Jan 27, 2021  
The University of North Carolina at Pembroke 2017-2018 Catalog 
    
The University of North Carolina at Pembroke 2017-2018 Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Other Courses

  
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    EDN 5810. Internship (3 credits)


    Full-time internship experiences in an off-campus public school setting appropriate for the licensure area. PREREQ: Approval of Graduate Program Director. 

  
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    GRD 5000. Graduate Continuous Enrollment (1 credit)


    This course is available for graduate students who have no program of study courses remaining, but have unfinished requirements and need to be registered for the purposes of graduation or other campus/library access. This course does not count towards a degree, is graded P/F, and permission of The Graduate School is required.  Note: Students must be enrolled during the term (semester or summer session) in which they are to graduate from the University.

  
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    NUR 5200. Issues in Community Health for Rural Populations (2-2-)) (2 credits)


    2-0
    NUR 5200. Issues in Community Health for Rural Populations (2-2-0) Students will examine selected issues that affect community health care for rural populations for nursing roles in case management or as a clinical nurse leader. The organization and financing of health care for rural populations will receive considerable attention. The nurse case manager or clinical nurse leader student will gain understanding of the development of health care policy and the ethical, political, economic, sociocultural, and technological forces influencing the delivery of care.  PREREQ: NUR 5000, 5010 PREREQ/COREQ: None COREQ: None

  
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    NUR 5220. Care Environment and Clinical Outcomes Management (3 credits)


    2-1
    Building on baccalaureate level nursing skills and foundational pathophysiology, pharmacology, and health assessment, the focus of this course is on integrative care approaches that improve health through graduate‐level nursing and collaborative planning to design systems that promote positive health outcomes. Health promotion, disease reduction, and/or prevention as health‐oriented strategies will be applied to patient care. Students will develop an outcome‐focused model that relates to a graduate-level clinical practice area and that will inform the terminal project and residency.  PREREQ: NUR 5000, 5010, 5100 and 5110 PREREQ/COREQ: None COREQ: None


Accounting

  
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    ACC 1020. Accounting for Non‐Business Majors (3 credits)


    This course is designed to develop an understanding of the basics of accounting: what accounting information is, how it is developed, how it is used, and what it means.

  
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    ACC 2270. Financial Accounting (3 credits)


    Introduction to accounting. A study of the basic accounting equation, transaction analysis, and financial statements. PREREQ: MAT 1070 or higher mathematics course.

  
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    ACC 2280. Managerial Accounting (3 credits)


    An introductory study of internal accounting with emphasis on cost analysis and budgeting. The course stresses the attention‑directing and problem‑solving function of accounting in relation to current planning and control, evaluation of performance, special decisions, and long‑range planning. PREREQ: A "C" or better in ACC 2270 .

  
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    ACC 3210. Intermediate Accounting I (3 credits)


    A study of financial accounting theory and procedures. Includes time value of money and in‑depth analysis of asset accounts. PREREQ: A "C" or better in ACC 2270 .

  
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    ACC 3220. Intermediate Accounting II (3 credits)


    A continuation of ACC 3210 . Includes in‑depth study of liability and capital accounts, revenue recognition. PREREQ: C- or better in ACC 3210.

  
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    ACC 3310. Cost Accounting (3 credits)


    Cost determination and analysis, cost control, and cost‑based decision making. Included are such topics as job order and process costing systems, application of factory overhead, and responsibility accounting. PREREQ: A "C" or better in ACC 2280 .

  
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    ACC 4130. Accounting Information Systems (3 credits)


    Basic concepts of accounting information systems including both computer based and manual systems. This course examines transaction processing systems with emphasis on internal controls and documentation, user support systems and systems development. Specific topics include spreadsheet functions, databases, etc. PREREQ: DSC 2090  and ACC 3310  or concurrent registration.

  
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    ACC 4170. Income Tax I (3 credits)


    Federal income taxes as applied to individuals and sole proprietorships. Includes an overview of the tax system and the effect that tax law has on individual economic decisions. PREREQ: ACC 2270 .

  
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    ACC 4180. Income Tax II (3 credits)


    Federal income tax laws applicable to partnerships, corporations, estates, and trusts. PREREQ: ACC 4170 .

  
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    ACC 4210. Advanced Accounting (3 credits)


    This course is a continuation of the study of financial accounting. Topics covered in this course include Business Combinations and Consolidated Financial Statements, Partnership Accounting, International Accounting Issues, and Emerging Issues vital to the practice of accounting. PREREQ: ACC 3220 .

  
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    ACC 4500. Governmental and Not‑For‑Profit Accounting (3 credits)


    Study of accounting principles unique to not‑for‑profit organizations as prescribed by generally accepted accounting principles and the Governmental Accounting Standards Board. PREREQ: A "C" or better in ACC 2280 .

  
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    ACC 4580. Auditing (3 credits)


    A study of the theory and application of generally accepted auditing standards used in the examination of financial statements. The role of internal control review, working papers, audit programs, and the auditor's liability are considered along with selected case studies. PREREQ: ACC 3220 .

  
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    ACC 4990. Directed Studies in Accounting (1-3 credits)


    Independent study in an area of accounting of particular interest to a student under the direction of one or more faculty members. Students must submit detailed proposals for a directed study, detailing the proposed plan of study, research involved, dates for deliverables, final product to be produced, and faculty who will be supervising. Proposals will be reviewed by a faculty committee to determine acceptance of the proposal. PREREQ: ACC 2270 , ACC 2280 , and permission of the Department.

  
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    ACC 5010. Foundations of Financial and Managerial Accounting (3 credits)


    This course is an accelerated course designed for students with no accounting background or as a refresher course for students who desire to review accounting before enrolling in required MBA courses. A study of the basic concepts of accounting with an emphasis on the evaluation of transactions and the preparation and analysis of financial statements including their use in the management planning and control process. (This course will not count toward the 36 hours required for the MBA degree.)

  
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    ACC 5100. Accounting Fraud in STEM Businesses (1)


    This course addresses the role of research personnel and other clinicians in preventing financial (and other) fraud in scientific, technical, and engineering  firms. The course includes an introduction to accounting principles, studies the role of internal control systems, and examines case studies of STEM firms facing significant internal control failures.

  
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    ACC 5500. Managerial Accounting (3 credits)


    The course introduces the student to management's use of accounting data in the decision-making process. Topics covered include: Estimating Cost Behavior using both Linear Regression and Multiple Regression Analysis; Short-term Planning with Constraints on Resources; Information for Production and Control Analysis; Capital Budgeting and; Segment and Managerial Performance Evaluation. It is strongly recommended that students complete DSC 5100 prior to ACC 5500.

  
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    ACC 5520. Tax Implications of Business Decisions (3 credits)


    The course introduces the student to Federal tax planning strategies for business. Includes an overview of the Federal tax system, sources of tax law, guidelines for organizing and financing a business, tax incentives for capital investments, and other tax planning topics.

  
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    ACC 5990. Directed Studies (3 credits)


    Independent study in an area of business administration of particular interest to a student under the direction of one or more faculty members. Students must submit detailed proposals for a directed study, detailing the proposed plan of study, research involved, dates for deliverables, final product to be produced and faculty who will be supervising. Proposals will be reviewed by a faculty committee to determine acceptance of the proposal.


Special Topics in Accounting

  
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    ACCS 4xxx. Special Topics in Accounting (3 credits)


    The study of a particular topic of special importance, relevance, and currency in the field of accounting. The content of the special topics course varies with each offering. Course may be repeated as long as topic being studied is different. PREREQ: ACC 2270 , ACC 2280 .

  
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    ACCS 5xxx. Special Topics (3 credits)


    The study of a particular topic of special importance, relevance, and currency to students in the Master of Business Administration program. The content of the special topics course varies with each offering and may be taken twice.


American Indian Studies

  
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    AIS 1010. Introduction to American Indian Studies (3 credits)


    An introduction to the study of American Indian history and culture. It will examine the issues and forces, past and present, affecting the lives of American Indian peoples.

  
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    AIS 1050. Introduction to Cultural Anthropology (3 credits)


    Crosslisted: (SOC 1050)
    A survey of the various processes and conditions involved in cultural growth and change, including the relation between technology, religion, art, literature, language, and personality development. Emphasis is placed on human ecology and contacts between cultures.

  
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    AIS 1100. History of the American Indian to 1865 (3 credits)


    Crosslisted: (HST 1100)
    A survey of North American Indian history from arrival in the Western Hemisphere to 1865, with emphasis on intertribal and Euro-American relationships, prominent personages, political and economic developments, and adaptation to White culture.

  
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    AIS 1110. History of the American Indian since 1865 (3 credits)


    Crosslisted: (HST 1110)
    A survey of North American Indian history since 1865, with emphasis on intertribal and Euro American relationships, prominent personages, political and economic developments, and adaptation to White culture.

  
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    AIS 2010. American Indian Cultures (3 credits)


    An introductory survey of American Indian cultural traditions through the study of film, art, oral and written literature, music, and religion.

  
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    AIS 2130. American Indian Religious Traditions (3 credits)


    Crosslisted: (REL 2130)
    This course is designed as an introduction to the contributions that American Indian religious traditions make to the general study of religion. As such it is a survey of the religious traditions and practices of American Indians.

  
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    AIS 2170. North American Indian Art (3 credits)


    Crosslisted: (ART 2170)
    A survey of indigenous painting, sculpture, and architecture in North American Indians, from about 3000 BCE to the present. Major developments in the visual arts and their cultural contexts will be examined.

  
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    AIS 2200. Native American Literature (3 credits)


    Crosslisted: (ENG 2200)
    A survey of literature produced by Native Americans. The course will cover fiction and poetry, and close attention will be paid to historical contexts and themes central to the understanding of Native American literature. Authors may include Momaday, Silko, Hogan, Vizenor, Welch, and Erdrich. PREREQ: "C" grade or better in ENG 1050 .

  
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    AIS 2310. Race, Culture, and the Lumbee Experience (3 credits)


    Crosslisted: (EDN 2310)
    This course will examine and explore the fundamental psychosocial elements that constitute race, prejudice, and discrimination using Lumbee ethnicity as the model for examination.

  
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    AIS 2390. American Indian Education (3 credits)


    A study of the history of Indian education policy and practice in the United States focusing on traditional tribal methods as well as contemporary federal, state, and tribal programs.

  
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    AIS 2410. Environmental Literature (3 credits)


    Crosslisted: (ENG 2410)
    Survey of Indigenous and multinational environmental literature and its relationship to race, class, gender, sexuality, and/or dis/ability, attentive to local human and ecological communities. Variety of authors and genres. PREREQ: "C" grade or better in ENG 1050 .

  
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    AIS 3240. Indians of Latin America (3 credits)


    Crosslisted: (HST 3850)
    A study of the history, culture, and contemporary achievement of the Indians residing south of the Rio Grande.

  
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    AIS 3260. Indians of the Southeast (3 credits)


    Crosslisted: (HST 3260)
    A thorough examination of the history, culture, interaction, and present condition of the major tribes of southeastern America.

  
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    AIS 3400. American Indians and Film (3 credits)


    This course will study a number of films which either focus on or incorporate the American Indian into their stories. Emphasis will be placed on analyzing the image portrayed and the historical perspective presented.

  
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    AIS 3440. The Native American Novel (3 credits)


    Crosslisted: (ENG 3440)
    A critical study of the Native American novel from its inception to the present, with emphasis on social, political, and cultural history. Particular attention will be paid to the narrative techniques of these authors with a focus on the relationship between oral traditions and the form of the novel. PREREQ: ENG 3040  or permission of instructor.

  
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    AIS 3470. Native American Poetry (3 credits)


    Crosslisted: (ENG 3470)
    A critical study of Native American poetry and poetics, with emphasis on social, political, cultural, and Native national histories. Particular attention will be paid to the techniques of these authors with a focus on the relationship between oral traditions and contemporary poetry. PREREQ: AIS 1010  or AIS 2200 /ENG 2200 , ENG 3040 , or permission of instructor.

  
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    AIS 3600. History and Culture of the Lumbee (3 credits)


    A study of the history and culture of the Lumbee Indians, the largest tribal group east of the Mississippi. While the focus will be primarily historical, all facets of Lumbee culture will be treated including the economic, political, and religious structure of the people as well as artistic and literary accomplishments.

  
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    AIS 3880. Native American Populations (3 credits)


    Crosslisted: (SWK 3880/SOC 3880)
    Using a person-in-environment perspective, the social service delivery system is analyzed within the uniqueness of the cultural parameters of different tribal communities. Laws and regulations that affect social service delivery to Native Americans are viewed. Social problems that are common among Native American groups are also emphasized while equipping students with skills, sensitivities, and a knowledge base necessary to practice generalist social work effectively. PREREQ: SWK 2000  is recommended.

  
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    AIS 3950. Archaeology in North Carolina (3 credits)


    This course approaches archaeology as a way to learn about human beings. Special emphasis will be placed on prehistoric Indian cultures of North Carolina, and especially those of Robeson County. Topics will include: application of archaeology to present day issues; recovering and caring for archaeological materials; stages of Indian prehistory; theoretical and practical issues which face the archaeologist; etc.

  
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    AIS 4020. Federal Policy and the American Indian (3 credits)


    A study of federal Indian policy from the Colonial period to the present. PREREQ: Permission of the instructor.

  
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    AIS 4040. Field Methods in Archaeology (3 credits)


    In this course students will perfect proper use of field methods and techniques in archaeology. Topics will include site reconnaissance, systematic sampling of surface and sub‑surface materials, excavation, and record keeping.

  
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    AIS 4050. Contemporary Issues of American Indians (3 credits)


    This seminar‑style course examines the principal issues of concern to American Indians in the twentieth century. Both national and local in scope, topics include: politics; economics; treaty relationships with federal and state governments; education; alcohol and substance abuse; the environment; cultural identity and survival; relation with non‑Indians; religious freedom; land and water rights; tribal sovereignty; and other contemporary issues as they arise.

  
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    AIS 4150. Amerindian Oral Traditions (3 credits)


    Crosslisted: (REL 4150)
    An examination of selected American Indian oral narrative traditions emphasizing a religio-literary assessment of mythical, anecdotal, and historical stories.

  
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    AIS 4230. Indigenous Women (3 credits)


    Crosslisted: (HST 4230)
    An interdisciplinary study of the historical and contemporary experiences of Indigenous women, focusing on but not limited to Native women in North America. Course will examine Native women's community roles and cultural practices prior to and since colonization and will privilege Native women's perspectives in course texts.

  
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    AIS 4500. Seminar in Native American Literature (3 credits)


    Crosslisted: (ENG 4500)
    A study of selected American Indian literature topics.

  
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    AIS 4520. Meso-America Before European Contact (3 credits)


    To acquaint the advanced student with the diversity of the Meso-American Indian cultures as they existed in Central America prior to the arrival of Europeans, using historical, literary and archaeological materials to disclose their advanced cultural developments, to examine critically some of the romantic myths and negative stereotypes surrounding the Meso-American Indians, and to better understand our own 21st Century views of Meso-American Indian cultures.

  
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    AIS 4600. American Indian Health (3 credits)


    This course examines nutritional, cultural, demographic, and socio‑economic aspects of health of American Indians from prehistoric times into the present; these will be evaluated with a view to lessons for modern Indian health practitioners. Topics also include effects of European contact on Indian health, modern health problems in Indian communities, and traditional Indian medical practices. PREREQ: Junior standing or permission of the instructor.

  
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    AIS 4650. Indian Residential and Boarding School Narratives (3 credits)


    Crosslisted: (HST 4650)
    An in-depth study of the Canadian Indian residential school and American Indian boarding school experience, focusing on autobiographical narratives by Indigenous authors who experienced life in these schools. Course incorporates a range of authors, perspectives, and genres to contextualize colonial institutional polices aimed at "civilizing" Indian "savagery," and forms of Indigenous resistance, accommodation, healing, and cultural survival. PREREQ: AIS 1010 , AIS 1100 /HST 1100  or HST 1110 , AIS 2200 /ENG 2200  or ENG 3440 , or permission of instructor.

  
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    AIS 4990. Independent Study in American Indian Studies (3 credits)


    Directed reading and research under the guidance of the instructor in a specific area or problem in American Indian Studies. PREREQ: Consent of instructor.

  
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    AIS 5050. Contemporary Issues of American Indians (3 credits)


    This seminar-style course examines major issues of American Indians in the 20th century. Both local and national in scope, topics to be addressed include: politics, economics, treaty relationships with federal and state governments, education, alcohol and substance abuse, the environment, cultural identity, relations with non-Indians, religious freedom, land and water rights, tribal sovereignty, and other issues as they arise.

  
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    AIS 5150. Amerindian Oral Traditions (3 credits)


    An examination of selected American Indian oral narrative traditions emphasizing a religio-literary assessment of mythical, anecdotal, and historical stories.

  
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    AIS 5500. Native American Literature (3 credits)


    Study of the historical and continuing contributions of Native American authors to literary studies, especially within the United States. Particular attention will be paid to the intersections of Euroamerican and Native American traditions. Topics covered may include, contemporary issues, oral and written traditions, identity, place, colonization, displacement, and differing world views.


Special Topics in American Indian Studies

  
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    AISS 2xxx. Special Topics in American Indian Studies (1-3 credits)


    Selected topics in American Indian studies.

  
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    AISS 4xxx. Special Topics in American Indian Studies (1-3 credits)


    Investigations into selected topics in American Indian studies through the reading of significant books, discussions, and supplementary reports. PREREQ: Permission of the instructor.


Aerospace Studies

  
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    ARS 1110. The Foundation of the USAF (1 credit)


    This is a survey course designed to introduce students to the U.S. Air Force and Air Force Reserve Officer Training Corps. Featured topics include: Air Force mission and organization; officership and professionalism; military customs and courtesies, officer opportunities; group leadership; and an introduction to problem-solving skills. Leadership Laboratory is mandatory for AFROTC cadets and complements this course by providing cadets with fellowship experiences.

  
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    ARS 1120. The Foundation of the USAF (1 credit)


    This is a survey course designed to introduce students to the U.S. Air Force and Air Force Reserve Officer Training Corps. Featured topics include: Air Force mission and organization; officership and professionalism; military customs and courtesies, officer opportunities; group leadership; and an introduction to problem-solving skills. Leadership Laboratory is mandatory for AFROTC cadets and complements this course by providing cadets with fellowship experiences.

  
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    ARS 2110. Evolution of USAF Air and Space Power (1)


    The ARS 2110/ARS 2120 curriculum provides a survey course designed to help students evolve from an AFROTC General Military Course (GMC) cadet to an AFROTC Professional Officer Course (POC) cadet (or officer candidate). This course will examine general aspects of air and space power through a historical perspective. Using this perspective, the course covers a period from the first balloons and dirigibles to the space-age global positioning systems of today. The course provides historical examples to extrapolate the development of Air Force capabilities (previously referred to as core competencies) and missions (functions) to demonstrate the evolution of what has become today's USAF air and space power. Furthermore, the course examines several fundamental truths associated with war in the third dimension (e.g., Principles of War and Tenets of Air and Space Power). As a whole, this course provides students with a knowledge level understanding of the general elements and employment of air and space power from an institutional, doctrinal, and historical perspective. In addition, we will discuss the Air Force Core Values, using operational examples. Students will conduct writing and briefing exercises that will introduce them to Air Force communication skills requirements. A mandatory Leadership Laboratory (LLAB) complements this course by providing leadership and followership experiences, giving students the opportunity to apply the leadership and followership principles of this course.

  
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    ARS 2120. Evolution of USAF Air and Space Power (1)


    The ARS 2110/ARS 2120 curriculum provides a survey course designed to help students evolve from an AFROTC General Military Course (GMC) cadet to an AFROTC Professional Officer Course (POC) cadet (or officer candidate). This course will examine general aspects of air and space power through a historical perspective. Using this perspective, the course covers a period from the first balloons and dirigibles to the space-age global positioning systems of today. The course provides historical examples to extrapolate the development of Air Force capabilities (previously referred to as core competencies) and missions (functions) to demonstrate the evolution of what has become today's USAF air and space power. Furthermore, the course examines several fundamental truths associated with war in the third dimension (e.g., Principles of War and Tenets of Air and Space Power). As a whole, this course provides students with a knowledge level understanding of the general elements and employment of air and space power from an institutional, doctrinal, and historical perspective. In addition, we will discuss the Air Force Core Values, using operational examples. Students will conduct writing and briefing exercises that will introduce them to Air Force communication skills requirements. A mandatory Leadership Laboratory (LLAB) complements this course by providing leadership and followership experiences, giving students the opportunity to apply the leadership and followership principles of this course.

  
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    ARS 3110. Air Force Leadership and Management (3 credits)


    ARS 3110 & ARS 3120  is a study of leadership, quality management fundamentals, professional knowledge, Air Force doctrine, leadership, ethics, and communications skills required of an Air Force junior officer. Case studies are used to examine Air Force leadership and management situations as a means of demonstrating and exercising practical application of the concepts being studied. A mandatory Leadership Laboratory complements this course by providing advance leadership experiences in officer- type activities, giving students the opportunity to apply leadership and management principles of this course.

  
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    ARS 3120. Air Force Leadership and Management (3 credits)


    ARS 3110  & 3120 is a study of leadership, quality management fundamentals, professional knowledge, Air Force doctrine, leadership, ethics, and communications skills required of an Air Force junior officer. Case studies are used to examine Air Force leadership and management situations as a means of demonstrating and exercising practical application of the concepts being studied. A mandatory Leadership Laboratory complements this course by providing advance leadership experiences in officer- type activities, giving students the opportunity to apply leadership and management principles of this course.

  
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    ARS 4110. National Security Affairs/Preparation for Active Duty (3 credits)


    ARS 4110 and ARS 4120  examines the national security process, regional studies, advanced leadership ethics, and Air Force doctrine. Special topics of interest focus on the military as a profession, officership, military justice, civilian control of the military, preparation for active duty, and current issues affecting military professionalism. Within this structure, continued emphasis is given to refining communication skills. A mandatory Leadership Laboratory complements this course by providing advanced leadership experiences, giving students the opportunity to apply the leadership and management principles of this course.

  
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    ARS 4120. National Security Affairs/Preparation for Active Duty (3 credits)


    ARS 4110  and ARS 4120 examines the national security process, regional studies, advanced leadership ethics, and Air Force doctrine. Special topics of interest focus on the military as a profession, officership, military justice, civilian control of the military, preparation for active duty, and current issues affecting military professionalism. Within this structure, continued emphasis is given to refining communication skills. A mandatory Leadership Laboratory complements this course by providing advanced leadership experiences, giving students the opportunity to apply the leadership and management principles of this course.


Art

  
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    ART 1010. Elements of Design (3 credits)


    An introduction to two-dimensional design concepts, theory, and techniques through the study and application of the elements and principles of composition.

  
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    ART 1020. Three‑Dimensional Design (3 credits)


    A study and application of design principles in creative three‑dimensional projects in mass and space using various materials.

  
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    ART 1050. Introduction to Sculpture (3 credits)


    An introduction to basic additive and subtractive sculptural techniques and procedures, including problems in casting, carving, and assemblage. Studio projects will emphasize craftsmanship, critical thinking, and conceptual development as tools for visual expression. ART 1020  Three-Dimensional Design recommended before taking this course.

  
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    ART 1110. Ceramics: Introduction to Hand Building (3 credits)


    An introduction to the basic ceramic building techniques, including coil, slab, and pinch techniques. Students will be presented with contemporary and historical practices in the medium of clay. Basic glaze application and firing processes will be introduced. Class projects will focus on craftsmanship and beginning building techniques as well as critical thinking.

  
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    ART 1120. Ceramics: Introduction to the Wheel (3 credits)


    Introduction to wheel throwing will cover the basic techniques for working on the pottery wheel. Students will be presented with contemporary and historical practices associated with the potter's wheel. Basic glaze application, firing processes, and clay mixing will be introduced. Class projects will focus on craftsmanship and throwing techniques to gain proficiency on the wheel.

  
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    ART 1320. Introduction to Drawing (3 credits)


    A course designed to acquaint the student with the basic principles of media and terminology of drawing.

  
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    ART 1330. Introduction to Painting (3 credits)


    An introduction to the basics of water-base/oil paint to emphasize color, structure, and composition. Conceptual approaches and direct observation using still lifes and landscapes will result in individual and group critiques. Related work by earlier artists will be studied. PREREQ: ART 1010 , ART 1320  or permission of instructor.

  
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    ART 1400. Introduction to Printmaking (3 credits)


    An introduction to basic printmaking techniques and procedures, including problems in relief, lithography, and intaglio. The course will survey the historical and contemporary trends in printmaking. Studio projects will emphasize craftsmanship, critical thinking, and conceptual development as tools for visual expression. PREREQ: ART 1010  and ART 1320  or permission of instructor.

  
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    ART 1450. Digital Arts Appreciation (3 credits)


    A course for non-art majors that offers an opportunity for introductory study and activity in various contemporary means of visual communication and design thinking practiced through digital means. Students will find both computers and working creatively with computers and related technologies co-equal foci of this course.

  
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    ART 1500. Introduction to Digital Arts (3 credits)


    This course is an introduction to digital arts and is required of all students majoring in Art . As such, this course has been constructed as an overview of, and a structured opportunity for, basic study in computer-based possibilities in the visual arts. PREREQ: ART 1010  (for majors) or ART 1450  (for nonmajors) or permission of instructor.

  
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    ART 2050. Art Appreciation (3 credits)


    A course for non-art majors to establish an understanding of art and culture. This course will provide an overview of historically significant artworks and art movements and also include studio projects to facilitate a broad comprehension of artistic production.

  
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    ART 2080. Survey of Art I: Ancient through Medieval (3 credits)


    An overview of painting, sculpture, architecture, and related visual arts of major world cultures from prehistoric times to around 1400 A.D., including European, American, Asian, African, and Islamic art. Major artistic developments and their cultural contexts will be emphasized.

  
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    ART 2090. Survey of Art II: Renaissance through Contemporary (3 credits)


    An overview of painting, sculpture, architecture, and related visual arts of major world cultures from the Renaissance to the present, including European, American, Asian, African, and Islamic art. Major artistic developments and their cultural contexts will be emphasized.

  
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    ART 2150. Figure Drawing (3 credits)


    A course to introduce the student to the figure as an art form. Various techniques will be explored. PREREQ: ART 1320  or permission of instructor.

  
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    ART 2160. Non-Western Art (3 credits)


    An overview of the art and architecture of cultures beyond western Europe and its diaspora, to include the indigenous arts of the Americas, Asia, Africa, and the South Pacific. Major developments in the visual arts and their cultural contexts will be examined.

  
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    ART 2170. North American Indian Art (3 credits)


    Crosslisted: (AIS 2170)
    A survey of indigenous painting, sculpture, and architecture in North American Indians from about 3000 BCE to the present. Major developments in the visual arts and their cultural contexts will be examined.

  
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    ART 2320. Intermediate Drawing (3 credits)


    Intermediate study in drawing as complete art form. Further exploration of drawing techniques using drawing assignments and student developed conceptually focused projects which may include experimental approaches. PREREQ: ART 1320 .

  
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    ART 2330. Intermediate Painting (3 credits)


    This course builds on the conceptual and perceptual base of Introduction to Painting. Approaches of 20th-century artistic styles, techniques, and media will be studied. Figure and Abstract painting will result in group and individual critiques. PREREQ: ART 1330  or permission of instructor.

  
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    ART 2350. Intermediate Sculpture (3 credits)


    Intermediate study in sculptural techniques and procedures involving sculptural media. Studio projects will also incorporate media from the introduction course to create mixed media sculptural forms. The course will include moderate problems in the use of research, craftsmanship, critical thinking, and conceptual development in the context of visual problem-solving. PREREQ: ART 1020 , ART 1050 .

  
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    ART 2400. Intermediate Printmaking (3 credits)


    Intermediate study in printmaking, including general research in historical and contemporary methods and conceptual approaches. Studio projects will present traditional printmaking techniques while simultaneously introducing digital, photographic, kinetic, mixed media, or volumetric processes as appropriate. The course will include moderate problems in the use of research, craftsmanship, critical thinking, and conceptual development in the context of visual problem-solving. PREREQ: ART 1400 .

  
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    ART 2410. Intermediate Ceramics (3 credits)


    Intermediate study of ceramics will focus on hand building or wheel throwing. Students will build upon the skills developed in the beginning-level course. Students will be introduced to basic glaze formulation and mixing of glazes for class and personal use. Intermediate-level projects will focus on students' understanding of ceramic materials as well as introduction to conceptual aspects of ceramic art. PREREQ: ART 1110  or ART 1120  or permission of instructor.

  
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    ART 2500. Intermediate Digital Arts (3 credits)


    This course focuses on the history, tools, and practices of layout, illustration, typography, and general graphic design accomplished for the purposes of advertising and visual communication. PREREQ: ART 1500  or permission of instructor.

  
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    ART 3000. Advanced Digital Arts I (3 credits)


    This course is an opportunity for further inquiry into the digital arts in general and more specifically current technologies involving the study and practice of still and sequenced imagery acquisition, manipulation, and output through the use of digital cameras and digital video cameras. PREREQ: ART 1500 , ART 2500 .

  
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    ART 3050. Art Education Methods in Grades K‑6 (3 credits)


    This course focuses on the creative abilities of the elementary school child. The course will explore the graphic abilities of the child, the philosophy of sequential learning, and various production techniques and processes appropriate for elementary school. In addition to creating and executing production lesson plans, students will learn to discuss exemplary works of art with the elementary student.

  
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    ART 3080. Art Education Field Experience for Grades K-12 (3 credits) (3 credits)


    Purposes, methods, materials, and evaluation procedures in visual arts education in grades K-12. The students will develop curricula, unit plans, and lesson plans that respond to the unique features of the learning environment. This course also provides art education majors with early field experiences, teaching art in a variety of educational settings. Direct observations in the public schools will aid in preparation of teaching plans, techniques and materials. PREREQ: ART 3050, ART 3090, Admission to Teacher Education Program, or permission of instructor.

  
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    ART 3090. Art Education Secondary Methods (3 credits)


    Through experiences in this course, students will gain insight into different cultures and their visual arts and crafts, history, methods, processes, techniques, and other consideration germane to teaching art in contemporary secondary classrooms. The course will explore various processes and techniques appropriate for different styles of learning, and techniques of classroom maintenance and management in classrooms grade 6-12. 

  
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    ART 3150. Advanced Sculpture I (3 credits)


    Moderate to advanced study in sculptural techniques and procedures involving sculptural media in a continuation of the development of skills in material from previous sculpture courses. Instruction in traditional and contemporary techniques will be accompanied by the introduction of projects involving stylistic and thematic development, exhibition of artwork, and participation in the sculpture community. The course will include moderate to advanced problems in the use of research, craftsmanship, critical thinking, and conceptual development in the context of visual problem-solving. PREREQ: ART 2350 .

  
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    ART 3200. Advanced Drawing I (3 credits)


    Advanced study in drawing as a complete art form. Special attention will be given to the further development of conceptual approaches and contemporary trends in drawing. The student will develop and explore personal self‑generated project ideas in whatever drawing format that is considered appropriate for the project. PREREQ: ART 2320 .

  
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    ART 3310. Advanced Painting I (3 credits)


    This course develops advanced painting skills and encourages individual stylistic and conceptual development, while also studying the work of contemporary artists. Studio projects will emphasize sustained media exploration resulting in a series of works. Students participate in group and individual critiques. PREREQ: ART 2330  or permission of instructor.

  
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    ART 3410. Advanced Ceramics I (3 credits)


    Moderate to advanced study of ceramics will introduce students to projects that require conceptual planning and research. Students may choose to focus on either hand building or wheel throwing. Practices from the ceramic industry will be explored and utilized as tools for art making. Students begin to address their personal stylistic approach to ceramic art. Advanced students will begin to control a larger part of the processes and material associated with their projects. Technical proficiency will be emphasized. PREREQ: ART 2410  or permission of instructor.

  
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    ART 3500. Advanced Printmaking I (3 credits)


    Moderate to advanced study in printmaking, including specific study of historical and contemporary methods and conceptual approaches. Instruction in traditional and contemporary techniques will be accompanied by the introduction of projects involving stylistic and thematic development, exhibition of artwork, and participation in the printmaking community. The course will include moderate to advanced problems in the use of research, craftsmanship, critical thinking, and conceptual development in the context of visual problem-solving. PREREQ: ART 2400 .

  
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    ART 3700. Ancient Greek Art (3 credits)


    An overview of art and archaeology related to the ancient history and culture of the Greeks. Emphasis placed on Greek painting, sculpture, ceramics, and architecture from 3000 to 150 BCE. Major artistic developments and their cultural contexts will be examined.

  
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    ART 3710. Ancient Roman Art (3 credits)


    An overview of art and archaeology related to the ancient history and culture of the Romans. Emphasis placed on Roman painting, sculpture, and architecture from 500 BCE to 330 CE. Major artistic developments and their cultural contexts will be examined.

  
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    ART 3720. Medieval Art (3 credits)


    A survey of European sacred and secular arts produced during the Middle Ages, from about 300 to 1450 CE, including Early Christian, Byzantine, Carolingian, Ottonian, Romanesque, and Gothic Art. Emphasis on church and monastic architecture, sculpture and illuminated manuscripts. Major developments in the visual arts and their cultural contexts will be examined.

 

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