Sep 26, 2020  
The University of North Carolina at Pembroke 2017-2018 Catalog 
    
The University of North Carolina at Pembroke 2017-2018 Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Philosophy

  
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    PHI 3010. Moral Theory (3 credits)


    This course will take an in-depth focus on the major theoretical approaches to ethics. The course will begin with a review of the historical origins of moral theory (Aristotle, Kant, and Mill). During the second part of the class, we will examine several attempts to rearticulate virtue ethics, Kantian ethics, and utilitarianism to address contemporary concerns. This course is intended as an advanced course in moral theory and is not a replacement for PHI 2040 . PREREQ: PHI 1000  or PHI 2040 .

  
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    PHI 3080. The Great Philosophers: Ancient and Medieval (3 credits)


    Studies in Plato, Aristotle, Augustine, Aquinas, and others. PREREQ: PHI 1000  or consent of instructor.

  
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    PHI 3090. Modern Philosophy (3 credits)


    Studies in Descartes, Locke, Kant, Hegel, Nietzsche, and Wittgenstein. PREREQ: PHI 1000  or consent of instructor.

  
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    PHI 3110. Theories of Knowledge and Reality (3 credits)


    A study of the major attempts to answer the fundamental questions about the self, the nature of reality, God, perception, and belief. PREREQ: PHI 1000  or consent of instructor.

  
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    PHI 3160. Sports Ethics (3 credits)


    This course will examine ethical issues that arise in sports. Issues such as sportsmanship, the use of performance-enhancing drugs, and fair play will be discussed.

  
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    PHI 3200. Ethics, Politics, and Law (3 credits)


    A study of the issues that lie at the intersection of moral theory, political philosophy, and legal philosophy, the course will address several issues of particular interest to all three fields, among them punishment, freedom of speech, and the nature of political obligation. Analysis will be filtered through a careful reading of several important contemporary works in moral, political, and legal philosophy. The course assumes some background in at least one of the three areas being studied. PREREQ: PHI 2040 .

  
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    PHI 3210. Philosophy of Science (3 credits)


    A study of the problems and implications of the mathematical, physical, biological, and social sciences leading to philosophical synthesis of the relation between the sciences and humans. PREREQ: PHI 1000  or instructor consent.

  
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    PHI 3220. Religion and Science (3 credits)


    Crosslisted: (REL 3220)
    An examination of issues between science and religion and a consideration of a tradition in natural theology used to validate religious claims.

  
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    PHI 3300. Environmental Ethics (3 credits)


    Ethical issues related to such topics as climate change, overpopulation, animal rights, future generations, and pollution will be explored.

  
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    PHI 3400. Writing in Philosophy and Religious Studies (3 credits)


    Crosslisted: (REL 3400)
    A Writing-in-the-Disciplines course providing instruction and active learning with respect to writing in philosophy and in religious studies. It addresses discipline-appropriate style, audience, organization, research methods, citation, and editing.

  
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    PHI 3550. Philosophy of Religion (3 credits)


    Crosslisted: (REL 3550)
    An inquiry into the philosophical foundations of religion, the problems connected with belief and knowledge, faith and reason, the character and meanings of religious commitment.

  
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    PHI 3760. Medical Ethics (3 credits)


    An examination of the major ethical issues raised by recent medical developments, such as: abortion, psychosurgery, organ transplants, euthanasia, human experimentation and health care.

  
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    PHI 4000. Contemporary Philosophy (3 credits)


    A study of phenomenology, existentialism, post‑modernism, logical positivism, ordinary language philosophy, and conceptual analysis.

  
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    PHI 4030. War and Morality (3 credits)


    When is a nation justified in going to war, or are we morally obliged to refrain from killing others? Ought decisions to wage war be constrained by morality at all? And, in the event that war is sometimes justified, are there restrictions upon what soldiers are permitted to do in war? This course will explore a range of possible answers to these questions. After a brief overview of contemporary moral theory, students will discuss arguments for and against pacifism and realism and then turn their attention to a middle-ground answer, just war theory, which attempts to place moral limits on the practice of war. PREREQ: PHI 1000 .

  
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    PHI 4230. Philosophy of Art and Beauty (3 credits)


    A study of aesthetic values in nature, art, literature, music, and drama.

  
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    PHI 4430. Business Ethics (3 credits)


    An analysis and evaluation of ethical theories and their application to business. Possible topics include economic justice, social responsibility of business, corporate responsibility, self‑regulation and government regulation, duties to the environment, ethics of advertising, the rights and duties of employees, manufacturers and consumers.

  
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    PHI 4500. Advanced Studies in Eastern Philosophies and Religions (3 credits)


    Crosslisted: (REL 4500)
    In-depth analysis of Eastern (Asian) philosophies/religions/ways of life, based on the reading of primary Hindu, Buddhist, and Taoist texts. Jainism, Sikhism, Confucianism, and Shinto also receive coverage. Comparison of Eastern and Western understandings of the nature of religion, philosophy, ultimate reality, and the human condition and destiny is included.

  
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    PHI 4990. Independent Study in Philosophy (1-3 credits)


    A student who wishes to enroll in 4990, Independent Study, must: 1. be classified as a senior, 2. Have a cumulative grade point average of 3.0 or better in the major area of study, 3. request independent study in the major area, and 4. submit a Request for Approval of Independent Study in triplicate to the Office of Academic Affairs. The form can be obtained from the Department Chair. It must be approved by: 1. the professor supervising the student in independent study, 2. the Department Chair, 3. the Registrar, and 4. the Office for Academic Affairs. The student may elect to work for one, two, or three semester hours of credit. Upon completion of the independent study, the student must prepare a written report of the study in triplicate. If the supervising professor feels it is appropriate, the report will be catalogued and permanently housed in the Library.


Special Topics in Philosophy

  
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    PHIS 4xxx. Seminar in Philosophy (1-3 credits)


    An examination of selected philosophers, movements, problems, or major ideas to be presented each term the course is presented. The objectives of the course may be met by directed research. The course may be repeated for credit up to and including 9 semester hours as long as there is no duplication of subject matter. PREREQ: Consent of instructor.


Physical Science

  
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    PHS 1080. Physical Science Laboratory I (1 credit)


    Laboratory activities designed to parallel and reinforce the concepts presented in PHS 1100  and PHS 1110 . PREREQ: Enrollment in or completion of PHS 1100  or equivalent.

  
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    PHS 1090. Physical Science Laboratory II (1 credit)


    Laboratory activities designed to parallel and reinforce the concepts presented in PHS 1100  and PHS 1110 . PREREQ: Enrollment in or completion of PHS 1100  or equivalent.

  
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    PHS 1100. Physical Science I (3 credits)


    Intended for the non-science major, these courses serve as an introduction to fundamental concepts in chemistry and physics.

  
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    PHS 1110. Physical Science II (3 credits)


    Intended for the non-science major, these courses serve as an introduction to fundamental concepts in chemistry and physics. PREREQ: PHS 1100  or equivalent.

  
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    PHS 1140. Physics of Music (3 credits)


    This course examines the creation, characteristics, hearing, and reproduction of sound in general and of music specifically. Students will also design, construct, and demonstrate their own instruments.

  
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    PHS 1160. Exploring Man's Energy Choices (3 credits)


    A survey of the evolution of the energy crisis. The various energy alternatives are considered with regard to the technological, environmental, and economic problems associated with each.

  
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    PHS 1560. Astronomy (3 credits)


    A study of all matter and energy in the universe, emphasizing the concentration of this matter and energy in evolving bodies such as planets, stars, and galaxies. Topics include the sun, solar systems, stars, black holes, pulsars, supernova and quasars.

  
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    PHS 1570. Astronomy Laboratory (1 credit)


    Astronomical observations and principles of experimentation, includes knowledge of the sky and its motions, optics, star and galaxy properties both with real physical experiments and computer simulations. Hands-on laboratory, usually held in the evenings so the heavens can be observed on clear nights. This course is often taken simultaneously with PHS 1560 . PREREQ: Enrollment in or completion of PHS 1560 .

  
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    PHS 2460. Weather and Climate (3 credits)


    Crosslisted: (GGY 2460, GLY 2460)
    Study of atmospheric elements and controls, weather analysis and forecasting, and air pollution issues. Also includes a survey of world climate regions and applications of climate data.

  
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    PHS 5000. The Art and Science of Chemistry and Physics (3 credits)


    Essential concepts of chemistry and physics will be explored in the context of current topics in science and technology. Varied course assignments will actively engage students in the review of popular and scientific literature; the collection, analysis, interpretation, and presentation of scientific data; and the correlation of scientific knowledge to societal issues. PREREQ: Enrollment in an MA or MS degree program.


Physics

  
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    PHY 1000. Elementary Physics I (3 credits)


    In an essentially descriptive fashion this course describes the nature of: motion and its causes, energy, momentum, theory of relativity, heat and temperature, pressure, sound, and others.

  
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    PHY 1010. Elementary Physics II (3 credits)


    In the fashion of PHY 1010, this course describes the nature of electricity and magnetism, light and optical devices, and the atom (what we now know and what we believe we can't know). PREREQ: It is helpful (but not required) to have taken PHY 1000  as background for this course.

  
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    PHY 1200. Science and Computing (2 credits)


    A broad survey of topics related to the role computers play in science. No special knowledge is required of the student as the course is meant as an introduction to anyone interested in how computers are used in the field of science. Topics will include design and function of the PC, data collection and analysis, the Internet, Fortran programming, and basic word processing.

  
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    PHY 1500. College Physics I (3 credits)


    A treatment of the subject matter of general physics (listed, in part, under 1000, 1010) at a level of thoroughness expected in such curricula as pre‑med, biochemistry, etc. (for pre‑engineering or physics curricula see PHY 2000 , PHY 2010 ). PREREQ: MAT 1070 , 1090, 2210, or 2220.

  
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    PHY 1510. College Physics II (3 credits)


    A treatment of the subject matter of general physics (listed, in part, under PHY 1000 , PHY 1010 ) at a level of thoroughness expected in such curricula as pre‑med, biochemistry, etc. (for pre‑engineering or physics curricula see PHY 2000 , PHY 2010 ). PREREQ: Completion of PHY 1500 .

  
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    PHY 1560. College Physics Lab I (1 credit)


    A student laboratory to complement and reinforce the physical relationships discussed in the lecture classes. PREREQ: Enrollment in or completion of PHY 1000  or PHY 1500 .

  
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    PHY 1570. College Physics Lab II (1 credit)


    A student laboratory to complement and reinforce the physical relationships discussed in the lecture classes. PREREQ: Enrollment in or completion of PHY 1010  or PHY 1510 .

  
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    PHY 2000. University Physics I (3 credits)


    A study of Classical Newtonian mechanics with an emphasis on Newton's three laws of motion. This calculus-based course describes the nature of motion, forces, energy, momentum, collisions, rotation, gravitation, sound, and heat. A beginning course expected in such curricula as pre-engineering, physics, etc. PREREQ/COREQ: MAT 2210 .

  
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    PHY 2010. University Physics II (3 credits)


    A calculus-based study of electricity, magnetism, optics, relativity, quantum and nuclear physics. A beginning course expected in such curricula as pre-engineering, physics, etc. PREREQ: PHY 2000 .

  
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    PHY 2060. University Physics Laboratory I (1 credit)


    A student laboratory to complement and reinforce the physical relationships discussed in the University Physics lecture classes. PREREQ: Enrollment in or completion of PHY 2000 .

  
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    PHY 2070. University Physics Laboratory II (1 credit)


    A student laboratory to complement and reinforce the physical relationships discussed in the University Physics lecture classes. PREREQ: Enrollment in or completion of PHY 2010 .

  
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    PHY 2180. Optics (3 credits)


    Optical instruments such as cameras, telescopes, and many more are discussed. Their uses, limitations, and how they work are all included. Experimentation comprises half of the course. PREREQ: PHY 1010 , PHY 1510 , or PHY 2010 .

  
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    PHY 2210. Hardware and Software Concepts (3 credits)


    Introductory class exploring the role of computers in contemporary physics. Topics of discussion include hardware architecture, basic concepts in programming, and the application of existing software to classical problems. PREREQ: CSC 2050 , PHY 2000 .

  
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    PHY 2560. Modern Physics (4 credits)


    A survey of 20th century physics including the fundamental ideas underlying special relativity and quantum mechanics. Includes a mandatory three-hour weekly laboratory. PREREQ: PHY 1010 , PHY 1510 , or PHY 2010 .

  
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    PHY 2600. Astrophysics (3 credits)


    An introduction to a range of astrophysical topics with an emphasis on the physical processes involved. Examples of such topics are the discovery of planets and the possibility of life around other stars, stellar formation and structure, supernovae, galactic dynamics and dark matter, theory of relativity and black holes, cosmology, and dark energy. PREREQ: PHS 1560 , PHY 2000 .

  
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    PHY 2880. Methods of Computational Science (3 credits)


    An overview of the methods common to computational science. Topics to include numerical differentiation and integration, Monte Carlo techniques, and how to use higher level programs, e.g. Maple, Mathematica, or Gaussian. Students will also be introduced to computing on a supercomputer with projects to be completed via the North Carolina Super Computer Center (NCSC). PREREQ: PHY 2210 .

  
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    PHY 3000. Classical Mechanics (3 credits)


    Mechanics of particles and system of particles. Solution of problems in Newtonian Mechanics, one dimensional motion, linear, damped, and driven oscillations; two particle collisions, introduction to Lagrangian and Hamiltonian Dynamics. Central force motion. PREREQ: PHY 1500  or PHY 2000  and a working knowledge of calculus.

  
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    PHY 3200. Electricity and Magnetism (3 credits)


    Electrostatics, magnetic and electric fields, capacitance, inductance, electric machinery and meters. PREREQ: PHY 1010 , PHY 1510 , or PHY 2010  and working knowledge of calculus.

  
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    PHY 3210. Electricity and Magnetism (3 credits)


    Electrostatics, magnetic and electric fields, capacitance, inductance, electric machinery and meters. PREREQ: PHY 3200 .

  
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    PHY 3260. Heat and Temperature (3 credits)


    Heat and its effects; heat engines and their limitations. The concepts of entropy and other facets of thermodynamics. PREREQ: PHY 1000 , PHY 1500 , or PHY 2000  and a working knowledge of calculus.

  
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    PHY 3360. Mathematical Physics (3 credits)


    Three dimensional vector and tensor calculus. Green's and Stoke's theorems. Vector spaces, linear independence, orthogonality. Hermitian and unitary operators. Eigenvalues and eigenvectors of operators, functions spaces as vector spaces, and elements of the theory of distributions. PREREQ: A working knowledge of calculus.

  
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    PHY 3410. Biophysics (3 credits)


    Physics applied to biological phenomena, particularly from the point of view of molecular systems and processes. PREREQ: Two semesters of physics, a semester of biology and organic chemistry.

  
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    PHY 3560. Modern Electronics (3 credits)


    An introduction to Analog and Digital Electronics. Problems and techniques of interfacing with laboratory instruments and computers. PREREQ: PHY 1500 or PHY 1510  or PHY 2010  or equivalent.

  
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    PHY 3880. Advanced Computational Physics (3 credits)


    A project driven course in which the student will use various computational approaches to solve standard and/or modern problems in physics. Techniques will include C++ programming, Fortran programming, and advanced applications of software packages such as Maple, Mathematica, or Gaussian. PREREQ: PHY 2880 .

  
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    PHY 3900. Computational Research in Physics (3 credits)


    Requirements for this course include the completion of one or more computationally oriented research projects. Topics will be chosen from current interest across the broad spectrum of contemporary physics. PREREQ: PHY 3880 .

  
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    PHY 4000. Quantum Mechanics (3 credits)


    Generalized eigenvalue problems, angular momentum, spin, the hydrogen atom, and perturbation theory with selected applications from atomic, solid state, and nuclear physics. PREREQ: PHY 2560  and a working knowledge of calculus.

  
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    PHY 4200. Advanced Laboratory I (3 credits)


    Modern physics experiments available from several areas. Choices include: atomic physics, NMR, nuclear physics, radio astronomy, optics and spectroscopy. PREREQ: Consent of Instructor.

  
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    PHY 4210. Advanced Laboratory II (3 credits)


    Modern physics experiments available from several areas. Choices include: atomic physics, NMR, nuclear physics, radio astronomy, optics and spectroscopy. PREREQ: Consent of Instructor.

  
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    PHY 4990. Independent Study (1-3 credits)


    Independent study with departmental faculty member. PREREQ: Consent of Department Chair and Instructor.

  
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    PHY 5200. Current Trends in Physics (3 credits)


    A survey of current development and trends in the various fields of physics. PREREQ: At least 24 credit hours of undergraduate coursework in physics or consent of the instructor and the department chair.

  
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    PHY 5480. Historical Perspectives of Physics (3 credits)


    This course emphasizes the development of physical concepts in the discipline of physics from the earliest records through Aristotle, Einstein and beyond, to the present. Topics include contributions of such scientists as Copernicus, Galileo, Newton, Boyle, Rutherford, Millikan, Bohr, DeBroglie, Schroedinger, and others. Discussions concerning their methods, motives and the mental and social climate of their time are also included.

  
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    PHY 5500. Classical Mechanics (3 credits)


    Newtonian mechanics, linear oscillations, non-linear oscillations, introduction to calculus of variation. Hamilton's principle and La Grange's equations, central force motion, non-inertial frames, rigid body dynamics, vibrating systems. PREREQ: At least 24 credit hours of undergraduate coursework in physics or consent of the instructor and the department chair.

  
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    PHY 5600. Modern Physics (3 credits)


    Special theory of relativity; introductory quantum mechanics with applications to microscopic systems; Fermi-Dirac, Bose-Einstein statistics; and electronic bands in solids. PREREQ: At least 24 credit hours of undergraduate coursework in physics or consent of the instructor and the department chair.


Special Topics in Physics

  
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    PHYS 4xxx. Special Topics (1-3 credits)


    Individual study either of subject matter in existing courses (in more depth) or of subjects for which there is no present formal course. PREREQ: PHY 1010 , PHY 1510 , or PHY 2010 ; MAT 2220 .

  
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    PHYS 5xxx. Special Topics in Physics (3 credits)


    Course content will focus on topics in physics and will vary from offering to offering, with prerequisites appropriate to content. It will meet the special needs of individuals within the master's program at UNCP and of students who seek credit by enrolling in special departmental offerings such as short courses, seminars, and special, intense summer experiences which focus on concepts within the discipline of physics.


Political Science

  
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    PLS 1000. Introduction to Political Science (3 credits)


    A study of general political science concepts, definitions, and approaches within the framework of discussions of how individuals and groups may be able to utilize more effectively the political, social, and economic systems with which they come into contact.

  
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    PLS 1010. Introduction to American National Government (3 credits)


    An introductory study of: (1) the basic concepts of political science, (2) the brief history of the basic principles of the Constitution, (3) the structure, functions of and the relations between the legislative, executive and judicial branches of national government, and (4) the relations between the national and state governments.

  
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    PLS 2000. Introduction to Comparative Politics (3 credits)


    This course provides students with a basic understanding of the political science sub-field of Comparative Politics. It is designed to introduce the various approaches to comparative political analysis. Students will analyze, compare, and contrast the basic political structures, political behavior, public policy, and political procedures of several different countries, each of which has a unique political and cultural structure. PREREQ: PLS 1000  or PLS 1010 .

  
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    PLS 2010. American State & Local Government, Administration & Policy (3 credits)


    Crosslisted: Cross-listed with PAD 2010
    An examination of the institutions, administrative issues, politics, and policy concerns of state and local governments in the United States.

  
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    PLS 2060. Model United Nations (3 credits)


    A study of diplomacy and parliamentary procedure culminating in the practical application of these skills via participation in a Model United Nations Conference. May be repeated up to four times. Additional fees may be required.

  
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    PLS 2070. Model Arab League (3 credits)


    A study of diplomacy and parliamentary procedure culminating in the practical application of these skills via participation in a Model Arab League Conference. May be repeated up to four times. Additional fees may be required.

  
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    PLS 2150. North Carolina Politics and Government (3 credits)


    A study of the North Carolina political system: its environment, the forces and elements making up the system, the policies of that system, and the impact of the policies.

  
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    PLS 2170. Judicial Process and Behavior (3 credits)


    An examination of the role of judges, lawyers, and jurors in the decision making process as influenced by their recruitment and socialization of the political framework in which they operate, and the various factors, ideology, attitudes, and values that influence their decisions. PREREQ: PLS 1000  or PLS 1010 .

  
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    PLS 2220. Introduction to Asian Studies (3 credits)


    Crosslisted: (HST 2220/PHI 2220)
    An introduction to the field of Asian Studies through an interdisciplinary perspective combining history, politics, economics, philosophy, and culture using a variety of theories, methodologies, and sources (textbook, book chapters, articles, literature). The course focuses on East Asia (China, Japan, Korea) but will also include India, Southeast Asia, and other countries. PREREQ: C or better in ENG 1050 .

  
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    PLS 2330. Introduction to Theory and Methodology (4 credits)


    This course concerns basic concepts of political science and teaches the student how to do research, use the library, evaluate the research of others, draw a graph, construct a table, and use a few simple statistical techniques. PREREQ: PLS 1000  or PLS 1010 .

  
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    PLS 2510. Introduction to World Politics (3 credits)


    Crosslisted: (WLS 2510)
    This course gives students a basic understanding of the major issues and aspects of world politics. It includes an overview of trends in world politics in the twenty-first century, considers the relevant global actors, explores the relevance of non-state actors, and focuses on the increasing importance of issues relating to global welfare. A central premise is that world politics is a combination of political, historical, economic, and sociological factors which are not static. PREREQ: PLS 1000  or PLS 1010 .

  
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    PLS 2520. Theories of International Relations (3 credits)


    Analyzes the methods and dominant approaches to the study of international relations including international political economy, theories of conflict, decision making theory, integration theory and deterrence. PREREQ: PLS 1000  or PLS 1010 .

  
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    PLS 3010. Political Parties and Interest Groups in the United States (3 credits)


    The history, development, organization, functions and purpose of parties and interest groups, and the role played by them in the policy-making and election of the government in the United States and other Western democracies. PREREQ: PLS 1010  

  
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    PLS 3025. Fundamentalisms (3 credits)


    Crosslisted: (REL 3025)
    Starting in the 1970s, there has been a substantial growth in the strength of religious radical movements sometimes known as "fundamentalist," which seek to manifest their religious faith in the political arena. The course will examine these phenomena in comparative perspective primarily in Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. We will focus on the religious players in the Middle East conflict. Special attention will be given to the place of Jerusalem as a focal center for religious extremist activity.

  
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    PLS 3030. Political Thought (3 credits)


    A study of the historic and conceptual background of political thought from the classical through contemporary political thinkers. Emphasis is placed on the application of ideas and concepts learned to current political and personal situations so as to enable the student to function better and more thoughtfully as an individual and as a member of various social and political systems. PREREQ: PLS 1000  or PLS 1010 .

  
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    PLS 3040. Legislative Process in the United States (3 credits)


    A study of: (1) the distribution of the legislative power in the three branches of the government, (2) the structure and functions of the legislature, (3) the actual process of legislation both in the national and state governments, its defects and remedies, and (4) the attainment of responsible and responsive government. Important legislative problems will be selected and serve as a basis for analyzing the legislative process. PREREQ: PLS 1010  

  
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    PLS 3050. Public Opinion and Elections in the American Political System (3 credits)


    A study of the nature of public opinion, campaigns, and elections and their functions in the American political system. PREREQ: PLS 1010  and PLS 2330 .

  
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    PLS 3060. The American Presidency (3 credits)


    The central role of the American presidency in the political process and the relationship among the presidency and the other branches of government. PREREQ: PLS 1010  

  
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    PLS 3100. Constitutional Law (3 credits)


    A study of (1) the federal system, especially the relations between the national government and the States, and (2) the jurisdiction of the federal courts. PREREQ: PLS 1010  and PLS 2170 .

  
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    PLS 3110. Constitutional Law of Individual and Equal Rights (3 credits)


    A study of the U.S. Constitution and appellate court rulings and interpretations of civil liberties and individual rights. PREREQ: PLS 1010  and PLS 2170 .

  
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    PLS 3120. Law of Criminal Procedure (3 credits)


    Constitutional limitations on police activity. Due process; right to counsel; arrest, search and seizure; electronic eavesdropping; confessions; and the scope of exclusionary rules. PREREQ: PLS 1010  and PLS 2170 .

  
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    PLS 3220. International Political Economy (3 credits)


    This course examines the political dynamics of the development and management of the contemporary international economic system. It analyzes major issues in the global political economy, including theoretical approaches to understanding the tension between politics and economics, monetary and trade policy, foreign aid, debt, North-South relations, and international environmental issues. PREREQ: PLS 1000  or PLS 1010 .

  
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    PLS 3312. Political Geography (3 credits)


    Crosslisted: (GGY 3312)
    An examination of how geography and politics are tied together at a variety of spatial scales and in different global locations. Includes discussions of political geography both within and between states as well as those areas beyond the states, such as the sea and outer space.

  
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    PLS 3520. Writing in Political Science (3 credits)


    This course provides an introduction to various forms of writing commonly used in political science professions, which may include executive summaries, annotated bibliographies, book reviews, case briefs, and research proposals and papers. Students will learn through researching a single topic of their choosing. This course fulfills the writing in the disciplines requirement. PREREQ: PLS 2330 .

  
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    PLS 3600. Introductory Internship in Political Science (3 credits)


    The acquisition of political and/or legal experience through an arranged internship in a government or community agency or enterprise, under the instruction and supervision of the major professor and a designated official of the agency or enterprise involved. PREREQ: PLS 1000 .or PLS 1010

  
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    PLS 3610. Advanced Internship in Political Science (3 credits)


    This is a continuation of the internship of PLS 3600 . It continues the acquisition of political and/or legal experience through an arranged internship in a government or community agency or enterprise, under the instruction and supervision of the major professor and a designated official of the agency or enterprise involved. PREREQ: PLS 3600 .

  
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    PLS 3620. International Issues (3 credits)


    This course examines selected contemporary political issues and trends, with emphasis on the influence of major political and social arrangements and institutions that play a role international politics. Topics covered may include: international trade, economic development, wars, arms control, terrorism, ethnic conflict, human rights, status of women, population growth, food security, and environmental degradation. The class will serve as a forum for debate about a number of these issues. PREREQ: PLS 1000  or PLS 1010 .

  
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    PLS 3750. Politics in the Developing World (3 credits)


    This course explores issues relating to the social, economic, and political conditions of the developing world. It intends to answer questions such as: 1) What is the Third World and how is it characterized? 2) What is development and is it desirable? and 3) How do countries attain development? Topics to be discussed include: history and geography; population, food and education; political conflict and instability; trade and the world economy; and women in the developing world. PREREQ: PLS 1000  or PLS 1010 .

  
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    PLS 3800. International Organizations (3 credits)


    A survey of the historical evolution, functions and current policies of various types of regional and universal organizations and their role in contemporary international relations. Organizations that deal with transnational issues, peacekeeping, and international political economy will be featured. Special emphasis will be placed on the United Nations, its structure, and its role in the world. PREREQ: PLS 1000  or PLS 1010 .

  
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    PLS 3810. International Law (3 credits)


    This course introduces students to the field of international law. It emphasizes the connection between international law and world order. Topics covered include sources of international law, its relation to municipal law, the rights and duties of states and individuals, state territory and jurisdiction, international agreements, nationality and the treatment of aliens, diplomatic and consular relations, war and the use of force, and common space resource regimes. PREREQ: PLS 1000  or PLS 1010 .

  
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    PLS 3980. Directed Research in Political Science I (1-3 credits)


    Written acceptance by a supervising faculty member is required, based on the student's written proposal. A copy of the proposal together with the faculty member's acceptance must be submitted for approval to the Department Chair prior to registration. PREREQ: PLS 1000  or PLS 1010  and permission of instructor.

  
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    PLS 3990. Directed Research in Political Science II (1-3 credits)


    Written acceptance by a supervising faculty member is required, based on the student's written proposal. A copy of the proposal together with the faculty member's acceptance must be submitted for approval to the Department Chair prior to registration. PREREQ: PLS 1000  or PLS 1010  and permission of instructor.

  
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    PLS 4020. Selected Topics in American Government (3 credits)


    A study of selected problems, either in theory or in practice, in American government, with readings, discussions and papers on these problems. PREREQ: PLS 1000  or PLS 1010 .

  
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    PLS 4050. Washington Internship (6-12 credits)


    This internship presents an opportunity for a student to get a deeper understanding of the legislative process by participating in the activities of a U.S. Congressman's office. The intern will spend a semester in Washington, D.C. working in the office of a Congressman and will be responsible for performing assigned research on legislative issues as well as working on constituency problems. Students will be assigned reading material on the legislative process and will be required to submit various papers in order to fulfill the internship requirements. The internship is limited to Political Science majors. No more than six credit hours may be applied to fulfill the thirty six hour requirement for a major in political science nor is the student eligible to enroll in any other departmental internship program (PLS 360, 361, or 364). Scheduled for political science majors with the approval of the Chair of the Department. PREREQ: PLS 1010  and Junior or Senior standing required at time of participation.

  
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    PLS 4170. International Security Policy (3 credits)


    This course introduces students to the issues, concepts, and theories relating to security in the contemporary international system. It will examine a number of strategies for addressing problems related to war and peace in world politics. It will consider such topics as the nature and origins of war, arms control and proliferation, terrorism, and the causes and consequences of a number of international conflicts, both past and present. Particular attention will be paid to the process of peacekeeping and peacemaking as it relates to international security. PREREQ: PLS 1000  or PLS 1010 .

  
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    PLS 4180. Special Topics in Theory, Philosophy, and Methodology (3 credits)


    An in depth study of a selected topic from the field of political philosophy or methodology. PREREQ: PLS 1000  or PLS 1010 .

 

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