative Writing Workshop (1-3 credits)


    This course will normally be taught by visiting writers and may be repeated for credit. Offered when circumstances warrant. (repeatable up to 6 credits) PREREQ: ENG 3740  or ENG 3750  or permission of Department Chair.

  
  • ENG 4500. Seminar in American Indian Literature (3 credits)


    Crosslisted: (AIS 4500)
    A study of selected topics in American Indian literature. PREREQ: Permission of instructor.

  
  • ENG 4550. Directed Studies Seminar (3 credits)


    A sequence of studies culminating in a substantive research paper or comparable project or original work. The program of studies is designed and carried out by the student in cooperation with a faculty member in the department. PREREQ: Consent of instructor.

  
  • ENG 4570. Shakespeare (3 credits)


    An introduction to the Elizabethan Theatre, a study of Shakespeare’s career as a dramatist, and a critical survey of a number of major plays-histories, comedies, and tragedies. PREREQ: ENG 3040  or permission of instructor; ENG 2470  recommended.

  
  • ENG 4810. Phonetics and Phonology (3 credits)


    A study of the speech sounds that occur in the languages of the world will cover physiological properties of the speech producing apparatus, phonetic transcription using the international phonetic alphabet, and both theoretical and applied study of phonological patterns.

  
  • ENG 4830. Second Language Acquisition (3 credits)


    An in-depth study of both theoretical issues in second language acquisition and the practical application of theory in the ESL classroom, including learning styles and strategies; the importance of affective factors and socio-cultural factors in language learning; contrastive analysis, interlanguage, and error analysis; and communicative competence.

  
  • ENG 4850. Cultural Issues of English as a Second Language (3 credits)


    A study of important cultural issues relevant to the teaching and learning of English as a second language, including bilingualism, differences in cultural patterns of perception and thinking, differences in what is considered appropriate student behavior and appropriate teacher behavior in a variety of cultures, and cultural differences expressed in verbal and non-verbal behavior. The importance of understanding and taking into account the cultural backgrounds of students in the teaching of ESL and the importance of teaching American culture as a part of ESL will also be considered.

  
  • ENG 4860. Literary Magazine Production (1 credit)


    This course provides experience in the details of producing a literary publication and in using desktop publishing software through work on the UNCP student literary magazine, The Aurochs. Activities will include layout design, artwork selection and cropping, editing, typesetting, and general production work. Pass/Fail grading.

  
  • ENG 4870. Literary Magazine Production (1 credit)


    This course provides experience in the details of producing a literary publication and in using desktop publishing software through work on the UNCP student literary magazine, The Aurochs. Activities will include layout design, artwork selection and cropping, editing, typesetting, and general production work. Pass/Fail grading.

  
  • ENG 4990. Professional Internship (3 credits)


    Provides students the opportunity to apply the academic skills they have learned in a workplace setting. Working with an approved faculty advisor, students will find an internship in a business, government, non-profit, or university setting. Students will use their research, writing, editing, proofreading, design or technology skills to create or refine one (or several) substantial organizational documents to be compiled into a professional portfolio. PREREQ: “C” or better in ENG 1050 and ENG 1060; one previous rhetoric course at the 3000 or 4000 level; and permission from instructor

  
  • ENG 5000. Literacy in Context: Issues and Reform (3 credits)


    Examinations of literacy issues from intersecting historical, global, psychological, socioeconomic, class, and curricular perspectives (including gender and race); the role of technology in literacy; theory, philosophy, and research into pedagogy addressing students’ exceptionalities and multiple intelligences; and how literacy professionals can provide leadership in the twenty-first century.

  
  • ENG 5010. Critical Approaches to Children’s Literature (3 credits)


    Introduction to current theoretical and critical approaches in the field of children’s literature. Students will read multiple theoretical and critical works, and a broad selection of novels and other works commonly read by children.

  
  • ENG 5050. Native American Literature (3 credits)


    Study of the historical and continuing contributions of Native American authors to literary studies, especially within the United States. Particular attention will be paid to the intersections of Euroamerican and Native American traditions. Topics covered may include, contemporary issues, oral and written traditions, identity, place, colonization, displacement, and differing world views.

  
  • ENG 5110. Principles of English Linguistics (3 credits)


    A study of the English language as a system of rules operating at various levels (sound, word formation, syntax, and discourse) and how this system governs and explains our everyday use of the language. The course will focus on English but will also include analysis of examples from other languages of the world for comparative purposes.

  
  • ENG 5210. Advanced Creative Writing (3 credits)


    Study and extensive practice in a variety of literary genres such as fiction, poetry, script and/or play writing, children’s literature, and others. Workshop format.

  
  • ENG 5300. Theories and Methods of Literary Research (3 credits)


    Study of the major theoretical approaches to interpreting literature; application of research methodology to study of texts, periods, genres.

  
  • ENG 5310. Medieval and Early Modern Drama (3 credits)


    Study of the transition from late medieval to early modern English drama, with particular attention to representations of the divine and supernatural.

  
  • ENG 5320. Rhetorical Analysis (3 credits)


    Study of classical and contemporary rhetorical concepts; analysis of a variety of texts such as speeches, film, advertising, news, documentaries, social media, and other persuasive artifacts; examination of the rhetorical effects of non-literary texts.

  
  • ENG 5330. Working Class Literature (3 credits)


    Study of the contributions of working-class writers from the early 20th-century to the present, especially in the U.S., with an emphasis on the intersections among race, class, and gender in working-class culture.  Particular attention will be paid to the interdisciplinary field of working-class studies.

  
  • ENG 5340. Victorian Literature (3 credits)


    A critical study of selected literature of the Victorian period in relation to social and cultural contexts, such as industrialization, social class and social reform, roles of women and children, religion, and science, monarchy and empire, and conditions of literary publication.

  
  • ENG 5500. Advanced Nonfiction Writing (3 credits)


    Study and extensive practice in expository, persuasive writing, narrative, autobiographical and biographical forms. Topics may include creative non-fiction and modern literary journalism.

  
  • ENG 5610. Shakespeare Studies (3 credits)


    An intensive study of Shakespeare and his work considering both Early Modern stage practice and Shakespeare’s later cultural impact. Course emphasis may vary to include such issues as gender, genre, race, adaptation, and performance. The course may also provide an opportunity for a trip to Shakespeare’s England.

 

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